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I'm learning jQuery, and I'm trying to find a simple code example that will poll an API for a condition. (ie, request a webpage every few seconds and process the results)

I'm familiar with how to do AJAX in jQuery, I just can't seem to find the "proper" way of getting it to execute on a "timer".

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4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted
function doPoll(){
    $.post('ajax/test.html', function(data) {
        alert(data);  // process results here
        setTimeout(doPoll,5000);
    });
}
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1  
some people have used setTimeout and some have used setInterval. Why would one be preferred to another? –  Mike Jul 26 '11 at 21:40
22  
setinterval would make an ajax call every 5 seconds no matter what. the way have written it (which i believe is good practice) will wait for the results THEN make another ajax request 5 seconds later. there are times i would use setinterval, but this is not one of them. we should not be making any new requests until we get the results from the last request –  Johnny Craig Jul 26 '11 at 21:47
37  
Please beware though that the suggested code will stop polling if a single request fails. In a typical scenario you would probably want to continue polling anyway. I would not have setTimeout within the success handler but instead chain the ajax call with jQuery always. Like this: $.post('ajax/test.html') .done(function(data) { /* process */ }) .always(function() { setTimeout(doPoll, 5000); }); –  Mårten Wikström May 6 '13 at 19:21
    
When I had an input parameter to my doPoll function like setTimeout(doPoll(id), 5000); the call had to be wrapped in a function in order to work. setTimeout(function() {doPoll(id); }, 5000); –  David Jan 28 at 12:47

Here's a helpful article on long polling (long-held HTTP request) using jQuery. A code snippet derived from this article:

(function poll() {
    setTimeout(function() {
        $.ajax({
            url: "/server/api/function",
            type: "GET",
            success: function(data) {
                console.log("polling");
            },
            dataType: "json",
            complete: poll,
            timeout: 2000
        })
    }, 5000);
})();

This will make the next request only after the ajax request has completed.

A variation on the above that will execute immediately the first time it is called before honouring the wait/timeout interval.

(function poll() {
    $.ajax({
        url: "/server/api/function",
        type: "GET",
        success: function(data) {
            console.log("polling");
        },
        dataType: "json",
        complete: setTimeout(function() {poll()}, 5000),
        timeout: 2000
    })
})();
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function make_call()
{
  // do the request

  setTimeout(function(){ 
    make_call();
  }, 5000);
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  make_call();
});
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function poll(){
    $("ajax.php", function(data){
        //do stuff  
    }); 
}

setInterval(function(){ poll(); }, 5000);
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