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I see below code in this link : An elegant way to implement INotifyPropertyChanged

I'm new to Expression Tree.can any one please explane how this code work simply?

thanks

private string _name;
public string Name
{
   get { return _name; }
   set { PropertyChanged.ChangeAndNotify(ref _name, value, () => Name); }
}

public static bool ChangeAndNotify<T>(this PropertyChangedEventHandler handler,ref T field, T value, Expression<Func<T>> memberExpression)
    {
        if (memberExpression == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("memberExpression");
        }
        var body = memberExpression.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (body == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Lambda must return a property.");
        }
        if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value))
        {
            return false;
        }

        var vmExpression = body.Expression as ConstantExpression;
        if (vmExpression != null)
        {
            LambdaExpression lambda = Expression.Lambda(vmExpression);
            Delegate vmFunc = lambda.Compile();
            object sender = vmFunc.DynamicInvoke();

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(sender, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(body.Member.Name));
            }
        }

        field = value;
        return true;
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An expression tree is an object-oriented representation of an expression at runtime. The C# compiler can automatically write a limited subset of expressions as Expression<> instances, via a lambda - i.e.

Func<string> anonMethod = () => "abc"; // this is a delegate
Expression<Func<string>> expression = () => "abc"; // this is an expression

The above will have a ConstantExpression; your example will have a ConstantExpression that captures this and a MemberExpression that wraps that constant (this) and the member (.Name). Then at runtime, it locates the MemberExpression, which has a MemberInfo, which has a Name. It could even have a ConstantExpression to a capture class, a MemberExpression to this (as a field on the capture-class), and then a MemberExpression to .Name.

The difference is subtle, but an expression can be pulled apart and inspected at runtime - which is critical for LINQ. However: while the compiler can write these, they are not free to inspect; they have cost too.

IMO, perhaps stick with:

public string Name
{
   get { return _name; }
   set { SomeSimpleNotifyMethod(ref _name, value, this, "Name"; }
}

this is simpler and faster (obviously, changing the method to take a string that it passes to the event).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.you are a great developer.I don't understand this.this in this example point to PropertyChangedEventHandler and how lamda expression wrap this and Name together?is MemberExpression is delegate(lambda) part of Expression Tree?why in line 7 got body of Expression and again in line 17 get Expressoin of body?sorry but it's to comlecated for me. –  Kerezo Jul 26 '11 at 11:26
1  
@Nima no, the delegate is not part of the lambda; that was for contrast only. The bit on line 7 is identifying that the expression is actually a member-access; the bit on line 17 is looking for the object (this in my discussion above); rather than understand the entire tree they've chosen to do a Compile()/DynamicInvoke(), which is, btw, very slow (relatively speaking). Again, I don't recommend that code. –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 11:31
    
you say : The above will have a ConstantExpression.if so why in line 17 convert body to ConstantExpression? –  Kerezo Jul 26 '11 at 11:32
    
@Nima it doesn't; the MemberExpression is, like in C#, a combination of an object and a member, i.e. in C# this.Name; here, the target object is specified as an Expression (just like in C# really, i.e. {some compound expression}.Name). It is testing that to see if it is constant. –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 11:39
1  
@Nima no, not really. It is a bit of a niche; I've blogged about it a bit, etc, but nothing major. To be honest, if you play with it a little while it makes a lot more sense ;p It is wicked confusing initially - don't worry, that is normal. You aren't going mad - this stuff is crazy. –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 21:38

Here's an extension method that is able to determine sender and property name just by inspecting lambda expression tree and without any major performance impact:

public static class PropertyChangedExtensions
{
    public static void Raise(this PropertyChangedEventHandler handler, Expression<Func<object>> property)
    {
        if (handler == null)
            return;

        var boxingExpr = property.Body as UnaryExpression;

        var memberExpr = (MemberExpression)(boxingExpr == null ? 
            property.Body : boxingExpr.Operand);

        var propertyName = memberExpr.Member.Name;
        var sender = ((ConstantExpression)memberExpr.Expression).Value;
        handler.Invoke(sender, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

and usage is the same as you have right now:

public string Name
{
    get { return name; }
    set
    {
        name = value;
        PropertyChanged.Raise(() => Name);
    }
}
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