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How can I check MySQL engine type for a specific database via mysql query?

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Via what? MySQL query, JDBC, ODBC...? – TC1 Jul 26 '11 at 12:38
    
via mySQL query – joe Jul 26 '11 at 12:39
5  
Databases don't have an engine type, only tables do. The server will have a default engine type for new tables, but that is set in the configuration, start up switches, or on a per-session (not per-database) basis. – Quentin Jul 26 '11 at 12:46
    
I agree Quentin – joe Jul 26 '11 at 13:32
up vote 20 down vote accepted

In MySQL, databases don't have an engine type; tables have engine types. The Friendly Manual even explicitly states:

It is important to remember that you are not restricted to using the same storage engine for an entire server or schema: you can use a different storage engine for each table in your schema.

You can query the information_schema database (substitute your database name and table name in the example):

SELECT `ENGINE` FROM `information_schema`.`TABLES`
  WHERE `TABLE_SCHEMA`='your_database_name' AND `TABLE_NAME`='your_table_name';

You can also get the value of the global environment variable storage_engine - which is only used as a default when a table is created without an engine specified, it does not affect the server in any other way:

SHOW GLOBAL VARIABLES LIKE 'storage_engine'
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I am not asking for tables :-( – joe Jul 26 '11 at 12:41
2  
@joe: You can't read what does not exist :-( Engine types only exist for individual tables. – Piskvor Jul 26 '11 at 12:52

Databases do not have engines. Tables have. You can run e.g. SHOW TABLE STATUS:

SHOW TABLE STATUS FROM mydatabase

Available engines can be found with SHOW ENGINES.


Tip: if you are the using the official command-line client rather than GUI tools you might want to use the \G command (not to be confused with lowercase \g):

Send the current statement to the server to be executed and display the result using vertical format.

... which turns this:

mysql> SHOW TABLE STATUS;
+----------------------------------+--------+---------+------------+------+----------------+-------------+-----------------+-----------
---+-----------+----------------+---------------------+-------------+------------+-------------------+----------+----------------+-----
------------------------------------------------------+
| Name                             | Engine | Version | Row_format | Rows | Avg_row_length | Data_length | Max_data_length | Index_leng
th | Data_free | Auto_increment | Create_time         | Update_time | Check_time | Collation         | Checksum | Create_options | Comm
ent                                                   |
+----------------------------------+--------+---------+------------+------+----------------+-------------+-----------------+-----------
---+-----------+----------------+---------------------+-------------+------------+-------------------+----------+----------------+-----
------------------------------------------------------+
| canal                            | InnoDB |      10 | Compact    |    0 |              0 |       16384 |               0 |
 0 |  27262976 |              1 | 2015-04-10 11:07:01 | NULL        | NULL       | utf8_general_ci   |     NULL |                |

... into this:

mysql> SHOW TABLE STATUS\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           Name: canal
         Engine: InnoDB
        Version: 10
     Row_format: Compact
           Rows: 0
 Avg_row_length: 0
    Data_length: 16384
Max_data_length: 0
   Index_length: 0
      Data_free: 27262976
 Auto_increment: 1
    Create_time: 2015-04-10 11:07:01
    Update_time: NULL
     Check_time: NULL
      Collation: utf8_general_ci
       Checksum: NULL
 Create_options:
        Comment:
*************************** 2. row ***************************
           Name: cliente
         Engine: InnoDB
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It's a verbose output, and for this reason I prefer @Piskvor's answer. (Simply a matter of preference.) – Tass Oct 9 '14 at 21:08
1  
@Tass Personal preference apart, SHOW commands are useful when you have a pre 5.0 server (happily rare nowadays) or your user has not been granted permissions to read information_schema (can happen on some shared hosting services). – Álvaro González Oct 10 '14 at 7:18
    
I do agree, it's very useful. I did append \G to SHOW TABLE STATUS and the output is much more readable. I have 54 tables, so SHOW TABLE STATUS itself is a bit garbled. – Tass Oct 10 '14 at 13:08

SHOW TABLE STATUS retrieves that kind of stuff, see the MySQL docs.

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May be you need to read question again – joe Jul 26 '11 at 12:43
    
There's no real way to guarantee that the whole DB is using only one engine. IF you're sure, you can just take the first entry from that database & assume that's the engine you need... – TC1 Jul 26 '11 at 12:48
2  
@joe -- I think you're not understanding at all. Engines are defined at the table level, not at the database level. These fine people have answered your question as best they're able. – Tass Oct 9 '14 at 21:10

the list of engines used by databases:

SELECT TABLE_SCHEMA, ENGINE FROM information_schema.TABLES group by TABLE_SCHEMA, ENGINE order by TABLE_SCHEMA, ENGINE;

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Use this command:

SHOW ENGINES\G;  

Your default engine will show as Support: DEFAULT

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