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I would like to read a very very large file into a JavaScript array in node.js.

So if the file is like this:

first line
two 
three
...
...

I would have the array:

['first line','two','three', ... , ... ] 

The function would look like this:

var array = load(filename); 

Therefore the idea of loading it all as a string and then split it is not acceptable.

share|improve this question
    
This question needs some serious editing and cleanup. It says read a text file into an array, but when you read all the answers and comments, it really means read a text file one line at a time. For that question @zswang has the best answer so far. –  Jess Nov 27 '13 at 3:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If you can fit the final data into an array then wouldn't you also be able to fit it in a string and split it, as has been suggested? In any case if you would like to process the file one line at a time you can also try something like this:

var fs = require('fs');

function readLines(input, func) {
  var remaining = '';

  input.on('data', function(data) {
    remaining += data;
    var index = remaining.indexOf('\n');
    while (index > -1) {
      var line = remaining.substring(0, index);
      remaining = remaining.substring(index + 1);
      func(line);
      index = remaining.indexOf('\n');
    }
  });

  input.on('end', function() {
    if (remaining.length > 0) {
      func(remaining);
    }
  });
}

function func(data) {
  console.log('Line: ' + data);
}

var input = fs.createReadStream('lines.txt');
readLines(input, func);

EDIT: (in response to comment by phopkins) I think (at least in newer versions) substring does not copy data but creates a special SlicedString object (from a quick glance at the v8 source code). In any case here is a modification that avoids the mentioned substring (tested on a file several megabytes worth of "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy"):

function readLines(input, func) {
  var remaining = '';

  input.on('data', function(data) {
    remaining += data;
    var index = remaining.indexOf('\n');
    var last  = 0;
    while (index > -1) {
      var line = remaining.substring(last, index);
      last = index + 1;
      func(line);
      index = remaining.indexOf('\n', last);
    }

    remaining = remaining.substring(last);
  });

  input.on('end', function() {
    if (remaining.length > 0) {
      func(remaining);
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. to answer your question: no, the string would be too large. –  chacko Jul 26 '11 at 16:29
5  
I tried this on files of around 2MB or so and it was painfully slow, much slower than reading in the files synchronously to a string. I think the issue is the remaining = remaining.substring line. Node's "data" might give you a lot at a time, and doing that copy for every line quickly becomes O(n^2). –  phopkins May 18 '12 at 2:08

Synchronous:

var fs = require('fs');
var array = fs.readFileSync('file.txt').toString().split("\n");
for(i in array) {
    console.log(array[i]);
}

Asynchronous:

var fs = require('fs');
fs.readFile('file.txt', function(err, data) {
    if(err) throw err;
    var array = data.toString().split("\n");
    for(i in array) {
        console.log(array[i]);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
4  
thanks. Unfortunately I had to edit my question. I mean how to read a massively large file. Reading it all in a string is not acceptable. –  chacko Jul 26 '11 at 15:11
2  
Simple awesome for their simplicity!!! –  diosney Jul 27 '12 at 18:13
    
Maybe should not make i global and use for(var i in ... instead? –  bababa Oct 3 '13 at 1:58
    
Just what I needed. Simple and quick. –  Hcabnettek Apr 30 at 17:31
    
This is useful for some of us! –  Indolering May 21 at 3:23
var fs = require('fs');
var filename = process.argv[2];
require('readline').createInterface({
    input: fs.createReadStream(filename),
    terminal: false
}).on('line', function(line){
   console.log('Line: ' + line);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, clean answer. –  AlexMA Mar 4 at 15:19

With a BufferedReader, but the function should be asynchronous:

var load = function (file, cb){
    var lines = [];
    new BufferedReader (file, { encoding: "utf8" })
        .on ("error", function (error){
            cb (error, null);
        })
        .on ("line", function (line){
            lines.push (line);
        })
        .on ("end", function (){
            cb (null, lines);
        })
        .read ();
};

load ("file", function (error, lines){
    if (error) return console.log (error);
    console.log (lines);
});
share|improve this answer

This is a variation on the answer above by @mtomis.

It creates a stream of lines. It emits 'data' and 'end' events, allowing you to handle the end of the stream.

var events = require('events');

var LineStream = function (input) {
    var remaining = '';

    input.on('data', function (data) {
        remaining += data;
        var index = remaining.indexOf('\n');
        var last = 0;
        while (index > -1) {
            var line = remaining.substring(last, index);
            last = index + 1;
            this.emit('data', line);
            index = remaining.indexOf('\n', last);
        }
        remaining = remaining.substring(last);
    }.bind(this));

    input.on('end', function() {
        if (remaining.length > 0) {
            this.emit('data', remaining);
        }
        this.emit('end');
    }.bind(this));
}

LineStream.prototype = new events.EventEmitter;

Use it as a wrapper:

var lineInput = new LineStream(input);

lineInput.on('data', function (line) {
    // handle line
});

lineInput.on('end', function() {
    // wrap it up
});
share|improve this answer
    
You will end with having events shared between instances. var EventEmitter = require('events').EventEmitter; var util = require('util'); function GoodEmitter() { EventEmitter.call(this); } util.inherits(GoodEmitter, EventEmitter); –  CTAPbIu_MABP May 25 at 8:55
    
What instances are you talking about exactly? –  oferei May 26 at 20:54
    
try to create var li1 = new LineStream(input1), li2 = new LineStream(input2); then count how many times 'end' is fired for each one –  CTAPbIu_MABP May 29 at 16:32
    
tried it. 'end' was fired once for each instance. var fs = require('fs'); var input1 = fs.createReadStream('text.txt'); var ls1 = new LineStream(input1); ls1.on('data', function (line) { console.log('1:line=' + line); }); ls1.on('end', function (line) { console.log('1:fin'); }); var input2 = fs.createReadStream('text.txt'); var ls2 = new LineStream(input2); ls2.on('data', function (line) { console.log('2:line=' + line); }); ls2.on('end', function (line) { console.log('2:fin'); }); output: each line in the text file was fired once for each instance. so was 'end'. –  oferei Jun 1 at 7:41

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