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Here is the software version number:

"1.0", "1.0.1", "2.0", "2.0.0.1", "2.0.1"

How can I compare this?? Assume the correct order is:

"1.0", "1.0.1", "2.0", "2.0.0.1", "2.0.1"

The idea is simple...: Read the first digit, than, the second, after that the third.... But I can't convert the version number to float number.... You also can see the version number like this:

"1.0.0.0", "1.0.1.0", "2.0.0.0", "2.0.0.1", "2.0.1.0"

and this is more clear to see what is the idea behind... But, how to convert it into a computer program?? Do any one have any idea on how to sorting this? Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Interesting question. –  MrMisterMan Jul 26 '11 at 15:33
2  
This would be a good fizzbuzz-type interview question. –  Steve Claridge Jul 26 '11 at 15:33
    
Thank you. XD... –  Tattat Jul 26 '11 at 15:34
    
This why all software version numbers should be integers like 2001403. When you want to display it in some friendly way like "2.0.14.3" then you format the version number at presentation time. –  jarmod May 10 '13 at 21:50
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18 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The basic idea to make this comparison would be to use Array.split to get arrays of parts from the input strings and then compare pairs of parts from the two arrays; if the parts are not equal we know which version is smaller.

There are a few of important details to keep in mind:

  1. How should the parts in each pair be compared? The question wants to compare numerically, but what if we have version strings that are not made up of just digits (e.g. "1.0a")?
  2. What should happen if one version string has more parts than the other? Most likely "1.0" should be considered less than "1.0.1", but what about "1.0.0"?

Here's the code for an implementation that you can use directly (gist with documentation):

function versionCompare(v1, v2, options) {
    var lexicographical = options && options.lexicographical,
        zeroExtend = options && options.zeroExtend,
        v1parts = v1.split('.'),
        v2parts = v2.split('.');

    function isValidPart(x) {
        return (lexicographical ? /^\d+[A-Za-z]*$/ : /^\d+$/).test(x);
    }

    if (!v1parts.every(isValidPart) || !v2parts.every(isValidPart)) {
        return NaN;
    }

    if (zeroExtend) {
        while (v1parts.length < v2parts.length) v1parts.push("0");
        while (v2parts.length < v1parts.length) v2parts.push("0");
    }

    if (!lexicographical) {
        v1parts = v1parts.map(Number);
        v2parts = v2parts.map(Number);
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < v1parts.length; ++i) {
        if (v2parts.length == i) {
            return 1;
        }

        if (v1parts[i] == v2parts[i]) {
            continue;
        }
        else if (v1parts[i] > v2parts[i]) {
            return 1;
        }
        else {
            return -1;
        }
    }

    if (v1parts.length != v2parts.length) {
        return -1;
    }

    return 0;
}

This version compares parts naturally, does not accept character suffixes and considers "1.7" to be smaller than "1.7.0". The comparison mode can be changed to lexicographical and shorter version strings can be automatically zero-padded using the optional third argument.

There is a JSFiddle that runs "unit tests" here; it is a slightly expanded version of ripper234's work (thank you).

Important note: This code uses Array.map and Array.every, which means that it will not run in IE versions earlier than 9. If you need to support those you will have to provide polyfills for the missing methods.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking, when will this case valid: if (v2parts.length == i) { return v1 + " is smaller"; } –  Tattat Jul 26 '11 at 22:10
    
@Tattat: Actually it should read "is larger". Fixed now, thanks. –  Jon Jul 26 '11 at 22:26
6  
Here is an improved version with some unit tests: jsfiddle.net/ripper234/Xv9WL/28 –  ripper234 Mar 13 '12 at 10:36
1  
Your algorithm isnt't working correctly if we compare '11.1.2' with '3.1.2' for example. You should convert the strings to integer before comparing them. Please fix this ;) –  Tamás Pap Sep 8 '12 at 8:01
1  
@stafffan: Answer updated. There is now a flag that zero-pads the shorter version string as necessary, making 1.7 equal to 1.7.0.0.0.0.0. –  Jon Dec 18 '13 at 12:39
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// Return 1 if a > b
// Return -1 if a < b
// Return 0 if a == b
function compare(a, b) {
    if (a === b) {
       return 0;
    }

    var a_components = a.split(".");
    var b_components = b.split(".");

    var len = Math.min(a_components.length, b_components.length);

