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I have some Backbone.js code that bind a click event to a button, and I want to unbind it after clicked, the code sample as below:

var AppView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el:$("#app-view"),
    initialize:function(){
        _.bindAll(this,"cancel");
    },

    events:{
        "click .button":"cancel"
    },

    cancel:function(){
        console.log("do something...");
        this.$(".button").unbind("click");
    }
});
var view = new AppView();

However the unbind is not working, I tried several different way and end up binding event in initialize function with jQuery but not in Backbone.events model.

Anyone know why the unbind is not working?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The reason it doesn't work is that Backbonejs doesn't bind the event on the DOM Element .button itself. It delegates the event like this:

$(this.el).delegate('.button', 'click', yourCallback);

(docs: http://api.jquery.com/delegate)

You have to undelegate the event like this:

$(this.el).undelegate('.button', 'click');

(docs: http://api.jquery.com/undelegate)

So your code should look like:

var AppView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el:$("#app-view"),
    initialize:function(){
        _.bindAll(this,"cancel");
    },

    events:{
        "click .button":"cancel"
    },

    cancel:function(){
        console.log("do something...");
        $(this.el).undelegate('.button', 'click');
    }
});
var view = new AppView();

Another (maybe better) way to solve this is to create a state attribute like this.isCancelable now everytime the cancel function is called you check if this.isCancelable is set to true, if yes you proceed your action and set this.isCancelable to false.

Another button could reactivate the cancel button by setting this.isCancelable to true without binding/unbinding the click event.

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You could solve this another way

var AppView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el:$("#app-view"),
    initialize:function(){
        _.bindAll(this,"cancel");
    },

    events:{
        "click .button":"do"
    },

    do:_.once(function(){
        console.log("do something...");
    })
});
var view = new AppView();

underscore.js once function ensures that the wrapped function can only be called once.

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1  
I like this way better than having to undelegate the event. Much simpler and cleaner, thanks for this. –  Bryan Bailliache Jul 27 '11 at 12:42
    
Thanks for this tip. –  v1r00z Jun 4 '12 at 21:59

There is an even easier way, assuming you want to undelegate all events:

this.undelegateEvents();
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Wow! i have been searching this for lot of days –  Prabakaran Raja May 3 at 5:30

I like bradgonesurfing answer. However I came across a problem using the _.once approach when multiple instances of the View are created. Namely that _.once would restrict the function to be called only once for all objects of that type i.e. the restriction was at the class level rather than instance level.

I handled the problem this way:

App.Views.MyListItem = Backbone.View.extend({
  events: {
    'click a.delete' : 'onDelete'
  },

  initialize: function() {
    _.bindAll(this);
    this.deleteMe = _.once(this.triggerDelete);
  },

  // can only be called once
  triggerDelete: function() {
    console.log("triggerDelete");
    // do stuff
  },

  onDelete:(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    this.deleteMe();
  })
});

Hopefully this will help someone

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I had a problem where my equivalent of this.triggerDelete was firing on initialize. Maybe the event model has changed in Underscore a bit since this answer. In any event, I fixed that by modifying that initialize code to: this.deleteMe = _.once(function() {this.triggerDelete;}); –  Matt Dec 31 '12 at 16:04

you can simply use object.off, the code below is work for me

initialize:function () {

    _.bindAll(this, 'render', 'mouseover', 'mouseout', 'delete', 'dropout' , 'unbind_mouseover', 'bind_mouseover');
    .......

},

events: {
    'mouseover': 'mouseover',
    'unbind_mouseover': 'unbind_mouseover',
    'bind_mouseover': 'bind_mouseover',
    .....
},

mouseover: function(){
    $(this.el).addClass('hover');
    this.$('.popout').show();
},

unbind_mouseover: function(){
    console.log('unbind_mouseover');
    $(this.el).off('mouseover');
},
bind_mouseover: function(){
    ........
},
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I created an extended View class that has methods for delegate and undelegate specific events

class View extends Backbone.View            
    constructor: (options) ->
        @eventsChanges = _.clone(@events)
        super options

    enable: (name) ->           
        for key, value of @events
            @eventsChanges[key] = value  if key is name

        @delegateEvents @eventsChanges

    disable: (name) ->      
        for key, value of @eventsChanges
            delete @eventsChanges[key]  if key is name

        @delegateEvents @eventsChanges

for example, you could do:

 class AppView extends View
        events: 
               "click #send": "send"

        send: ->
               @disable "click #send" #only enable after save complete
               @model.save complete: => @enable "click #send"
share|improve this answer
    
Downvote because of CoffeeScript, the question was asked for Javascript and should have an answer in the same language, IMO :-) –  Soroush Hakami Jan 30 at 12:04
    
What he said :) –  Mackelito Jan 30 at 12:07

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