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When I try to compile the following:

public static delegate void MoveDelegate (Actor sender, MoveDirection args);

I receive, as an error: "The modifer 'static' is not valid for the this item."

I'm implementing this within a singleton, with a separate class which calls the delegate. The problem is that when I use the singleton instance within the other class to call the delegate (from the identifier, not the type), I can't do that for whatever reason, even when I declare the delegate non-static. Obviously, I can only refer to it via the type directly if and only if the delegate is static.

What is the reasoning behind this? I am using MonoDevelop 2.4.2.

update

After trying one of the suggestions with the following code:

public void Move(MoveDirection moveDir)
{
    ProcessMove(moveDir);
}

public void ProcessMove(MoveDirection moveDir)
{
    Teleporter.MoveMethod mm = new Teleporter.MoveMethod(Move); 
    moveDelegate(this, moveDir);
}

I've received a processing error, which states that the MoveMethod must be a type, and not an identifier.

share|improve this question
    
I think a little code example will help you explaining the problem. I read second paragraph five times and still have no idea what and how you want to accomplish. –  Dan Jul 26 '11 at 20:07
    
What is the purpose of the mm variable in the ProcessMove method? If some delegate (either static or instance) is assigned to moveDelegate, then calling moveDelegate will call the assigned delegate, as it should. –  Groo Jul 26 '11 at 20:40
    
I think interfaces are better for this. Please see my answer –  Dan Jul 26 '11 at 22:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this:

public delegate void MoveDelegate(object o);
public static MoveDelegate MoveMethod;

So the method-variable can be defined static. The keyword static has no meaning for the delegate definition , just like enum or const definitions.

An example of how to assign the static method-field:

public class A
{
  public delegate void MoveDelegate(object o);
  public static MoveDelegate MoveMethod;
}

public class B
{
  public static void MoveIt(object o)
  {
    // Do something
  }    
}

public class C
{
  public void Assign()
  {
    A.MoveMethod = B.MoveIt;
  }

  public void DoSomething()
  {
    if (A.MoveMethod!=null)
      A.MoveMethod(new object()); 
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not quite following. Is that supposed to be a public field, or a method? If it's a field, is it supposed to refer to an instance of a delegate? When I try to reference it within my other class, I get an error :/. –  blissfreak Jul 26 '11 at 20:12
    
I added an example. As you can see, the static method-variable works like a static field. –  C.Zonnenberg Jul 26 '11 at 20:21
    
The statement " just like enum or const definitions" does not sound correct. const is by default static in nature so we cant have static for const type fields. Example given is good. –  Dhananjay Nov 21 '13 at 14:03

You are declaring a delegate type. It doesn't make any sense to declare it as static. You could declare an instance of your delegate type as static, though.

public delegate void BoringDelegate();


internal class Bar {
    public static BoringDelegate NoOp;
    static Bar() {
        NoOp = () => { };
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A delegate declaration basically declares a method signature. That is why it doesn't make sense to make it neither static nor instance.

Once you have declared your delegate as:

public delegate void MoveDelegate (Actor sender, MoveDirection args);

it means that any delegate of this type must point to a method which accepts one Actor parameter, one MoveDirection parameter, and returns void.

Once you have declared the delegate type, you can create a field of that delegate type:

private MoveDelegate _myMoveDelegate;

and remember that the method should have a matching signature:

// parameters and return type must match!
public void Move(Actor actor, MoveDirection moveDir)
{
    ProcessMove (moveDir);
}

then you can assign this method to a delegate at some other place:

private void SomeOtherMethod()
{
     // get a reference to the Move method
     _myMoveDelegate = Move;

     // or, alternatively the longer version:
     // _myMoveDelegate = new MoveDelegate(Move);

     // and then simply call the Move method indirectly
     _myMoveDelegate(someActor, someDirection);
}

It is useful to know that .NET (starting from version v3.5) provides some predefined generic delegates (Action and Func) which can be used instead of declaring your own delegates:

// you can simply use the Action delegate to declare the
// method which accepts these same parameters
private Action<Actor, MoveDirection> _myMoveDelegate;

Using those delegates is IMHO more readable, since you can immediately identify parameters' signature from looking at the delegate itself (while in your case one needs to look for the declaration).

share|improve this answer

Delegate declaration is actually a type declaration. It cannot be static, just like you cannot define a static enum or structure.

However, I would rather use an interface instead of raw delegate.

Consider this:

public interface IGameStrategy {
    void Move(Actor actor, MoveDirection direction);
}

public class ConsoleGameStrategy : IGameStrategy {
    public void Move(Actor actor, MoveDirection direction)
    {
        // basic console implementation
        Console.WriteLine("{0} moved {1}", actor.Name, direction);
    }
}

public class Actor {
    private IGameStrategy strategy; // hold a reference to strategy

    public string Name { get; set; }    

    public Actor(IGameStrategy strategy)
    {
        this.strategy = strategy;
    }

    public void RunForrestRun()
    {
        // whenever I want to move this actor, I may call strategy.Move() method

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            strategy.Move(this, MoveDirection.Forward);
    }
}

In your calling code:

var strategy = new ConsoleGameStrategy();

// when creating Actors, specify the strategy you want to use
var actor = new Actor(strategy) { Name = "Forrest Gump" };
actor.RunForrestRun(); // will write to console

This similar in spirit to Strategy design pattern and allows you to decouple Actor movement from the actual implementation strategy (console, graphic, whatever). Other strategy methods may later be required which makes it a better choice than a delegate.

Finally, you can use an Inversion of Control framework to automatically inject correct strategy instance in your Actor classes so there is no need for manual initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to write a text based game engine which allows me to create objects and move them around the map, displaying their object coordinates to the console. This is to be done before any GUI, graphics, etc. is added. I'm at the point where I decided to create a teleporter class, which I made a singleton, to use to move any object around to a specific destination. For now I keep it simple: MoveDirection.Forward, or MoveDirection.Backward. If you want me to post source, let me know. –  blissfreak Jul 26 '11 at 20:19
    
@Holland: I'd rather go with interfaces (if I got your problem right). Please see my edit. –  Dan Jul 26 '11 at 22:07

define your delegate, in your static class declare an instance variable for it.

public delegate void MoveDelegate (Actor sender, MoveDirection args);

public static MyClass
{
     public static MoveDelegate MoveDelegateInstance;
}
share|improve this answer

Remove the keyword new when constructing your delegate

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