    // loop while the components are equal
    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        // A bigger than B
        if (parseInt(a_components[i]) > parseInt(b_components[i])) {
            return 1;
        }

        // B bigger than A
        if (parseInt(a_components[i]) < parseInt(b_components[i])) {
            return -1;
        }
    }

    // If one's a prefix of the other, the longer one is greater.
    if (a_components.length > b_components.length) {
        return 1;
    }

    if (a_components.length < b_components.length) {
        return -1;
    }

    // Otherwise they are the same.
    return 0;
}

console.log(compare("1", "2"));
console.log(compare("2", "1"));

console.log(compare("1.0", "1.0"));
console.log(compare("2.0", "1.0"));
console.log(compare("1.0", "2.0"));
console.log(compare("1.0.1", "1.0"));
share|improve this answer
    
I think the line: var len = Math.min(a_components.length, b_components.length); will cause versions 2.0.1.1 and 2.0.1 to be treated as equal will it? –  Jon Egerton Jul 26 '11 at 15:47
    
No. Look just after the loop! If one string is a prefix of the other (i.e. loop reaches the end), then the longer one is taken as higher. –  Joe Jul 26 '11 at 15:51
    
Oh yes: My Bad ;) –  Jon Egerton Jul 26 '11 at 16:04
    
Perhaps you were put off my stumbling over the English language in the comment... –  Joe Jul 26 '11 at 16:11
    
@Joe I know is a bit old answer but I was using the function. Testing a = '7' and b = '7.0' returns -1 because 7.0 is longer. Got any suggestion for that? ( console.log(compare("7", "7.0")); //returns -1 ) –  RaphaelDDL Sep 17 '13 at 21:24
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Taken from http://java.com/js/deployJava.js:

    // return true if 'installed' (considered as a JRE version string) is
    // greater than or equal to 'required' (again, a JRE version string).
    compareVersions: function (installed, required) {

        var a = installed.split('.');
        var b = required.split('.');

        for (var i = 0; i < a.length; ++i) {
            a[i] = Number(a[i]);
        }
        for (var i = 0; i < b.length; ++i) {
            b[i] = Number(b[i]);
        }
        if (a.length == 2) {
            a[2] = 0;
        }

        if (a[0] > b[0]) return true;
        if (a[0] < b[0]) return false;

        if (a[1] > b[1]) return true;
        if (a[1] < b[1]) return false;

        if (a[2] > b[2]) return true;
        if (a[2] < b[2]) return false;

        return true;
    }
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Couldn't find a function doing what I wanted here. So I wrote my own. This is my contribution. I hope someone find it useful.

Pros:

  • Handles version strings of arbitrary length. '1' or '1.1.1.1.1'.

  • Defaults each value to 0 if not specified. Just because a string is longer doesn't mean it's a bigger version. ('1' should be the same as '1.0' and '1.0.0.0'.)

  • Compare numbers not strings. ('3'<'21' should be true. Not false.)

  • Don't waste time on useless compares in the loop. (Comparing for ==)

  • You can choose your own comparator.

Cons:

  • It does not handle letters in the version string. (I don't know how that would even work?)

My code, similar to the accepted answer by Jon:

function compareVersions(v1, comparator, v2) {
    "use strict";
    comparator = comparator == '=' ? '==' : comparator;
    var v1parts = v1.split('.'), v2parts = v2.split('.');
    var maxLen = Math.max(v1parts.length, v2parts.length);
    var part1, part2;
    var cmp = 0;
    for(var i = 0; i < maxLen && !cmp; i++) {
        part1 = parseInt(v1parts[i], 10) || 0;
        part2 = parseInt(v2parts[i], 10) || 0;
        if(part1 < part2)
            cmp = 1;
        if(part1 > part2)
            cmp = -1;
    }
    return eval('0' + comparator + cmp);
}

Examples:

compareVersions('1.2.0', '==', '1.2'); // true
compareVersions('00001', '==', '1.0.0'); // true
compareVersions('1.2.0', '<=', '1.2'); // true
compareVersions('2.2.0', '<=', '1.2'); // false
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The replace() function only replaces the first occurence in the string. So, lets replace the . with ,. Afterwards delete all . and make the , to . again and parse it to float.

for(i=0; i<versions.length; i++) {
    v = versions[i].replace('.', ',');
    v = v.replace(/\./g, '');
    versions[i] = parseFloat(v.replace(',', '.'));
}

finally, sort it:

versions.sort();
share|improve this answer
    
This only works for single digit version numbers. –  Tim Jun 20 at 16:48
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Here is my solution to this Problem. A very small, yet very fast compare function for version numbers. It takes version numbers of any length and any number size per segment.

