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F# has a convenient feature "with", example:

type Product = { Name:string; Price:int };;
let p = { Name="Test"; Price=42; };;
let p2 = { p with Name="Test2" };;

F# created keyword "with" as the record types are by default immutable.

Now, is it possible to define a similar extension in C#? seems it's a bit tricky, as in C# i'm not sure how to convert a string

Name="Test2"

to a delegate or expression?

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I expect to see more of these questions as functional languages become mainstream. A common refrain will be "How can I do [some functional feature] in [my favorite language]?" –  Daniel Jul 26 '11 at 17:23
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
public static T With<T, U>(this T obj, Expression<Func<T, U>> property, U value)
    where T : ICloneable {
    if (obj == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
    if (property == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("property");
    var memExpr = property.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (memExpr == null || !(memExpr.Member is PropertyInfo))
        throw new ArgumentException("Must refer to a property", "property");
    var copy = (T)obj.Clone();
    var propInfo = (PropertyInfo)memExpr.Member;
    propInfo.SetValue(copy, value, null);
    return copy;
}

public class Foo : ICloneable {
    public int Id { get; set; } 
    public string Bar { get; set; }
    object ICloneable.Clone() {
        return new Foo { Id = this.Id, Bar = this.Bar };
    }
}

public static void Test() {
    var foo = new Foo { Id = 1, Bar = "blah" };
    var newFoo = foo.With(x => x.Bar, "boo-ya");
    Console.WriteLine(newFoo.Bar); //boo-ya
}

Or, using a copy constructor:

public class Foo {
    public Foo(Foo other) {
        this.Id = other.Id;
        this.Bar = other.Bar;
    }
    public Foo() { }
    public int Id { get; set; } 
    public string Bar { get; set; }
}

public static void Test() {
    var foo = new Foo { Id = 1, Bar = "blah" };
    var newFoo = new Foo(foo) { Bar = "boo-ya" };
    Console.WriteLine(newFoo.Bar);
}

And a slight variation on George's excellent suggestion, that allows for multiple assignments:

public static T With<T>(this T obj, params Action<T>[] assignments)
    where T : ICloneable {
    if (obj == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("obj");
    if (assignments == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("assignments");
    var copy = (T)obj.Clone();
    foreach (var a in assignments) {
        a(copy);
    }
    return copy;
}

public static void Test() {
    var foo = new Foo { Id = 1, Bar = "blah" };
    var newFoo = foo.With(x => x.Id = 2, x => x.Bar = "boo-ya");
    Console.WriteLine(newFoo.Bar);
}

I would probably use the second one since (1) any general purpose solution is going to be unnecessarily slow and convoluted; (2) it has the closest syntax to what you want (and the syntax does what you expect); (3) F# copy-and-update expressions are implemented similarly.

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is it possible to do: var newFoo = foo.With( Bar = "boo-ya"); ? –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 16:05
    
@athos: Yes, I added another (better, although not general-purpose) method. –  Daniel Jul 26 '11 at 16:10
    
@athos: I wish there was a copy constructor constraint (maybe where T : new(T)) so we could ruminate on generalized solutions to this. Perhaps as immutability gains better support in C# we will see features that make this easier. –  Daniel Jul 26 '11 at 16:13
2  
@athos: ...in the meantime, I recommend F#. :-) –  Daniel Jul 26 '11 at 16:33
    
Thanks. solution (1) using MemberExpression is smart, yeah (2) is fine but yeah C# missing a copy constructor constraint; (3) supports multiple assignments is also nice to know! –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 17:27
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Maybe something like this:

void Main()
{
    var NewProduct = ExistingProduct.With(P => P.Name = "Test2");
}

// Define other methods and classes here

public static class Extensions
{
    public T With<T>(this T Instance, Action<T> Act) where T : ICloneable
    {
        var Result = Instance.Clone();
        Act(Result);

        return Result;
    }
}
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is it possible to do something like: var NewProduct = ExistingProduct.With(Name = "Test2"); ? –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 16:02
    
It's unlikely, you could, using String.Split and Reflection, do something like: var NewProduct = ExistingProduct.With("Name='Test2'"); But you then get no compile time checking and you take a significant performance hit so I wouldn't recommend it. A lambda expression is about as nice as you're likely to get. –  ForbesLindesay Jul 26 '11 at 16:46
    
very readable. +1 –  vlad Jul 26 '11 at 17:00
    
agree, parsing strings and doing reflection is an overkill. –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 17:20
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As an alternative to lambda function, you can use parameters with default values. The only minor issue is that you have to pick some default value that means do not change this parameter (for reference types), but null should be a safe choice:

class Product {
   public string Name { get; private set; }
   public int Price { get; private set; }
   public Product(string name, int price) {
     Name = name; Price = price;
   }

   // Creates a new product using the current values and changing
   // the values of the specified arguments to a new value
   public Product With(string name = null, int? price = null) {
     return new Product(name ?? Name, price ?? Price);
   }
 }

 // Then you can write:
 var prod2 = prod1.With(name = "New product");

You have to define the method yourself, but that's always the case (unless you're going to use reflection, which less efficient). I think the syntax is reasonably nice too. If you want to make it as nice as in F#, then you'll have to use F# :-)

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1  
I agree, just use F#! –  Daniel Jul 26 '11 at 16:32
    
haha Tomas, you know what, I'm reading your "F# language review" right now! nice to see you here :) –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 17:04
    
Although this "With" depends on the Product Type, using parameters with default values is a smart tricky and interesting! :) –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 17:19
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There is no native ability to do this in C# short of an extension method, but at what cost? a and b are reference types and any suggestion that b is based ("with") on a causes immediate confusion as to how many objects we are working with. Is there only one? Is b a copy of a ? Does b point to a ?

C# is not F#.

Please see a previous SO question of mine as answered by Eric Lippert:

"Amongst my rules of thumb for writing clear code is: put all side effects in statements; non-statement expressions should have no side effects."

More fluent C# / .NET

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hi Andleer, Eric's points are always worthy of a 2nd thought. just.. if we check the current TDD frameworks such as NUnit, there are lines similar to your question and mine... in a way i think "write code as close as natural English" has some merits there... if you think otherwise, well, we still can take this question as some quiz for fun ! :p –  athos Jul 26 '11 at 17:03
    
Athos, on a personal level I don't feel strongly about this. On a professional level, I liked Eric's answer because it allowed me to make a strong argument with my co-workers. No need to continue going around on this. Good luck! –  andleer Jul 26 '11 at 18:03
    
@andleer - I think it is a fair question to ask how to get some construct similar to F#'s with in C#. Using this only makes sense if you're working with immutable types, but that is perfectly useful approach in C# (afterall, all value types should be immutable). If the type is immutable then all your concerns are not a problem at all. Of course, when using mutable type, things become more difficult, but that's not what I think about when I see "F# record" in the question :-). –  Tomas Petricek Jul 26 '11 at 18:30
    
(That's why I think that George Duckett's answer isn't quite right because it is assuming that the type is mutable.) –  Tomas Petricek Jul 26 '11 at 18:32
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