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I'm trying to use Bison to generate a parser, in C++. The grammar is fine, but I'm having some quick trouble with the actions. Here's a simple sample:

statements
: statement
| statements statement;

As far as I know, this is a pretty normal thing to do. The question I have is which is derived first. For example, if I have an input which looks like

statement statement statement statement

does Bison call my actions as

statement (statement (statement (statement))))

or

(((statement) statement) statement) statement

I'm trying to construct a linked list of the rules invoked here, and I want to keep the list in the same order as was input. Right now, I've got

statements
: statement
{ 
  $$ = $1; 
}
| statements statement
{ 
  dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::Statement*>($1)->Next = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::Statement*>($2);
  $$ = $1;
};

Edit: OK, so I could do something like this:

switch_statement
: SWITCH '(' expression ')'
{ 
  auto Switch = p.Make<ParsedFile::SwitchStatement>();
  Switch->Test = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::Expression*>($3);
  p.NewScope();
  $$ = Switch;
}
'{' case_statements '}'
{
  auto Switch = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::SwitchStatement*>($5);
  Switch->Cases = p.statements.top();
  p.PopScope();
  p.AddToCurrentScope(Switch);
};

default_statement
: DEFAULT ':' 
{
  auto Default = p.Make<ParsedFile::DefaultStatement>();
  p.NewScope();
  $$ = Default;
}
statements
{
  auto Default = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::DefaultStatement*>($3);
  Default->Statements = p.statements.top();
  p.PopScope();
  p.AddToCurrentScope(Default);
};

case_statement
: CASE expression 
{
  auto case = p.Make<ParsedFile::CaseStatement>();
  p->Value = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::Expression*>($2);
  p.NewScope();
  $$ = case;
}
DOUBLE_COLON statements
{
  auto Case = dynamic_cast<ParsedFile::CaseStatement*>($3);
  Case->Statements = p.statements.top();
  p.PopScope();
  p.AddToCurrentScope(Case); 
};

case_statements
: case_statement
| case_statements case_statement
| case_statements default_statement;
share|improve this question
    
Why the downvote? –  Praetorian Jul 26 '11 at 20:48
    
@DeadMG: note that, because you append $2 to $1, then "return" $1 through $$, you'll reset the same node's Next pointer after the next derivation. If you desperately want a linked list (why not a vector or deque?), you must keep pointers to both its head and its tail. –  larsmans Jul 26 '11 at 20:53
    
@larsmans: I'm not using a vector or deque because I've nowhere to store it that I can depend on. There may be several statements in a stack (C-style grammar) and Bison doesn't really provide for keeping around complex containers. Actually, come to think of it, I never twigged that they would be an actual stack, so I could just store it in my user-provided argument, and use mid-rule arguments to push and pop it. –  Puppy Jul 26 '11 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It associates to the left, i.e.

(((statement) statement) statement) statement

You can tell that this is the only possibility because this can be reduced to statements statement, which is one of your productions. The other option

statement (statement (statement (statement))))

would have to be reduced to statement statements, which is not one of your productions. However, you can use this if you want right-associativity instead.

Your code will not produce a linked list as-is, because after joining one statement with the other, you return a pointer to the first statement, so when the next statement comes around you're overwriting the Next pointer of the first statement.

Changing the order to right associative should solve this, but note that this will require linear parser stack space in the number of statements. If you expect many statements you should therefore consider building the linked list in reverse.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. I edited my OP to reflect a different strategy to the same problem- I'd appreciate your response. If not, then I will accept your answer as it does answer the original question. –  Puppy Jul 26 '11 at 21:14
    
@DeadMG: I tend to avoid writing stateful code in actions, as it can be hard to follow the order of things. Consider writing your actions in the form $$ = foo($1, $2). The order is then the same as if you'd written foo(foo(foo(bar(first), second), third), fourth). –  hammar Jul 26 '11 at 21:36
    
I need that kind of thing for scopes, to determine the correct scope to use. Doing it the other way I think just wasn't viable. For scope-less constructs like expressions, however, they will be built functionally rather than statefully. –  Puppy Jul 26 '11 at 23:05

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