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I thought that the ternary operator returns either a value on the left side or the right side of : depending on the condition. Why does this following piece of code print 1?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) {
  int c = 0;
  (c?c:0)++;
  printf("%i", c);
  return 0;
}
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3  
What do you expect to happen when this 0++; is executed? I can't even imagine that this compiles. –  Nobody Jul 26 '11 at 18:58
1  
GCC 4.2.1 If that helps –  shreyasva Jul 26 '11 at 19:00
    
Logic is flawed anyway, you are not printing the value of ternary operator here –  unkulunkulu Jul 26 '11 at 19:01
    
But (c?0:c)++ didn't compile, crazy –  Fox32 Jul 26 '11 at 19:04
1  
With GCC 4.5.0: In function ‘main’: 5:2: error: lvalue required as increment operand What is returned when you compile this code with gcc -S code.cpp? –  Nobody Jul 26 '11 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You would appear to have a compiler bug, or perhaps a language extension, since this is not valid C. You need an lvalue in order to apply the ++ operator, and (c?c:0) is not an lvalue.

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1  
+1 ideone's compiler is buggy too :) –  pmg Jul 26 '11 at 19:00
1  
why did it increase c if it was 0 before that line??? Undefined behavior imminent? –  unkulunkulu Jul 26 '11 at 19:05
1  
@unkulunkulu Since it is not valid C then arguing about why it outputs 1 rather than 0 or indeed anything else is somewhat moot. –  David Heffernan Jul 26 '11 at 19:06
1  
@unkulunkulu : the C99 standard does say explicitly : "If an attempt is made to modify the result of a conditional operator or to access it after the next sequence point, the behavior is undefined." –  Sander De Dycker Jul 26 '11 at 19:26
1  
@Sander: No, it's not redundant. I think it actually is possible to do this without violating a constraint, like this or something similar: struct mystruct { int x; int a[2]; } r, s; (1 ? r : s).a[1] = 42;. Reference: Christian Bau, http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c/msg/f0d8751e95c4c677 –  Keith Thompson Jul 28 '11 at 2:18

I've just run across some oddness related to this, too. It seems that the result of a ternary conditional can be treated as an lvalue in gcc 3.3.2, but not in gcc 4.6 (I haven't got more versions ready to hand to narrow it down further). In fact it's not possible to compile gcc 3.3.2 using gcc 4.6 precisely because gcc 4.6 is much pickier about what constitutes an lvalue.

Another example from the gcc 3.3.2 source that doesn't compile with gcc 4.6:

char *x = ...;
*((void**)x)++ = ...;

gcc 4.6 could treat the result of a cast as an lvalue and increment it, but gcc 4.6 will not.

I also don't have the relevant standards to hand to find out of this is something that changed in the official standard or just something that gcc allowed at some stage.

Note also that C++ allows the ternary operator to return an lvalue, though you still can't increment 0. So this is valid C++ but not valid C:

int c = 0, d = 0;
(c?c:d)++;
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Simply because you are doing

(c?c:0)++;

If you don't let "++" happen, you will get what you want.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) {
  int c = 0;
  /*  (c?c:0)++;  */
  printf("%i \n", (c?c:0)++ );
  return 0;
}

output is:

$ gcc -o ternary ternary.c 
$ ./ternary 
0 

gcc version 4.4.3 (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5)

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That's not valid C either, you really mean (c?c:0)+1 I presume –  David Heffernan Jul 26 '11 at 19:06
    
Why is my compiler killing me (by not throwing error :p) :( –  hari Jul 26 '11 at 19:09
    
The way I understand is: (c?c:0)++; -- it will check if c exists. It does in this case (and in all cases here); it will do: (value of c)++. That gives 1. What is wrong in this? –  hari Jul 26 '11 at 19:13
    
The result of a ternary operator is not an lvalue –  David Heffernan Jul 26 '11 at 19:16
1  
@hari: ++ operates on a modifiable lvalue, else what would you expect it to update? –  ninjalj Jul 26 '11 at 19:22

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