It will return a number less than 0 if a < b, a number greater than zero if b > a, and zero if a = b. So you can also use it as compare function for Array.sort();

function cmpVersions (a, b) {
    var i, l, d;

    a = a.split('.');
    b = b.split('.');
    l = Math.min(a.length, b.length);

    for (i=0; i<l; i++) {
        d = parseInt(a[i], 10) - parseInt(b[i], 10);
        if (d !== 0) {
            return d;
        }
    }

    return a.length - b.length;
}
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Check the function version_compare() from the php.js project. It's is similar to PHP's version_compare().

You can simply use it like this:

version_compare('2.0', '2.0.0.1', '<'); 
// returns true
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Check out this blog post. This function works for numeric version numbers.

function compVersions(strV1, strV2) {
  var nRes = 0
    , parts1 = strV1.split('.')
    , parts2 = strV2.split('.')
    , nLen = Math.max(parts1.length, parts2.length);

  for (var i = 0; i < nLen; i++) {
    var nP1 = (i < parts1.length) ? parseInt(parts1[i], 10) : 0
      , nP2 = (i < parts2.length) ? parseInt(parts2[i], 10) : 0;

    if (isNaN(nP1)) { nP1 = 0; }
    if (isNaN(nP2)) { nP2 = 0; }

    if (nP1 != nP2) {
      nRes = (nP1 > nP2) ? 1 : -1;
      break;
    }
  }

  return nRes;
};

compVersions('10', '10.0'); // 0
compVersions('10.1', '10.01.0'); // 0
compVersions('10.0.1', '10.0'); // 1
compVersions('10.0.1', '10.1'); // -1
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If, for example, we want to check if the current jQuery version is less than 1.8, parseFloat($.ui.version) < 1.8 ) would give a wrong result if version is "1.10.1", since parseFloat("1.10.1") returns 1.1. A string compare would also go wrong, since "1.8" < "1.10" evaluates to false.

So we need a test like this

if(versionCompare($.ui.version, "1.8") < 0){
    alert("please update jQuery");
}

The following function handles this correctly:

/** Compare two dotted version strings (like '10.2.3').
 * @returns {Integer} 0: v1 == v2, -1: v1 < v2, 1: v1 > v2
 */
function versionCompare(v1, v2) {
    var v1parts = ("" + v1).split("."),
        v2parts = ("" + v2).split("."),
        minLength = Math.min(v1parts.length, v2parts.length),
        p1, p2, i;
    // Compare tuple pair-by-pair. 
    for(i = 0; i < minLength; i++) {
        // Convert to integer if possible, because "8" > "10".
        p1 = parseInt(v1parts[i], 10);
        p2 = parseInt(v2parts[i], 10);
        if (isNaN(p1)){ p1 = v1parts[i]; } 
        if (isNaN(p2)){ p2 = v2parts[i]; } 
        if (p1 == p2) {
            continue;
        }else if (p1 > p2) {
            return 1;
        }else if (p1 < p2) {
            return -1;
        }
        // one operand is NaN
        return NaN;
    }
    // The longer tuple is always considered 'greater'
    if (v1parts.length === v2parts.length) {
        return 0;
    }
    return (v1parts.length < v2parts.length) ? -1 : 1;
}

Here are some examples:

// compare dotted version strings
console.assert(versionCompare("1.8",      "1.8.1")    <   0);
console.assert(versionCompare("1.8.3",    "1.8.1")    >   0);
console.assert(versionCompare("1.8",      "1.10")     <   0);
console.assert(versionCompare("1.10.1",   "1.10.1")   === 0);
// Longer is considered 'greater'
console.assert(versionCompare("1.10.1.0", "1.10.1")   >   0);
console.assert(versionCompare("1.10.1",   "1.10.1.0") <   0);
// Strings pairs are accepted
console.assert(versionCompare("1.x",      "1.x")      === 0);
// Mixed int/string pairs return NaN
console.assert(isNaN(versionCompare("1.8", "1.x")));
//works with plain numbers
console.assert(versionCompare("4", 3)   >   0);

