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I think I've found something which C# and Ruby can do but Python can not

in C#:

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    new Thread(() => { Console.Write(i+" "); }).Start();
Console.ReadLine();

in Ruby:

for i in 0...100
    Thread.start{
        print i + ''
    }
end

gets

Any ideas? Could you rewrite the above code in python? the output should be similar to C# and Ruby: has duplicate numbers.

Edit
The output is 100 times of print, with duplicate numbers. If you define a class or a new method, you only get 100 times of print without duplicate numbers. I know getting duplicate numbers is meaningless, I just want to use python to achieve the same effect as C# and ruby.

sample output of C#:

3 3 3 3 5 7 8 8 10 10 12 12 13 14 17 17 17 18 20 20 22 23 24 24 25 28 28 29 29 3
1 31 33 33 34 36 38 38 38 41 41 41 42 44 45 45 46 49 49 50 50 52 52 55 56 56 56
58 59 59 60 61 64 64 64 66 66 67 68 69 72 72 72 73 74 76 76 78 78 81 81 82 83 84
 84 86 86 87 89 89 90 93 94 94 95 95 97 97 99 99 100

sample output of Ruby:

99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
9999999999999999999999999999999999999999

Why do I want duplicate numbers:
the output of the C# and ruby code have duplicate numbers. That's because, the main thread are changing the value of i, so some children threads might print the same number. Main thread and the children threads are referencing to the same variable i. Sometimes this is useful: the main thread changes the variable, the children threads all get updated variable. But How could we do this in Python?

share|improve this question
1  
Extends threading.Thread sounds like a much better design pattern than the alternatives. It's nicely encapsulated, and very clean. –  S.Lott Jul 26 '11 at 13:11
    
What do you mean with duplicate numbers? You mean you get "1" 100 times, then "2" 100 times, etc. or what? –  agf Jul 26 '11 at 13:34
    
@agf, I changed WriteLine(i) to Write(i+" "). an example output of C#: 3 3 3 3 5 7 8 8 10 10 12 12 13 14 17 17 17 18 20 20 22 23 24 24 25 28 28 29 29 3 1 31 33 33 34 36 38 38 38 41 41 41 42 44 45 45 46 49 49 50 50 52 52 55 56 56 56 58 59 59 60 61 64 64 64 66 66 67 68 69 72 72 72 73 74 76 76 78 78 81 81 82 83 84 84 86 86 87 89 89 90 93 94 94 95 95 97 97 99 99 100. –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 13:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want the different threads to sometimes see the same value of i then you need to pass in a mutable object and mutate it:

import threading

def action(arg):
    print arg[0],

mutable = [0]
for i in range(100):
    mutable[0] = i
    threading.Thread(target=action, args=(mutable,)).start()

This has nothing whatsoever to do with whether or not you define a separate class for the thread, it is purely down to how you share the value between the threads. A global variable would work to mess up your threading in the same way.

Sample output:

0 1 2 3 5 5 6 8 9 9 11 11 12 1314 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3
0 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 39 39 40 41 43 44 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 53 54 55 56
5758 59 60 61 62 64 65 6666 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 8
4 85 86 87 89 90 90 92 93 93 94 95 96 9898 99
share|improve this answer
    
Sometime it's not "mess", it is useful. If really want they share the same variable –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 14:00
    
In Python you just have to share the same object instead of sharing the same variable. This is usually also true in other languages as you want to be sure there is appropriate locking around access to the value: Python's GIL ensures you don't have to worry about the locking for simple objects but you should still worry for anything mutable. –  Duncan Jul 26 '11 at 14:05

Well, actually you can:

>>> import threading
>>> def target():
...     print 123
...
>>> threading.Thread(target=target).start()
123

Your example would look like next:

>>> def target(i):
...     print i
...
>>> for i in xrange(100):
...     threading.Thread(target=target, args=(i,)).start()
...
0
1
2
3
<and so on>
share|improve this answer
    
Not a rewrite of the ruby or C# code. But anyway, I know it is possible to use multithreading without defining a new class in Python. thanks. –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 13:14
    
@Tyler So provide output of ruby or C# code. –  Roman Bodnarchuk Jul 26 '11 at 13:15
    
All the threads will be writing to stdout in parallel, the output will be garbled. You need to put a lock around the print if you expect clean output, but even then the order is not predictable. –  FogleBird Jul 26 '11 at 13:16
2  
I don't know what you mean by "not the same output" but I wanted to note you can even declare it inline like in Ruby and C# if you really want to (in Python 2.6 or later with from __future__ import print_function or in Python 3): threading.Thread(target=(lambda i: print(i)), args=(i,)).start() –  agf Jul 26 '11 at 13:19
1  
@agf, I didn't know that it could be done as inline. It is said that lambda in python had to be a single expression(not a statement). –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 13:22

In Python:

import threading

def action(arg):
    print arg

for i in range(100):
    threading.Thread(target=action, args=(i,)).start()
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, without a new class, but with a new method. much better. –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 13:18
    
@Tyler: You mean extending threading.Thread and redefining the run method, sure it's possible but depending on the use case, eg. in this example it will be an overkill to do that. –  mouad Jul 26 '11 at 13:23
    
Yes, a class is overskill. But we'd better omit that method too. Because something does matter. run the C# and ruby code, you get a lot of duplicate prints. That's because they use inline closure instead of a new method. –  Tyler Long Jul 26 '11 at 13:27

Edited again:

I think I've found something which C# and Ruby can do but Python can not

No this has duplicate numbers and looks very much the same like your Ruby/C# code.

import threading
import sys

for i in xrange(100):
    threading.Thread(target=lambda: sys.stdout.write('{0}\n'.format(i))).start()

-

14
15
17
17
18
19
20
share|improve this answer
    
I think your answer is right. just not so pythonic. Yes I know the pythonic way could not produce duplicate numbers, so you have to do it this way. thank you! –  Tyler Long Aug 3 '11 at 10:01

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