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What is the difference between these (bCondition == NULL) and (NULL==bCondition)?

I was going through a piece of C++ code and came across a code like

if (NULL != threadInfo)
{
  ...
  ...
}

I was just wondering is there any difference between using the expression

if (threadInfo != NULL)
{
  ...
  ...
}

what is said above. While reading the first one reads " If NULL not equals to ThreadInfo" and the second one reads "If threadInfo not equals to NULL". To me the second one makes more sense.

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1  
When you tried this, what differences did you notice? –  marto Jul 26 '11 at 12:44
4  
You'll see alot of if(Constant == variable) in c/c++ because you'll get a compile error if you leave the second = off, trying to assign to a constant left hand expression. Maybe something similar? –  asawyer Jul 26 '11 at 12:45
    
It does not make a difference, it's just a equation, you should see it more as just 2 values ( if (true == true) ) instead of variable and value. –  Sander Jul 26 '11 at 12:45
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marked as duplicate by Cody Gray, MSalters, stefaanv, Harald Scheirich, Tadeusz Kopec Jul 26 '11 at 13:14

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11 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No, there is no difference. In case of == there might be some difference. The thing is that if you accidentally write = instead of == the compiler will give an error in the first case.

if (threadInfo = NULL) //always false. The compiler will give you a warning at best

if (NULL = threadInfo) //Compiler error

I personally hate that practice and think it's better to write code that can be read in a normal human language, not Yoda language.

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6  
+1, definitely less readable, and for absolutely no gain whatsoever. If you often type = instead of == and also have nothing in place to warn you about it, then you might be having even bigger problems. –  rid Jul 26 '11 at 12:48
1  
The warning is useless, because template code generates a ton of false-positives. –  Ben Voigt Jul 26 '11 at 12:55
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It's for safety, so you don't accidentally write

threadInfo = NULL

instead of

threadInfo == NULL

For the != there's no need to do this, but it's consistent.

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5  
Turn. Compiler. Warnings. On. :| –  GManNickG Jul 26 '11 at 13:04
1  
I do have my compiler warnings on. However, I do like know the reason behind doing something rather than just doing it because others are doing it. I just stated the reason - which is a valid one - I didn't say you should not have warnings on... –  Luchian Grigore Jul 26 '11 at 13:06
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If threadInfo is of a type that overrides operator !=, and the owner of that class has not provided a symmetric free function that handles the case where the two arguments are swapped, there might be a difference (there might also be a need to fire that programmer).

Otherwise, it's a matter of taste. Probably it will be preferred by people who write if(42 == answer) instead of if(answer == 42) -- this protects you from mistyping an assignment operator instead of an equals check. But since modern compilers warn you when you do that, it's debatable whether this approach offers anything.

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But the difference is that NULL != threadInfo won't compile, since int doesn't have a operator!= for the threadInfo type. I don't think there can be differences if threadInfo is a pointer type? –  Douglas Leeder Jul 26 '11 at 12:55
    
@Douglas: There might be a free-function operator !=(int, threadInfo_TYPE) defined in the same namespace as threadInfo_TYPE, in which case it will be automatically brought into consideration due to Koenig Lookup. –  Jon Jul 26 '11 at 13:03
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There is no difference. The point of writing NULL != ... is that if you instead make a typo and write NULL = ... the code won't compile. If you had ... = NULL it could be a valid assignment and the error could go unnoticed (but most compilers detect this and warn you). Somebody once tried to insert a backdoor into the Linux kernel using this technique.

Also note that most persons don't code like that.

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There is no difference, EXCEPT that the first option cannot be mistyped as:

if (threadInfo = NULL)
{
    ...
    ...
}

And some people don't know how to use compiler switches to check this (and some compilers don't have them).

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No difference, this is so called Yoda coding convention.

if (NULL != threadInfo)

is equivalent to

if (threadInfo != NULL)

and to

if (threadInfo)
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This is usually used as a convention, and has no distinct meaning by itself.

Because assignment occurs to lvals, and NULL is unassignable, this protects against the dreaded threadInfo = NULL when you meant threadInfo == NULL or threadInfo != NULL bug.

For more detail, see this wikipedia article section on left-hand comparisons

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Both do the same thing. It is a style convention that was used to avoid typing mistakes as:

if (value=NULL) // assignment instead of == operator 
{ 
}
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These are exact equivalents in terms of logic.

The second is more intutive, when one may see the first is seen as more safe as it doesn't allows writing (threadInfo = NULL) erroneously, leading to a bug.

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Null is a reference in the memory contains nothing but that nothing have an address to access it.

By that you can make a comparisons behind null to check if a certain object have a value or nothing.

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I don't see any difference. However, the practice of writing NULL == someVar would save you from writing NULL = someVar if you forget typing the second =.

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