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Let's say we've got the following:

IFirst = Interface(IUnknown)    
  function GetStuff: Integer;
end;

ISecond = Interface(IUnknown)
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
end;

TFirstSecond = class(TInterfacedObject, IFirst, ISecond)    
private 
  function GetStuff: Integer;        //implementation of IFirst
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;   //implementation of ISecond;
end;

I have never liked the fact that in TInterfacedObject there seems to be no way to distinguish between which methods implement which interfaces. Am I missing something? Does anyone know a way structure the code to do that? To designate that GetStuff is the implementation of IFirst and GetOtherStuff is the implementation of ISecond? ('Put a comment' is not the answer I'm looking for...)

I know I can use the 'implements' directive to define properties in TFirstSecond for each interface and delegate the implementations to instances contained within TFirstSecond, thereby segregating everything. But I'd like a shortcut...

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@daemon_x - thanks for the nice edit - I was in a big hurry when I posted. –  Vector Jul 27 '11 at 3:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the case you post, I prefer comments (interface name just as NGLN puts it) too, but I would like to explain why the implements keyword can be the best solution in some other cases, just not in trivial cases where there's only one method per interface as in your trivial sample.

I know you said you know about Implements; but for people coming along who have not seen it, I'd like to document when it IS useful, bear with me. It is even worthwhile having all the extra work of having more classes, in some cases.

So I would use implements not as a shortcut (as you see it's longer!) but only when each interface involves 100 methods to be implemented, and where the resulting design has less coupling, and better cohesion and readability only.

So this is an admittedly silly example, but if each of IFirst and ISecond had 100 methods, then it might be a great leap forward...

type
IFirst = interface
  function GetStuff: Integer;
end;

ISecond = interface
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
end;

TFirstLogic = class(TInterfacedObject, IFirst)
  function GetStuff: Integer;

end;

TSecondLogic = class(TInterfacedObject, ISecond)
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
end;

TFirstSecond = class(TInterfacedObject, IFirst, ISecond)
private
  FFirst:TFirstLogic;
  FSecond:TSecondLogic;
protected


  property First:TFirstLogic read FFirst implements IFirst;
  property Second:TSecondLogic read FSecond implements ISecond;
public
  constructor Create; // don't forget to create and free FFirst/FSecond.
  destructor Destroy; override; // don't forget to create and free FFirst/FSecond.


end;

You could say Implements is the only way we could do "partial classes", or at least create one composite class that implements a bunch of interfaces, and have a bunch of sub-properties (which are protected or perhaps even private) used to do the "implements" delegation. If you move everything else right out of the unit that contains the aggregating class, you could have a really clean design.

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there are 2 or possibly 3 interfaces, each with 15/20 functions. I inherited a big bowl of spaghetti to untangle - and I would have started implementing delegation already - realized this afternoon that I really have to - but I've got time constraints and I already have a lot of new code, so I was looking for something quick that I could use just to enforce some organization and get something 'out the door'. So, I'll give you credit for the answer since you took the time to educate the public and start on delegation tomorrow AM... –  Vector Jul 27 '11 at 2:54
    
@mikey perhaps you could edit the question to remove the bit that says you don't want to use delegation! –  David Heffernan Jul 27 '11 at 6:38
    
Well he didn't, but he SHOULD use delegation, if he has 2/3 interfaces with 15/20 functions each. (maybe put THAT in the question). –  Warren P Jul 27 '11 at 12:18
    
@warren it's written right in the title of the Q –  David Heffernan Jul 27 '11 at 12:48
    
I think the title got changed. I would have put the title "I don't want to use delegation, but I want to have delegation occur... What should I do?" :-) –  Warren P Jul 27 '11 at 17:02

I suppose the only thing you can really do without using comments is to add method resolution clauses:

IFirst = interface
  function GetStuff: Integer;
end;

ISecond = interface
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
end;

TFirstSecond = class(TInterfacedObject, IFirst, ISecond)
private
  function GetStuff: Integer;
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
public
  function IFirst.GetStuff = GetStuff;
  function ISecond.GetOtherStuff = GetOtherStuff;
end;

I don't think this really adds very much to the mix, and I personally would consider this worse than without the method resolution clauses.

