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A few months ago i asked the question below.

My question.

However, i have ran into a problem.

When i use this query:

SELECT MAC, NAME FROM DB.HOST WHERE NAME REGEXP (SELECT CONCAT(LEFT(NAME, LENGTH(NAME)-1), "[0-9]+") FROM DB.HOST WHERE MAC="some mac");

If the mac address is resolved to "example_224-06-55" and their is another element in the DB named "example_224-06-55-00" they will both show up as a result of this query. I only want "example_224-06-55" to show up as a result of that query.

The size of the name's will vary, the examples are just examples.

I am having a really hard time figuring this out, any help is greatly appreciated!

THE WORKING QUERY:

SELECT MAC, NAME FROM DB.HOST WHERE NAME REGEXP (SELECT CONCAT(LEFT(NAME, LENGTH(NAME)-1), "[0-9][[:>:]]") FROM DB.HOST WHERE MAC="some mac");
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MySQL supports a special word boundary pattern [[:>:]] to solve this.

SELECT MAC, NAME FROM DB.HOST 
WHERE NAME REGEXP (
 SELECT CONCAT(LEFT(NAME, LENGTH(NAME)-1), '[0-9]+[[:>:]]') 
 FROM DB.HOST 
 WHERE MAC='some mac'
);

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/regexp.html, the word boundary patterns are documented near the bottom of the page.

ps: Use single-quotes for string literals in SQL. Double-quotes are for delimited identifiers.

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Thank you very much sir, that worked great! However, for it to work, i did have to remove the "+". –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:55
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Update your regular expression that exactly you want.

SELECT MAC, NAME FROM DB.HOST 
 WHERE NAME REGEXP 
  (SELECT CONCAT(LEFT(NAME, LENGTH(NAME)-1), "_[0-9]+-[0-9]+-[0-9]+$") 
    FROM DB.HOST WHERE MAC="some mac");
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It can be of a varrying length, that was just an example. –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:52
    
+1 for the assistance! –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:55
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If you want to write a pattern for strings ending with numbers like 'xxx-xx-xx' instead of "[0-9]+" you can use "\d\d\d-\d\d-\d\d"

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The size can be different every time. It might not always be only 7 digits, it might be 9 next time, or 5. –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:46
    
Then please clarify why the string "example_224-06-55-00" does not satisfy your requirements. Is it about the trailing zeroes ? –  Grigor Gevorgyan Jul 26 '11 at 17:47
    
Because if the "some mac" is resolved to a name "example_224-06-55" and their exists another name in the DB "example_224-06-55-00" they will both show up. I only want "example_224-06-55" to show up. –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:50
    
+1 for the assistance! –  prolink007 Jul 26 '11 at 17:55
    
Thanks, just didn't get what the exact problem was at once :) –  Grigor Gevorgyan Jul 26 '11 at 17:56
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