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In Firefox, I've got several objects that I need to trigger an event when a particular property of each is changed. I'm using object.watch(), however when I return the value of the property that was changed using "this", it returns the old value the first time, and "undefined" the second and subsequent times:

var myObject = {
        "aProperty": 1
    };

function propChanged(prop) {
    alert(prop);
}

myObject.watch("aProperty", function () {
    propChanged(this.aProperty);
});

myObject.aProperty = 2;//alerts "1"
myObject.aProperty = 3;//alerts "undefined"

The reason I can't just say alert(myObject.aProperty) is because this is meant to be a dynamic code that will apply the event handler to several, possibly unknown objects.

I'm just unsure exactly how to dynamically get the new value of the property using the watch method. I'm setting up a prototype for IE for this, so I'm not worried about it not working there. I just need to understand "this" and how it applies to the watch method's owner.

Edit>>

Here's the new code I'm using for cross browser, including the IE et al prototype:

var myObject = {};

if (!Object.prototype.watch) {
    Object.prototype.watch = function (prop, handler) {
        var oldval = this[prop], newval = oldval,
        getter = function () {
            return newval;
        },
        setter = function (val) {
            oldval = newval;
            return newval = handler.call(this, prop, oldval, val);
        };
        if (delete this[prop]) { // can't watch constants
            if (Object.defineProperty) // ECMAScript 5
                Object.defineProperty(this, prop, {
                    get: getter,
                    set: setter
                });
            else if (Object.prototype.__defineGetter__ && Object.prototype.__defineSetter__) { // legacy
                Object.prototype.__defineGetter__.call(this, prop, getter);
                Object.prototype.__defineSetter__.call(this, prop, setter);
            }
        }
    };
}

if (!Object.prototype.unwatch) {
    Object.prototype.unwatch = function (prop) {
        var val = this[prop];
        delete this[prop]; // remove accessors
        this[prop] = val;
    };
}


function propChanged(t, p, o, n) {
    alert(o);
}

Object.defineProperty(myObject, "aProperty", {value: 2,
    writable: true,
    enumerable: true,
    configurable: true});

myObject.watch("aProperty", propChanged);

myObject.aProperty = 3; //alerts 3
myObject.aProperty = 4;  //alerts 4 (n is undefined in propChanged?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to return the value you want the property to have from the function you pass to watch.

myObject.watch("aProperty", function (prop, oldval, newval) {
    propChanged(newVal);
    return newVal;
});

should do it.

See the MDN docs for a full detail of the function but the relevant bit is

Watches for assignment to a property named prop in this object, calling handler(prop, oldval, newval) whenever prop is set and storing the return value in that property. A watchpoint can filter (or nullify) the value assignment, by returning a modified newval (or by returning oldval).

EDIT

Your edited code might work better this way

Object.prototype.watch = function (prop, handler) {
    var fromPrototype = !Object.hasOwnProperty.call(this, prop),
    val = this[prop],
    getter = function () {
        return fromPrototype ? Object.getPrototypeOf(this)[prop] : val;
    },
    setter = function (newval) {
        fromPrototype = false;
        return val = handler.call(this, prop, val, newval);
    };
    if (delete this[prop]) { // can't watch constants
        if (Object.defineProperty) { // ECMAScript 5
            Object.defineProperty(this, prop, {
                get: getter,
                set: setter,
                configurable: true,
                enumerable: true
            });
        } else if (Object.prototype.__defineGetter__ && Object.prototype.__defineSetter__) { // legacy
            Object.prototype.__defineGetter__.call(this, prop, getter);
            Object.prototype.__defineSetter__.call(this, prop, setter);
        }
    }
};
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I don't think I'm following you. I thought that's what I was doing. –  Dexter Jul 26 '11 at 14:58
    
Ah.. thanks. I was just digging through the method's getter and setter and saw that I might be able to add arguments to the handler. You just showed me what I was looking for! thanks! –  Dexter Jul 26 '11 at 15:01
    
@Dexter, you're welcome. Btw, if you can hook in at property creation time, most of the stuff you can do with watch can be done cross-browser (for recent browsers incl. FF4) via defineProperty and even if you can't, you will be able to intercept method calls via wiki.ecmascript.org/doku.php?id=harmony:proxies which I believe is available in some of the Firefox nightlies. –  Mike Samuel Jul 26 '11 at 15:07
    
I just edited to add the new code I'm using, which is somewhat working. It seems IE and FF are both firing Object.prototype.__defineSetter__.call(this, prop, setter); instead of newval = handler.call(this, prop, oldval, val);, so I can't get the old value yet. I don't think I understand this prototype as well as I thought I did. I have some reading to do. –  Dexter Jul 26 '11 at 15:27
    
@Dexter, please see my edits. Probably not 100%, but the draft you put up might have problems with inherited properties and with changes in enumerability/configurability. –  Mike Samuel Jul 26 '11 at 15:52
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