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I could not find the exact question answered on this site. The html on the page has many elements, some of them contain header cells "tr", some actual data cells "td"

Here is an example:

<tr align="center">
    <th width="63"><b>&nbsp;</b></th>
    <th width="293"><b>Partners</b></th>
    <th width="54"><b>Score</b></th>
    <th width="184"><b>Type of Partner</b></th>
</tr>            
<tr>
 <td>&nbsp;</td>
 <td height="17">Acme trucking</td>
 <td align="center">0.75</td>
 <td>Truck Carrier</td>
</tr>

I need to find all "tr" elements that contain only "td" elements, in other words, exclude all that contain "th" elements

I would also like to have even more specific xpath expression that will find only "tr" elements that contain exactly 4 "td" child elements.

If you can provide 2 separate xpath expressions for just trs that have only "td" and another one for "tr" that have exactlly 4 "td" I would really appreciate it.

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What have you got so far? –  Jon Egerton Jul 26 '11 at 12:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. //tr[td and count(td) = count(*)] or //tr[td and not(*[not(self::td)])]
  2. //tr[count(td) = 4 and count(td) = count(*)]

If you need tr with td only and without text, e.g.:

<root>
    <tr>
        Text here
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</root>

Suppose, it is not valid tr, you can use:

//tr[td and count(td) = count(*) and not(normalize-space(text()))]

It allows only whitespaces.

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Hm, not currently in a position to test, but does that indeed disregard the whitespace nodes between the td's? –  Wrikken Jul 26 '11 at 12:41
    
@Wrikken, What is "whitespace nodes"? –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 26 '11 at 12:44
    
Thanks. I'll test it today (soon). –  Dmitri Snytkine Jul 26 '11 at 12:51
    
@kirill: the enters / tabs / spaces between the <td> elements are officially textnodes, with only whitespace in them. But I don't know whether * captures them or not. I suspect not (and then your example works fine), but I'm not sure –  Wrikken Jul 26 '11 at 13:20
    
@Wrikken, * matches any node. In answer context it means: any child (not descendant) node. –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 26 '11 at 13:26

I need to find all "tr" elements that contain only "td" elements, in other words, exclude all that contain "th" elements

//tr[not(th)]

I would also like to have even more specific xpath expression that will find only "tr" elements that contain exactly 4 "td" child elements.

//tr[count(td) = 4]

This is assuming that any single tr will not have both td and th children.

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2  
It is particular case. –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 26 '11 at 17:07
1  
@Kirill, I'm not sure I understand your comment. I think you're saying that my XPaths are not as general as yours? I believe mine are correct, under reasonable interpretations of the OP's questions. If you disagree, please give details. –  LarsH Jul 26 '11 at 17:10
    
I agree with you, mostly by the first XPath. I think @Kirill is referring to your assumption about tr with only td or th, which is absolutely reasonable +1. However HTML tables may have td and th mixed up in the same row. –  empo Jul 26 '11 at 19:37

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