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Here is my table structure:

CREATE TABLE EVENT (
 EventID INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 EventDate DATETIME DEFAULT NULL,
 Description VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (EventID)
);

And data:

INSERT INTO event VALUES (1, '2011-01-01 00:00:00', 'Event 1');
INSERT INTO event VALUES (2, '2011-03-01 00:00:00', 'Event 2');
INSERT INTO event VALUES (3, '2011-06-01 00:00:00', 'Event 3');
INSERT INTO event VALUES (4, '2011-09-01 00:00:00', 'Event 4');

And query:

SELECT *
FROM EVENT
WHERE EventDate BETWEEN '2011-02-01' AND '2011-03-31'

And output:

2    2011-03-01 00:00:00    Event 2
# 1 row returned

I want inject empty dates in the result like so:

NULL 2011-02-01 00:00:00    NULL
NULL 2011-02-02 00:00:00    NULL
NULL 2011-02-03 00:00:00    NULL
.
.
.
NULL 2011-02-28 00:00:00    NULL
2    2011-03-01 00:00:00    Event 2
NULL 2011-03-02 00:00:00    NULL
.
.
.
NULL 2011-03-31 00:00:00    NULL
# 59 rows returned -- 28 for FEB and 31 for MAR

I'll want to avoid any hard coding; instead, I need a very flexible solution that adapts itself to the specified dates.

share|improve this question
1  
You may want to avoid 'hard coding', but efficiently creating a list of dates, comparing, inserting (and maybe even then deleting the list) will be much faster than attempting to calculate the individual dates. –  MatBailie Jul 26 '11 at 13:47
    
@Dems: you're probably right, I didn't think of that –  Salman A Jul 26 '11 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An auxiliary calendar table will work well. The simplest possible calendar table is a single column of dates.

create table calendar (
    cal_date date primary key
);

You can use a spreadsheet or SQL to populate it. An outer join on it will bring in the dates that don't exist in your data. Limit permissions with GRANT and REVOKE, and use whatever means necessary to make sure that the dates you expect to be in there are actually in there. I run a daily report on my server that makes sure there are 'n' rows, and verifies the earliest and latest dates.

On some platforms, you can generate a series of dates on the fly, and either use it directly or in a CTE. PostgreSQL has functions for that; I don't know whether MySQL does. They're not hard to write, though, if you want to roll your own.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 : Comparing against a pre-created table is going to be sooooo much faster than writing code to calculate the individual missing dates. –  MatBailie Jul 26 '11 at 13:45
    
@Dems: It's also inflexible. It realy depends on the variance of the date range. –  pablochan Jul 26 '11 at 13:55
    
@pablochan : I wouldn't say that it's inflexible. The space taken by a calendar of 100 years is around 16KB; the time to create it on the fly if necessary is trivial; it can be customised to have fields such as DayOfWeek, BankHoliday, Opening Hours, etc; it can be a calendar of days, hours, weeks, months, etc; you can do almost anythign you like with it. And it is a Massive performance boost in nearly every case. Whatever it's costs, flexibility is not one of them. –  MatBailie Jul 26 '11 at 14:43

maybe you need an pivot table, Take a look at that

pivot table schema

name: pivot columns: {i : datatype int}

Populate

create foo table

schema foo

name: foo column: value datatype varchar

insert into foo
values('0'),
values('1'),
values('2'),
values('3'),
values('4'),
values('5'),
values('6'),
values('7'),
values('8'),
values('9');

- insert 100 values
insert into pivot
select concat(a.value, a.value)
from foo a, foo b

- insert 1000 values
insert into pivot
select concat(a.value, b.value, c.value)
from foo a, foo b, foo c

your query

SELECT 
 Event.EventId,
 case when EventDate is null then DATE_ADD(periods.periodstart, INTERVAL auxtable.i DAY)
 else EventDate  end,
 Description

FROM
(
  select id, min(EventDate ) periodstart, max(EventDate) periodend,

  DATEDIFF(max(EventDate),min(EventDate )) as days
  FROM EVEN
  WHERE EventDate BETWEEN '2011-02-01' AND '2011-03-31'
) periods

inner join     

(
  select *
  from pivot
  where i >= 0 and i < 31 //max one month change with your needs
)auxtable
on auxtable.i < periods.days

left join Event
on Event.EventDate = DATE_ADD(periods.periodstart, INTERVAL auxtable.i DAY)
share|improve this answer
    
It sort of worked but overly complicated. Plus it requires me to populate table of sequential numbers. –  Salman A Jul 27 '11 at 9:14
    
well, that is an mystic technique from more pure sql. That was adopted by sql server with the instruction "pivot" never i needed read about that but not doubt that be more simple but i prefer portable sql though then I'll keep an eye –  Carlos Cocom Jul 27 '11 at 16:41

I'm fairly sure this is impossible in pure SQL, so your choices are:

  • use a stored procedure/function
  • do this in the app code, which seems pretty straight forward
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