Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a page which can play a video file with alternate plug-ins based on users selection. The URL encodes which video should be played.

The page is retrieved from a PHP server script. The user selects the plug-in by clicking on some AJAX links. Each link retrieves from server the required plug-in by doing an AJAX request with a Javascript function. This function must take as a parameter the video ID. On the client side I am using jQuery Javascript framework.

I would like to know which is the best practice for doing this as a design pattern. I am thinking at several alternatives:

  1. use onclick HTML attribute for the AJAX links to call the functions that retrieve content from server
  2. use jQuery $(#element).click() to map the Javascript function which retrieves content.

If I use the first alternative a can easily pass the video ID to the Javascript function:

<a id="X" href="#" onclick="retrieveXPlugin('<?php echo $id ?>')">X Plugin</a>

but the view code is mashed with events code, which is not a good practice.

The second alternative looks better, but I must bind the click event in the same PHP file like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#X').click(function() { 
        retrieveXPlugin('<?php echo $id ?>'); 
    });
}
</script>

As I figure out I cannot include the above code in a separate .js file because I need the server side PHP variable $id. The only way to do this would be to use global Javascript variables which doesn't look so good.

So, which is the best practice to organize view and events in this example and in any other? I am waiting for your suggestions.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use, for exemple, the name attribute of your link:

<a id="X" href="#" name="<?php echo $id ?>">X Plugin</a>

And in a separate .js file:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#X').click(function() { 
        retrieveXPlugin($(this).attr ('name')); 
    });
}

Or event better, like said in the comment below, is the data-* attribute (thanks Raynos), so you could do that this way:

<a id="X" href="#" data-xplugin="<?php echo $id ?>">X Plugin</a>

And in a separate .js file:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#X').click(function() { 
        retrieveXPlugin($(this).attr ('data-xplugin')); 
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Store it somewhere else. Not in the name. Maybe data-XPLugin –  Raynos Jul 26 '11 at 12:52
    
@Raynos can you explain further? data-XPLugin is not a valid html attribute as far as I know. –  Johnny5 Jul 26 '11 at 13:03
    
it's valid HTML5. The name attribute is used for server-side postbacks, and identifying elements. I believe putting this data in there is bad markup. –  Raynos Jul 26 '11 at 13:21
    
Nice, I didn't know about that, I edited the answer. –  Johnny5 Jul 26 '11 at 13:34
    
.data('xplugin') –  Raynos Jul 26 '11 at 13:41

You could simply return the anchor + script tag like so:

<a id="X" href="#" onclick="retrieveXPlugin('<?php echo $id ?>')">X Plugin</a>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#X').click(function() { 
        retrieveXPlugin('<?php echo $id ?>'); 
    });
}
</script>

And this would bind the anchor to your player.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.