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot about that construct and you've reminded me - and although I don't think it's so bad (what is your problem with it? Redundancy?) I don't think it really solves the problem because my concern is mostly in my implementation section of the code - If I've got 10 complex methods each for 2 interfaces, I'd like the code to self define what interface it's implementing. Method resolution is really not designed for this - it's just a way to avoid name clashing. I suppose I'll have to either live with the messiness or 'man up' and use delegation... –  Vector Jul 26 '11 at 22:37
    
what you are looking for does not exist I believe –  David Heffernan Jul 26 '11 at 22:44
1  
{implementing ISomething} for human benefit really should be a comment, and that's that. –  Warren P Jul 27 '11 at 0:12
    
Method resolution clauses ARE however really really great when you HAVE to disambiguate two method names that would otherwise collide (Of course in that case, I would prefer 100% to disambiguate by delegation only). –  Warren P Jul 27 '11 at 12:20

Although you are specifically asking for an answer not involving comments, may I say that using comments is the common solution by more then just the Delphi VCL, as follows to be precise:

TFirstSecond = class(TInterfacedObject, IFirst, ISecond)
private
  { IFirst }
  function GetStuff: Integer;
private
  { ISecond }
  function GetOtherStuff: Integer;
end;
share|improve this answer
3  
It's only the human that needs help, thus, it's only the comments that should change. Code is for computers (and readable by you too), but if it's your brain that needs the info, comments are ideal.+ –  Warren P Jul 27 '11 at 0:02
    
@warren - "Code is for computers" - not sure I agree on that.. –  Vector Jul 27 '11 at 2:58
    
if it was only the interface section, comments would indeed suffice - as I explained in my comments to David, it's the implementation that I'm more concerned about. And that being the case, seems the consensus is that delegation is the only way. –  Vector Jul 27 '11 at 3:00
1  
Hmmm, I would wonder why the implementation is of any concern at all. In the interface, seeing which parts of the class are present to satisfy an interface (contract) is understandable, but beyond that, how the implementation is organised is entirely irrelevant to any questions about which methods are there for interfaces etc, and organisation for more efficient navigation becomes the key. e.g. I put all my getter/setter methods after constructor/destructors but before any "real" methods, and simply alphabetic order applies... [..cont.] –  Deltics Jul 27 '11 at 3:06
    
[..cont..] if I need to navigate between interface and implementation sections I invariably use ctrl-up/down so using one as an "index" to and concretely reflecting the organisation of the other is unnecessary. If I am on a method "Foo" and want to get to a method "Bar" that I know exists, I know it comes before "Foo" (alphabetically). Meanwhile in the interface I can document that Foo is part of one interface contract and Bar part of another, and the interface that provides Bar may come before Foo. Just an example. –  Deltics Jul 27 '11 at 3:09

D2006 (but probably earlier versions as well, D2006 is just the earliest I have available at the moment), supports "mapping" of interface methods to specific class functions. This gets rid of the necessity to have a property as you do with the implements keyword.

Using interface mapping should also be a way to remove ambiguity when two interfaces contain the same method signature but need different implementations.

Example:

IMyFirstInterface = interface(IInterface)
  procedure DoSomethingInteresting;
  procedure DoSomethingElse;
end;

IMySecondInterface = interface(IInterface)
  procedure DoSomethingInteresting;
end;

TMyCombinedObject = class(TInterfacedObject, IMyFirstInterface, IMySecondInterface)
private
  // Interface mappings 
  procedure IMyFirstInterface.DoSomethingInteresting = DoSomethingInterestingFirst;
  procedure IMySecondInterface.DoSomethingInteresting = DoSomethingInterestingSecond;
protected
  procedure DoSomethingInterestingFirst;
  procedure DoSomethingInterestingSecond;
  procedure DoSomethingElse;
end;

Drawback if you have lots of interfaces or lots of methods: repetition. However, as you can see in the example, you do not need to specify mappings for all methods in an interface.

For documentation purposes you could put the mapping directly with the actual method declaration, so they stay together and are less likely to get out of sync (or rather that the mappings will miss new methods, as you do not need to declare a mapping for each interface method):

TMyCombinedObject = class(TInterfacedObject, IMyFirstInterface, IMySecondInterface)
protected
  procedure IMyFirstInterface.DoSomethingInteresting = DoSomethingInterestingFirst;
  procedure DoSomethingInterestingFirst;

  procedure IMySecondInterface.DoSomethingInteresting = DoSomethingInterestingSecond;
  procedure DoSomethingInterestingSecond;

  procedure DoSomethingElse;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
See David's answer above and accompanying comments. Tnx –  Vector Jul 27 '11 at 13:14
    
You are quite right. Somehow didn't spot that one before I answered... –  Marjan Venema Jul 27 '11 at 16:45
    
Sorry for bringing up this old thread, but does anyone have a clue why there is this new syntax compared to property [...] implements? Why wouldn't procedure DoSomethingInterestingFirst implements IMyFirstInterface.DoSomethingInteresting; have been chosen? –  Thijs van Dien Apr 30 at 14:41

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