See here for a live sample and test suite: http://jsfiddle.net/mar10/8KjvP/

share|improve this answer
    
arghh, just noticed that ripper234 had posted a fiddle URL in on eof the comments a few months ago that is quite similar. Anyway, I keep my answer here... –  mar10 Jan 26 '13 at 18:49
    
This one will also fail (as most of variants around) in these cases: versionCompare('1.09', '1.1') returns "1", the same way as versionCompare('1.702', '1.8'). –  shaman.sir Sep 5 '13 at 0:33
    
The code evaluates "1.09" > "1.1" and "1.702" > "1.8", which I think is correct. If you don't agree: can you point to some resource that backs your opinion? –  mar10 Sep 7 '13 at 9:35
    
It depends on your principles — as I know there's no strict rule or something. Regarding resources, wikipedia article for "Software versioning" in "Incrementing sequences" says that 1.81 may be a minor version of 1.8, so 1.8 should read as 1.80. Semantic versioning article semver.org/spec/v2.0.0.html also says that 1.9.0 -> 1.10.0 -> 1.11.0, so 1.9.0 is treated as 1.90.0 in comparison like this. So, following this logic, version 1.702 was before version 1.8, which is treated as 1.800. –  shaman.sir Sep 30 '13 at 16:26
1  
I see that some rules treat 1.8 < 1.81 < 1.9. But in semver you would use 1.8.1 instead of 1.81. Semver (as I understand it) is defined around the assumption that incrementing a part will always generate a 'later' version, so 1.8 < 1.8.1 < 1.9 < 1.10 < 1.81 < 1.90 < 1.100 . I don't see an indication that this is limted to two digits either. So I would say that my code is fully compliant with semver. –  mar10 Oct 1 '13 at 7:14
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You can loop through every period-delimited character and convert it to an int:

var parts = versionString.split('.');

for (var i = 0; i < parts.length; i++) {
  var value = parseInt(parts[i]);
  // do stuffs here.. perhaps build a numeric version variable?
}
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Here could be another solution (simple but effective):

versions.sort(function(a, b) {
    a = a.split('.');
    b = b.split('.');
    while (true) {
        if (!a.length || !b.length) {
            return a.length - b.length;
        } else if (a[0] != b[0]) {
            return a[0] - b[0];
        }
        a.shift();
        b.shift();
    }
});

Demo

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Here's a fun way to do it OO:

    function versionString(str) {
    var parts = str.split('.');
    this.product = parts.length > 0 ? parts[0] * 1 : 0;
    this.major = parts.length > 1 ? parts[1] * 1 : 0;
    this.minor = parts.length > 2 ? parts[2] * 1 : 0;
    this.build = parts.length > 3 ? parts[3] * 1 : 0;

    this.compareTo = function(vStr){
        vStr = this._isVersionString(vStr) ? vStr : new versionString(vStr);
        return this.compare(this, vStr);
    };

    this.toString = function(){
        return this.product + "." + this.major + "." + this.minor + "." + this.build;
    }

    this.compare = function (str1, str2) {
        var vs1 = this._isVersionString(str1) ? str1 : new versionString(str1);
        var vs2 = this._isVersionString(str2) ? str2 : new versionString(str2);

        if (this._compareNumbers(vs1.product, vs2.product) == 0) {
            if (this._compareNumbers(vs1.major, vs2.major) == 0) {
                if (this._compareNumbers(vs1.minor, vs2.minor) == 0) {
                    return this._compareNumbers(vs1.build, vs2.build);
                } else {
                    return this._compareNumbers(vs1.minor, vs2.minor);
                }
            } else {
                return this._compareNumbers(vs1.major, vs2.major);
            }
        } else {
            return this._compareNumbers(vs1.product, vs2.product);
        }
    };

    this._isVersionString = function (str) {
        return str !== undefined && str.build !== undefined;
    };

    this._compareNumbers = function (n1, n2) {
        if (n1 > n2) {
            return 1;
        } else if (n1 < n2) {
            return -1;
        } else {
            return 0;
        }
    };
}

And some tests:

var v1 = new versionString("1.0");
var v2 = new versionString("1.0.1");
var v3 = new versionString("2.0");
var v4 = new versionString("2.0.0.1");
var v5 = new versionString("2.0.1");


alert(v1.compareTo("1.4.2"));
alert(v3.compareTo(v1));
alert(v5.compareTo(v4));
alert(v4.compareTo(v5));
alert(v5.compareTo(v5));
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It really depends on the logic behind your versioning system. What does each number represent, and how it is used.

