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I am currently facing this scenario and i need your help :

Having two winForms Form1 and Form2, a click button's event on form1 will launch form2. I want to launch form2 and close (dispose) form1.

I have two ways to call form2 :

1) Using a blocking call with ShowDialog();

namespace programm
{
  public partial class Form1 : Form
  {
    public Form1()
      {
        InitializeComponent();
      }

    private void callForm2bt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
      Form2 form2 = new Form2();
      form2.ShowDialog();
      this.Close();  
    }
  }
}

In this case, once form2 is called i can't close (dispose) form1.

2) Using an unblocking call with Show() ;

namespace programm
{
  public partial class Form1 : Form
  {
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void callForm2bt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Form2 form2 = new Form2();
        form2.Show();
        this.Close();

    }
  }
}

In this case, once form1 is closed ( disposed) it dispose automatically form2.

Any idea how to dispose form1 and keeping form2 functional ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I don't really understand what you're trying to accomplish here. –  Cody Gray Jul 26 '11 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

Either do the inverse: run the Form2 as the main form, and set its visibility to false, and start Form1 from it, and when finished from Form1 close it and set the Form2 visibility to true. So:

static void Main()
{
    ...
    Application.Run(new Form2());//instead of Form1
}

public class Form2 ...
{
    //At From2.Load:
    private void Form2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.Hide();//the form2 will hide and show the form 1.
        Form1 form1 = new Form1(this);
        form1.Show();
    }
}

public class Form1...
{

    private Form2 _form2 = null;

    public Form1()
    { InitializeComponents();}

    public Form1(Form2 form2) : this()
    {
        _form2 = form2;
    }

    private void callForm2bt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (_form2 != null)
        {
            _form2.Show();
        }
        this.Close();
    }
}

Or use your current method but don't close the Form1, instead set its visability to false when you finished from it. by calling this.Hide(); or this.Visable = false; Like:

private void callForm2bt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Form2 form2 = new Form2();
    form2.Show();
    this.Hide();//this will hide the control from the user but it will still alive.
}

Edit: At the first solution you can also use form1.ShowDialog() and get rid from passing Form2 instance to Form1 constructor, So:

//At From2.Load:
private void Form2_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.Hide();//the form2 will hide and show the form 1.
    Form1 form1 = new Form1();
    form1.ShowDialog();
    this.Show();//the form1 is closed so just show this again.
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't address the requirement of disposing forms and proper order of initialization. May or may not be an issue, depending on the application. But if one or both of the forms uses a lot of memory or takes a lot of time to initialize & construct, this method could be a problem. –  James Johnston Jul 26 '11 at 15:36
    
In the second solution we are not disposing the Form1, however in the first solution the dispose is called. if it is not an issue to the poster the second solution is simpler. however since he is only using the Form1 at the start of the application and then swap to Form2, that means the main form here is Form2... but it is up to him to decide which one is more suitable to the solution. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 26 '11 at 15:40
    
@soumial: check my answer updates. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 26 '11 at 15:59
    
@soumial did you try this out? does it solves your issue? –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 30 '11 at 9:59

From MSDN for Application.Run(Form) method:
"This method adds an event handler to the mainForm parameter for the Closed event. The event handler calls ExitThread to clean up the application."
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms157902(VS.90).aspx

Basically, when your main form exits, all message pumps are stopped.

I don't know what the forms do in your real-world application but you'll have to work around this behavior. Some ideas - and the correct one probably depends on what you're doing:

  • If Form1 is some kind of dialog, you could call ShowDialog on it before Application.Run. For example:

    static void Main() {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
        Form1 fm = new Form1();
        fm.ShowDialog();
        Application.Run(new Form2());
    }
    

    When Form1 is closed then Form2 will be opened. The return value of ShowDialog could be used to determine whether to proceed and open Form2, or exit the application.

  • Another idea might be to call Application.Run twice. Form1 could set a flag indicating whether to open Form2.

Usually in my applications, Form1 is typically some kind of dialog (e.g. a registration form, etc.) and so the first behavior is usually what I do. If the dialog is cancelled then I don't run the application.

Edit: If Form1 may branch out to a number of other forms, you could have it return the form for opening to Main via a field. For example:

  • Add a public field "Form FormToOpen" to Form1. Set it to null when the form is constructed.
  • When the button on Form1 is pressed, give FormToOpen a value. For example: "FormToOpen = new Form2()".
  • Change the Application.Run line as follows:

    if (fm.FormToOpen != null) Application.Run(fm.FormToOpen);
    

At this point it would be trivial for Form1 to have more buttons that open other forms. The main function would not need special knowledge about each form, and the additional forms would not need special knowledge about Form1.

share|improve this answer

Consider injection of Form2 instance through constructor of Form1, it reduces a class coupling and increases a flexibility, in this way you can safely dispose form1 and keep form2 a live

share|improve this answer
2  
There is no @downvoter. And "heyyyy" doesn't mean anything. –  Cody Gray Jul 26 '11 at 15:37
    
By this I requesting any elaboration on downvote. Anyway agreed about "heyyy", I'll correct it as soon as can edit this particular comment –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 15:50
    
The original answer did not work. I tried it. –  James Johnston Jul 26 '11 at 16:03
    
@James Johnston: agreed, this is why I've edited initial answer and removed first suggestion about variable lifecycle scope. –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 16:13

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