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I'm not sure if I correctly understand. TryEnterCriticalSection is called only once, it's not stick like EnterCriticalSection? E.g. if I write something like

if(TryEnterCriticalSection (&cs))
{
//do something that must be synh
LeaveCriticalSection(&cs);
}
else
{
//do other job
}
//go on

and if TryEnterCriticalSection returns false the part do something that must be synh will never be done, and do other job part will be exucuted and then go on?

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And please read your posts and correct the major typos. If you really want to get help you should make it as easy as possible to other people to understand what you want, and not have them figure out the words hidden behind the typos. –  RedX Jul 26 '11 at 11:57
    
sorry, I'll check my posts carefully. –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 12:10
1  
We usually call functions like EnterCriticalSection blocking. If they can't succeed immediately, the execution of code is blocked and the function waits until the blocking condition is resolved. TryEnterCriticalSection is called non-blocking. –  MSalters Jul 26 '11 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You guessed right. TryEnterCriticalSection() is called once, and tries to enter the critical section only once. If the critical section is locked, it returns false after the check.

In general, if a function returns a boolean or an int, the if/else clauses behaves like following:

if (function()) //function() is called once here, return result is checked
{
  //executed if function() returned true or non-zero
}
else
{
  //executed if function() returned false or zero
}
//executed whatever happens
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maybe it's because my English suxx, the main question is if I correctly understand that TryEnterCriticalSection is called only once snd isn't stick like EnterCriticalSection –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 11:59
    
It is called only once, like any other function in if(function()). Do you mean you want to know if the critical section is checked only once? then yes. –  CharlesB Jul 26 '11 at 12:00
    
yes, i meant this. thanks! –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 12:01
    
OK, edited my answer. –  CharlesB Jul 26 '11 at 12:07

TryEnterCriticalSection() does the following:

  • tries to enter a critical section
  • if that section is currently grabbed by some other thread the section is not entered and the function returns zero, otherwise
  • the section is entered and the function returns nonzero

Anyway the function never blocks. Compare it with EnterCriticalSection() that falls through if no other thread has the critical section entered and blocks if such other thread exists.

So the outcome of your code will depend on whether the critical section is entered by another thread at the moment the function is called. Don't forget to call LeaveCriticalSection() for each time when TryEnterCriticalSection() returns nonzero (succeeds).

So yes, your code is written with right assumptions.

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maybe it's because my English suxx, the main question is if I correctly understand that TryEnterCriticalSection is called only once snd isn't stick like EnterCriticalSection –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 11:58
    
@Alecs: It can be called many times by one thread but it never blocks regardless of whether the critical section is grabbed by any other thread. –  sharptooth Jul 26 '11 at 12:00
    
I have to learn to opine in English =) Thanks, I study out =) –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 12:07

Yes, your code is correct.

See more on MSDN.

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maybe it's because my English suxx, the main question is if I correctly understand that TryEnterCriticalSection is called only once snd isn't stick like EnterCriticalSection –  Alecs Jul 26 '11 at 11:58

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