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I have a query:

SELECT emp.empno , emp.ename , emp.job , emp.sal , dept.dname , dept.loc 
  FROM emp , 
       dept 
 WHERE emp.ename = 'SMITH';

Please tell me why this is displaying all the Records , as i am expecting only one record ?

     EMPNO ENAME      JOB              SAL DNAME          LOC
---------- ---------- --------- ---------- -------------- -------------
      7369 SMITH      CLERK            800 ACCOUNTING     NEW YORK
      7369 SMITH      CLERK            800 RESEARCH       DALLAS
      7369 SMITH      CLERK            800 SALES          CHICAGO
      7369 SMITH      CLERK            800 OPERATIONS     BOSTON
      7369 SMITH      CLERK            800 CREDIT
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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The reason is because your query lacks JOIN criteria to link the two tables, so the result will be a cartesian product. Every EMP record will have a copy of every row in the DEPT table...

Your query uses ANSI-89 join syntax, which requires the criteria to be in the WHERE clause:

SELECT e.empno, e.ename, e.job, e.sal, d.dname, d.loc 
  FROM EMP e, 
       DEPT d
 WHERE d.deptno = e.deptno
   AND e.ename = 'SMITH'

But it would be preferable to use the ANSI-92 format:

SELECT e.empno, e.ename, e.job, e.sal, d.dname, d.loc 
  FROM EMP e 
  JOIN DEPT d ON d.deptno = e.deptno
 WHERE e.ename = 'SMITH'
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Using ANSI syntax makes it a little easier to remeber your JOIN clauses. –  RedFilter Jul 26 '11 at 14:36
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You need to join the tables, not select from each. The DB doesn't know the relation to emp and dept without a join.

Try:

select emp.empno , emp.ename , emp.job , emp.sal , dept.dname , dept.loc from emp inner
join dept on emp.deptno = dept.deptno where 
emp.ename = 'SMITH';
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Because you have not specified how to join emp and dept, and so have a Cartesian product (all possible combinations).

Try:

select emp.empno , emp.ename , emp.job , emp.sal , dept.dname , dept.loc
from emp
join dept on dept.deptno = emp.deptno
where emp.ename = 'SMITH';
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It is because of your FROM emp , dept clause. I expect that 'SMITH' only belongs in one department and you really need to do a JOIN instead.

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Because this is the result of a cross-join between these two tables (emp, dept). You are missing join condition, i.e.

where dept.deptno = emp.deptno and emp.ename = 'SMITH';
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You need to join your emp and dept tables, as you are currently getting 1 row for each dept as there is no restriction applied to that table.

There is probably an emp.deptid column on the emp table, or some other joining table in the database.

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