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I am goofing around with pointers and structures. I want to achieve the following: (1) define a linked list with a structure (numberRecord) (2) write a function that fills a linked list with some sample records by going thourgh a loop (fillList) (3) count the number of elements in the linked list (4) print the number of elements

I am now so far that the fillList function works well, but I do not succeed in handing over the filled linked list to a pointer in the main(). In the code below, the printList function only displays the single record that was added in main() instead of displaying the list that was created in the function fillList.


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct numberRecord numberRecord;

//linked list
struct numberRecord {
             int number;
        struct numberRecord *next;
};

//count #records in linked list
int countList(struct numberRecord *record) {

         struct numberRecord *index = record;
    int i = 0;

    if (record == NULL)
        return i;

    while (index->next != NULL) {
        ++i;
        index = index->next;
    }

    return i + 1;
}

//print linked list
void printList (struct numberRecord *record) {

    struct numberRecord *index = record;

    if (index == NULL)
        printf("List is empty \n");

    while (index != NULL) {

        printf("%i \n", index->number);
        index = index->next;
    }

}

//fill the linked list with some sample records
void fillList(numberRecord *record) {

    numberRecord *first, *prev, *new, *buffer;

//as soon as you add more records you get an memory error, static construction
    new = (numberRecord *)malloc(100 * sizeof(numberRecord));
    new->number = 0;
    new->next = NULL;

    first = new;
    prev = new;
    buffer = new;

    int i;

    for (i = 1; i < 11; i++) {

        new++;

        new->number = i;
        new->next = NULL;

        prev->next = new;
        prev = prev->next;
    }

    record = first;
}


int main(void) {

    numberRecord *list;
    list = malloc(sizeof(numberRecord));
    list->number = 1;
    list->next = NULL;

    fillList(list);
    printf("ListCount: %i \n", countList(list));
    printList(list);
    return 0;
}

SOLUTION Do read the posts below, they indicated this solution and contain some very insightful remarks about pointers. Below the adapted code that works:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct numberRecord numberRecord;

//linked list
struct numberRecord {
             int number;
        struct numberRecord *next;
};

//count #records in linked list
int countList(struct numberRecord *record) {

         struct numberRecord *index = record;
    int i = 0;

    if (record == NULL)
        return i;

    while (index->next != NULL) {
        ++i;
        index = index->next;
    }

    return i + 1;
}

//print linked list
void printList (struct numberRecord *record) {

    struct numberRecord *index = record;

    if (index == NULL)
        printf("List is empty \n");

    while (index != NULL) {

        printf("%i \n", index->number);
        index = index->next;
    }

}

//fill the linked list with some sample records
 numberRecord *fillList() {

    numberRecord *firstRec, *prevRec, *newRec;

    int i;

    for (i = 1; i < 11; i++) {

        newRec = malloc(sizeof(numberRecord));
        newRec->number = i;
        newRec->next = NULL;

        //initialize firstRec and prevRec with newRec, firstRec remains head
        if (i == 1) {
            firstRec = newRec;
            prevRec = newRec;
        }
        prevRec->next = newRec;
        prevRec = prevRec->next;
    }

    return firstRec;
}


int main(void) {

    numberRecord *list;
    list = fillList();

    printf("ListCount: %i \n", countList(list));
    printList(list);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This statement in fillList

record = first;

has no effect on the list variable in main. Pointers are passed by value (like everything else) in C. If you want to update the list variable in main, you'll either have to pass a pointer to it (&list) and modify fillList accordingly, or return a numberRecord* from fillList. (I'd actually go with that second option.)

Here's a (bad) illustration:

When main calls fillList, at the starting point of that function, the pointers are like this:

main        memory       fillList
list ----> 0x01234 <----  record

A bit later in fillList, you allocate some storage for new (that's actually a bad name, it conflicts with an operator in C++, will get people confused)

main        memory       fillList
list ----> 0x01234 <----  record
           0x03123 <----  new

At the last line of fillList you're left with:

main        memory       fillList
list ----> 0x01234   ,--  record
           0x03123 <----  new

record and list are not the same variable. They start out with the same value, but changing record will not change list. The fact that they are both pointers doesn't make them any different from say ints in this respect.

You can change the thing pointed to by list in fillList, but you can't change what list points to (with your version of the code).

The easiest way for you to get around that is to change fillList like this:

numberRecord *fillList() {
  ....
  return new;
}

And in main, don't allocate list directly, just call fillList() to initialize it.

share|improve this answer
    
S***w me, I'm just nog getting it. No mistake, I do undertand pass by value and pass by reference. I do understand that in order to have a function change a parameter you will have to pass the pointer to that parameter, but I somehow thought I was doing that. If I would abstractly take it further, it would imply that if I wanted to change a pointer, I would have to pass a pointer to a pointer. My lights are going out, this is fairly abstract to me. I don't know if it is a lot of work, but I would appreciate someone changing the code. I am already fooling around with this for 2 days. –  Django Jul 26 '11 at 11:38
    
@Django: tried to go in a bit more detail –  Mat Jul 26 '11 at 11:49
    
Sorry guys, I cannot get my code posted, it is too much I think. Anyway, what matt suggested works and you can also solve the problem by using a pointer to a pointer. –  Django Jul 26 '11 at 16:21
    
Ok, I accepted your answer Matt, thanks again. In your post I cannot find how to post my code,should I simply open an new entry? Partial comments are deleted. –  Django Jul 26 '11 at 16:29
    
You can either edit your question, adding the solution used (just make sure it's obvious that it's not part of the question), or post an answer with your solution (explaining how it solves your issue). Accepting my answer is nice - but keep in mind you don't have to, and you can remove it, or select another answer, anytime you want. Only accept an answer that really did solve your problem. (That can be your own answer, but you'll have to wait a bit before you can do that.) –  Mat Jul 26 '11 at 16:35

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