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“Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument

I'm obviously missing something here: can anyone explain why t1 "mysteriously" acquires the self.thelist value of t2? What am I doing wrong?

>>> class ThingyWithAList(object):
...     def __init__(self, alist=[]):
...         super(ThingyWithAList, self).__init__()
...         self.thelist = alist
... 
>>> t1 = ThingyWithAList()
>>> t1.thelist.append('foo')
>>> t1.thelist.append('bar')
>>> print t1, t1.thelist
<__main__.ThingyWithAList object at 0x1004a8350> ['foo', 'bar']
>>> 
>>> t2 = ThingyWithAList()
>>> print t2, t2.thelist
<__main__.ThingyWithAList object at 0x1004a8210> ['foo', 'bar']
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marked as duplicate by Jacob, detly, Karl Knechtel, katrielalex, C. A. McCann Jul 26 '11 at 13:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
check this anwser : stackoverflow.com/questions/1132941/… –  mouad Jul 26 '11 at 11:35
    
@mouad - excellent, thanks! I did poke around on SO before posting this question but didn't spot this one. –  Simon Whitaker Jul 26 '11 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because the default argument 'alist=[]', creates only one list, once, when the module is read. This single list becomes the default argument for that __init__", and is shared by all your Thingys.

Try using None as a dummy symbol meaning "make a new empty list here". E.g.

def __init__(self, alist=None):
     super(ThingyWithAList, self).__init__()
     self.thelist = [] if alist is None else alist
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Thanks Adrian; great, succinct answer. :) –  Simon Whitaker Jul 26 '11 at 11:46

If I get it right, the object reference created with [] in the constructor remains the same. Try this instead:

>>> class ThingyWithAList(object):
...     def __init__(self, alist=None):
...         super(ThingyWithAList, self).__init__()
...         self.thelist = alist or []
... 
>>> t1 = ThingyWithAList()
>>> t1.thelist.append('foo')
>>> t1.thelist.append('bar')
>>> print t1, t1.thelist
<__main__.ThingyWithAList object at 0xb75099ac> ['foo', 'bar']
>>> 
>>> t2 = ThingyWithAList()
>>> print t2, t2.thelist
<__main__.ThingyWithAList object at 0xb7509a6c> []
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Your "alist or []" better than my "[] if alist is None else alist". In Perl I automatically think of that kind of syntax, in Python it seems like a Perlism. –  Adrian Ratnapala Jul 26 '11 at 11:42
    
I guess I’ve been too long into Perl to do it any other way. ;-) –  igor Jul 26 '11 at 11:44
    
Excellent, thanks! (It's OK, I still think in Perl from time to time. :-)) –  Simon Whitaker Jul 26 '11 at 11:45
1  
It's very unlikely it matters, but this will result in thelist being set to a new, empty list if it is passed an empty container. So you can't set thelist to be a container you already have a reference to (such as one that is an attribute of another object) this way. It's better to check against None since that's what you really mean. –  agf Jul 26 '11 at 12:47

"Special cases aren't special enough", so checking conditionally for None rubs me the wrong way. If it's important that .thelist really is a list, then the class ought to enforce that itself, too.

def __init__(self, alist=()):
    super(ThingyWithAList, self).__init__()
    self.thelist = list(alist)

Note that there is no danger of modifying the default arg now, because tuples are immutable.

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