Is each subversion is a numeration for designating development stage? 0 for alpha 1 for beta 2 for release candidate 3 for (final) release

Is it a build version? Are you applying incremental updates?

Once you know how the versioning system works, creating the algorithm becomes easy.

If you don't allow numbers greater than 9 in each subversion, eliminating all the decimals but the first will allow you to do a straight comparison.

If you do allow numbers greater than 9 in any of subversions, there are several ways to compare them. The most obvious is to split the string by the decimals and compare each column.

But without knowing how the versioning system works, implementing a process like the ones above can get harry when version 1.0.2a is released.

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couldnt you convert them into numbers and then sort after size? Append 0's to the ones to the numbers that are < 4 in length

played around in console:

$(["1.0.0.0", "1.0.1.0", "2.0.0.0", "2.0.0.1", "2.0.1", "3.0"]).each(function(i,e) {
    var n =   e.replace(/\./g,"");
    while(n.length < 4) n+="0" ; 
    num.push(  +n  )
});

bigger the version, the bigger number. Edit: probably needs adjusting to account for bigger version series

share|improve this answer
    
Where did you get 4? –  Joe Jul 26 '11 at 15:56
    
biggest version had 4 digits –  Contra Jul 26 '11 at 15:58
    
That seems like the kind of maintenance problem that could come back to bite... –  Joe Jul 26 '11 at 16:13
    
That was just an example, as he's got to do some things himself :P Instead of 4, get the amount of numbers the biggest version has, then fill the ones lower than that with 0's –  Contra Jul 26 '11 at 16:16
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This is a neat trick. If you are dealing with numeric values, between a specific range of values, you can assign a value to each level of the version object. For instance "largestValue" is set to 0xFF here, which creates a very "IP" sort of look to your versioning.

This also handles alpha-numeric versioning (i.e. 1.2a < 1.2b)

// The version compare function
function compareVersion(data0, data1, levels) {
    function getVersionHash(version) {
        var value = 0;
        version = version.split(".").map(function (a) {
            var n = parseInt(a);
            var letter = a.replace(n, "");
            if (letter) {
                return n + letter[0].charCodeAt() / 0xFF;
            } else {
                return n;
            }
        });
        for (var i = 0; i < version.length; ++i) {
            if (levels === i) break;
            value += version[i] / 0xFF * Math.pow(0xFF, levels - i + 1);
        }
        return value;
    };
    var v1 = getVersionHash(data0);
    var v2 = getVersionHash(data1);
    return v1 === v2 ? -1 : v1 > v2 ? 0 : 1;
};
// Returns 0 or 1, correlating to input A and input B
// Direct match returns -1
var version = compareVersion("1.254.253", "1.254.253a", 3);
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I like the version from @mar10, though from my point of view, there is a chance of misusage (seems it is not the case if versions are compatible with Semantic Versioning document, but may be the case if some "build number" is used):

versionCompare( '1.09', '1.1');  // returns 1, which is wrong:  1.09 < 1.1
versionCompare('1.702', '1.8');  // returns 1, which is wrong: 1.702 < 1.8

The problem here is that sub-numbers of version number are, in some cases, written with trailing zeroes cut out (at least as I recently see it while using different software), which is similar to rational part of a number, so:

5.17.2054 > 5.17.2
5.17.2 == 5.17.20 == 5.17.200 == ... 
5.17.2054 > 5.17.20
5.17.2054 > 5.17.200
5.17.2054 > 5.17.2000
5.17.2054 > 5.17.20000
5.17.2054 < 5.17.20001
5.17.2054 < 5.17.3
5.17.2054 < 5.17.30

The first (or both first and second) version sub-number, however, is always treated as an integer value it actually equals to.

