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I am trying to analyze some javascript, and one line is

var x = unescape("%u4141%u4141 ......"); 

with lots of characters in form "%uxxxx".

I want to rewrite the javascript in c# but can't figure out the proper function to decode a string of characters like this. I've tried

HttpUtility.HTMLDecode("%u4141%u4141");

but this did not change these characters at all. How can I accomplish this in c#?

Thanks!

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You are mixing up two different escaping/unescaping methods: one is for entities inside a HTML file, the other is for URLs, i.e. addresses. –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 30 '12 at 14:55

6 Answers 6

You can use UrlDecode:

string decoded = HttpUtility.UrlDecode("%u4141%u4141");

decoded would then contain "䅁䅁".

As other have pointed out, changing the % to \ would work, but UrlDecode is the preferred method, since that ensures that other escaped symbols are translated correctly as well.

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You need HttpUtility.UrlDecode. You shouldn't really be using escape/unescape in most cases nowadays, you should be using things like encodeURI/decodeURI/encodeURIComponent.

Best practice: escape, or encodeURI / encodeURIComponent

This question covers the issue of why escape/unescape are a bad idea.

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You can call bellow method to achieve the same effect as Javascript escape/unescape method

Microsoft.JScript.GlobalObject.unescape();

Microsoft.JScript.GlobalObject.escape();
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Change the % signs to backslashes and you have a C# string literal. C# treats \uxxxx as an escape sequence, with xxxx being 4 digits.

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Note: this only applies if the string is a hardcoded literal in the ops source code. Maybe he wants to decode some strings that are input into the program. Then HttpUtility.UrlDecode is the way to go... –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 30 '12 at 15:02

In basic string usage you can initiate string variable in Unicode: var someLine="\u4141"; If it is possible - replace all "%u" with "\u".

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1  
Note: this only applies if the string is a hardcoded literal in the ops source code. Maybe he wants to decode some strings that are input into the program. Then HttpUtility.UrlDecode is the way to go... –  Philip Daubmeier Jun 30 '12 at 15:03

edit the web.config the following parameter:

< globalization requestEncoding="iso-8859-15" responseEncoding="utf-8" >responseHeaderEncoding="utf-8" in < system.web >

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