Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get the first day of the week of any given year (day being 1 to 7, or weekday name)?

I tried to figure it out in JavaScript, but I accept any other language.

I need to select a year to later build the full calendar (I thought using HTML tables and JavaScript), and for that I need to know at least the first day of the selected year.

I haven't found a solution or a question specifically dealing with finding the first day of any given year such that you only need to pass 1995, 2007, 1891. So if it's a repeated question please point the solution.

Do you have at least an online chart or DHTML site where I can see any full calendar for any year visually in that way?

share|improve this question
1  
The first day of any given year is January 1st. –  asawyer Jul 26 '11 at 19:07
1  
The first day of any given year is January 1st...in some cultures. –  hatchet Jul 26 '11 at 19:09
2  
@asawyer He wants the day of the week, he wrote day being 1 to 7, or weekday name –  phlogratos Jul 26 '11 at 19:10
    
possible duplicate of JavaScript - get the first day of the week from current date –  Adam Liss Apr 30 '12 at 0:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Javascript you can use this:

getWeekDay = function (year) {
  var d = new Date(); 
  d.setFullYear(year,0,1);
  return d.getDay()+1;
};

document.write(getWeekDay(2011));

Result is 1..7, as requested.

share|improve this answer
2  
The result will be 0-6, unless you add 1, as that's what JavaScript returns from Date.getDay MDN Date Documentation –  twip Jul 26 '11 at 19:24
    
@twip thanks, fixed it –  phlogratos Jul 26 '11 at 19:26
    
Just pointing out that it returns 0 to 6. It's just a matter of adding 1 to the result to get 1 to 7. –  alt.126 Jul 26 '11 at 21:20

This site http://5dspace-time.org/Calendar/Algorithm.html has a good explanation on how to calculate it even with pencil-and-paper

Wikipedia explains it too

share|improve this answer

At this Wikipedia article, look for Sakamoto's algorithm.

share|improve this answer

Pretty easy with C# and .NET:

using System;

public class SomeClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        DateTime dt = new DateTime(2000,1,1);
        Console.WriteLine(dt.DayOfWeek);

        dt = new DateTime(2010,1,1);
        Console.WriteLine(dt.DayOfWeek);
    }
}

Output:

Saturday 
Friday

The Java version:

import java.util.Date;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;

public class test3
{
    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        GregorianCalendar c = new GregorianCalendar(2000,1,1);  
        Date d = c.getTime();
        System.out.println(d.getDay());

        c = new GregorianCalendar(2010,1,1);    
        d = c.getTime();
        System.out.println(d.getDay());
    }
}

Output:

2
1
share|improve this answer
1  
Date.getDay is deprecated, and I believe the results will depend on your time zone. Not a good idea. c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) is more appropriate. –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '11 at 19:25

With .NET's BCL:

return new DateTime(year, 1, 1).DayOfWeek; // DayOfWeek enum value

In Noda Time:

return new LocalDate(year, 1, 1).IsoDayOfWeek; // IsoDayOfWeek enum value

In Java using the built-in classes:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.set(year, 1, 1);
return calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK); // 1 (Sunday) - 7 (Saturday)

In Java using Joda Time:

return new LocalDate(year, 1, 1).getDayOfWeek(); // 1 (Monday) - 7 (Sunday)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.