If you use this kind of versioning, you may change just a few lines in the example:

// replace this:
p1 = parseInt(v1parts[i], 10);
p2 = parseInt(v2parts[i], 10);
// with this:
p1 = i/* > 0 */ ? parseFloat('0.' + v1parts[i], 10) : parseInt(v1parts[i], 10);
p2 = i/* > 0 */ ? parseFloat('0.' + v2parts[i], 10) : parseInt(v2parts[i], 10);

So every sub-number except the first one will be compared as a float, so 09 and 1 will become 0.09 and 0.1 accordingly and compared properly this way. 2054 and 3 will become 0.2054 and 0.3.

The complete version then, is (credits to @mar10):

/** Compare two dotted version strings (like '10.2.3').
 * @returns {Integer} 0: v1 == v2, -1: v1 < v2, 1: v1 > v2
 */
function versionCompare(v1, v2) {
    var v1parts = ("" + v1).split("."),
        v2parts = ("" + v2).split("."),
        minLength = Math.min(v1parts.length, v2parts.length),
        p1, p2, i;
    // Compare tuple pair-by-pair. 
    for(i = 0; i < minLength; i++) {
        // Convert to integer if possible, because "8" > "10".
        p1 = i/* > 0 */ ? parseFloat('0.' + v1parts[i], 10) : parseInt(v1parts[i], 10);;
        p2 = i/* > 0 */ ? parseFloat('0.' + v2parts[i], 10) : parseInt(v2parts[i], 10);
        if (isNaN(p1)){ p1 = v1parts[i]; } 
        if (isNaN(p2)){ p2 = v2parts[i]; } 
        if (p1 == p2) {
            continue;
        }else if (p1 > p2) {
            return 1;
        }else if (p1 < p2) {
            return -1;
        }
        // one operand is NaN
        return NaN;
    }
    // The longer tuple is always considered 'greater'
    if (v1parts.length === v2parts.length) {
        return 0;
    }
    return (v1parts.length < v2parts.length) ? -1 : 1;
}

P.S. It is slower, but also possible to think on re-using the same comparing function operating the fact that the string is actually the array of characters:

 function cmp_ver(arr1, arr2) {
     // fill the tail of the array with smaller length with zeroes, to make both array have the same length
     while (min_arr.length < max_arr.length) {
         min_arr[min_arr.lentgh] = '0';
     }
     // compare every element in arr1 with corresponding element from arr2, 
     // but pass them into the same function, so string '2054' will act as
     // ['2','0','5','4'] and string '19', in this case, will become ['1', '9', '0', '0']
     for (i: 0 -> max_length) {
         var res = cmp_ver(arr1[i], arr2[i]);
         if (res !== 0) return res;
     }
 }
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I made this based on Kons idea, and optimized it for Java version "1.7.0_45". It's just a function meant to convert a version string to a float. This is the function:

function parseVersionFloat(versionString) {
    var versionArray = ("" + versionString)
            .replace("_", ".")
            .replace(/[^0-9.]/g, "")
            .split("."),
        sum = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < versionArray.length; ++i) {
        sum += Number(versionArray[i]) / Math.pow(10, i * 3);
    }
    console.log(versionString + " -> " + sum);
    return sum;
}

String "1.7.0_45" is converted to 1.0070000450000001 and this is good enough for a normal comparison. Error explained here: Elegant workaround for JavaScript floating point number problem. If need more then 3 digits on any part you can change the divider Math.pow(10, i * 3);.

Output will look like this:

1.7.0_45         > 1.007000045
ver 1.7.build_45 > 1.007000045
1.234.567.890    > 1.23456789
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Here's a coffeescript implementation suitable for use with Array.sort inspired by other answers here:

# Returns > 0 if v1 > v2 and < 0 if v1 < v2 and 0 if v1 == v2
compareVersions = (v1, v2) ->
  v1Parts = v1.split('.')
  v2Parts = v2.split('.')
  minLength = Math.min(v1Parts.length, v2Parts.length)
  if minLength > 0
    for idx in [0..minLength - 1]
      diff = Number(v1Parts[idx]) - Number(v2Parts[idx])
      return diff unless diff is 0
  return v1Parts.length - v2Parts.length
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