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I start to learn AnyEvent and have some trobles with it. I totally misunderstood how its possible to get asynchronous profit, fe :

#!/usr/bin/env perl

package LatencySub;

use strict;
use warnings;
use AnyEvent;

# sub for emulate latency - is it right way?
sub do_delay{
    my ($name, $delay) = (@_);
    my $cv = AE::cv;
    my $timer = AE::timer $delay, 0, sub { $cv->send() };
    $cv->recv;
    return $name.' proceed, delay is '.$delay;
};


package main;

use 5.12.0;
use warnings;

use Smart::Comments;

use AnyEvent;

my @list = (
    { name => 'first', delay => 1  },
    { name => 'second', delay => 1 },
    { name => 'third', delay => 2 }
);

sub process_cb {
    my ( $name, $delay, $cb ) = @_;
    my $result = LatencySub::do_delay( $name, $delay );
    $cb->($result);
}

my %result;

my $cv = AE::cv;
# outer loop
$cv->begin (sub { shift->send (\%result) });

my $before_time =  AE::time;
### foreach start...
foreach my $entity (@list) {
            $cv->begin;
            process_cb ( 
                                $entity->{'name'},
                                $entity->{'delay'},
                                sub {
                                     $result{$entity->{'name'}} = shift;
                                     $cv->end;
                                }
            );
     }
### foreach end...

$cv->end;
my $time_all = AE::time - $before_time;

### $time_all
### %result

At output I got:

### foreach start...

### foreach end...

### $time_all: '4.02105116844177'
### %result: {
###            first => 'first proceed, delay is 1',
###            second => 'second proceed, delay is 1',
###            third => 'third proceed, delay is 2'
###          }

All delay sum (1+1+2) eq $time_all - 4 seconds. So, no profit at all.

Why is it and how I can (and is it possible?) create "right" callback?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use condvars except to block your top-level program while waiting for events to complete. Using condvars makes it very difficult to reuse code; any function that has a condvar internally can never be safely used in a program that has another function that has a condvar in it. (This is not true if you never call recv and only use cb. But still... it's dangerous and not for those that don't know what they're doing.)

My rule: if the filename ends .pm, no condvars!

If you want to run multiple things in parallel and run some more code once all the results are available, try Event::Join:

sub delay($$) {
    AnyEvent->timer( after => $_[0], cb => $_[1] );
}

my $join = Event::Join->new(
    on_completion => sub { say "Everything is done" }
    events        => [qw/t1 t2 t3/],
);

delay 1, $join->event_sender_for('t1');
delay 2, $join->event_sender_for('t2');
delay 3, $join->event_sender_for('t3');

Then, after 3 seconds, you'll see "everything is done". Event::Join is like begin and end on condvars, but can never block your program. So it's easy to reuse code that uses it. Also, events are named, so you can collect results as a hash instead of just calling a callback when other callbacks are called.

share|improve this answer

The call $cv->recv will block until ->send is called, so do_delay() takes $delay secs to return.

Here is an example of spawning three threads and waiting for all of them to complete:

use strict;
use warnings;
use AnyEvent;

sub make_delay {
    my ($name, $delay, $cv) = (@_);
    $cv->begin;
    return AE::timer $delay, 0, sub { warn "done with $name\n"; $cv->end };
}

my $cv = AE::cv;

my @timers = (make_delay("t1", 3, $cv),
              make_delay("t2", 5, $cv),
              make_delay("t3", 4, $cv)
);

$cv->recv;
share|improve this answer
    
Aha! It's more like what I want. I think its very important to understand why I need there "$cv->begin; my $timer = AE::timer $delay, 0, sub { warn "done with $name\n"; $cv->end }; return $timer;" (just for simples view) return AE::timer object? –  Meettya Jul 26 '11 at 16:15
1  
See the documentation for $cv->begin in perldoc AnyEvent. $cv->begin increments a counter and $cv->end decrements the counter and fires the condition variable if the counter reaches 0. Also, you need to save the AE::timer objects so they don't go out of scope. –  perlman Jul 27 '11 at 16:25

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