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This is probably a newbie's escaping problem. I'm trying run command in a for loop like this

$ for SET in `ls ../../mybook/WS/wsc_production/`; do ~/sandbox/scripts/ftype-switch/typesort.pl /media/mybook/WS/wsc_production/$SET ./wsc_sorter/$SET | tee -a sorter.log; done;

but I end up with sorter.log being empty. (I'm sure there is some output.) If I escape the pipe symbol (\|), I end up with no sorter.log at all.

What am I doing wrong?

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.1.5(1)-release (i486-pc-linux-gnu)

Edit: Oops, /media/mybook/ fell asleep, so there actually was no output. The code was correct in the first place. Thanks to all for comments, though.

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what is the output of do ~/sandbox/scripts/ftype-switch/typesort.pl /media/mybook/WS/wsc_production/$SET ./wsc_sorter/$SET? (replacing $SET with a valid value, of course) –  KevinDTimm Jul 26 '11 at 14:55
    
(1) Why are you doubling the backtick characters? (2) If there is some output you ought see it on the terminal. If you don't see any, the log will be empty. –  n.m. Jul 26 '11 at 14:59
    
you need to reread how to format here on S.O. You're better off to remove the outermost '`' chars surrounding your command, and use 4 spaces to indent to indicate code block. Also do you really mean to have 2 backquotes before ls ../../mybook/WS/...? Presumably you're trying to work around the inline formatting for code. Also please note that backquotes have been deprecated since at least 1993, so start using $(cmd) for command substitution ;-), OK? Good luck. –  shellter Jul 26 '11 at 15:00
    
My deepest apologies, the problem was somewhere else and my script actually did not output anything at all. Now it works. @shellter: thanks though, I'll try to ban my self use of backticks ;-) –  Alois Mahdal Jul 26 '11 at 16:19
    
People took time to help you, deleting this question would penalize them. You can answer your own question with your solution (a paragraph is fine) and, after the waiting period, select it as the correct answer (in order to close out this question). –  Will Jul 27 '11 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

You're using tee, so if there is output, you'd see it on your terminal. What do you see?

If you see output, it's probably stderr you're seeing, so you might want to redirect it:

dir1=$HOME/sandbox/scripts/ftype-switch
dir2=/media/mybook/WS/wsc_production
for SET in ../../mybook/WS/wsc_production/*; do 
  $dir1/typesort.pl $dir2/$SET ./wsc_sorter/$SET 2>&1 | tee -a sorter.log
done
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Glenn said it well. I would like to offer a different angle: you can move the 'tee' command outside of the for loop. The advantage to this approach is tee is invoked only once:

dir1=$HOME/sandbox/scripts/ftype-switch
dir2=/media/mybook/WS/wsc_production
for SET in ../../mybook/WS/wsc_production/*; do 
  $dir1/typesort.pl $dir2/$SET ./wsc_sorter/$SET 2>&1 
done | tee -a sorter.log
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Thanks, that could save me some precious time :) –  Alois Mahdal Jul 26 '11 at 16:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

My deepest apologies, the problem was somewhere else and my script actually did not output anything at all. Now it works.

Two reasons why I got the illusion that the problem is in escaping:

  • of course, lack of confidence in bash scripting, which is effect of lack of knowledge and experience
  • and also, lack of attention--it did not come into my mind that the disk on USB fell asleep, so when I tried the loop there actually was no output

Well, that's for some stumbling on my way to knowledge... :)

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