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If I have a string in JavaScript what's the best way to go about counting the number of bytes or bits the string takes up?

My first thought is that, since the EcmaScript spec (5.1) states in 8.4 that string elements in EcmaScript consist of 16 bits values, and that the languages uses UTF-16 character encoding, I should get the Decimal representation of that (charCodeAt), divide that by two, floor the result, and Bob's your father's brother.

But if I were to convert each character to binary (toString(2)), in order to count the bits, do I count the 0's as well as the 1's? Or just the 1's?

From what I've read online (and the information is sparse), I'm thinking it's something like:

Math.floor("A".charCodeAt(0) / 2); // 32 bits... No?
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This is rather confusing. A string of length N over an alphabet of M-byte symbols takes N x M bytes to represent... it's as simple as that. It takes 8 times that many bits. –  Patrick87 Jul 26 '11 at 21:05
    
@shelman Yeah, but do I count the 0's as well as the 1's in binary? Or just the 1's, since 1's represent the "on" state, and 0 the "off" state. –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 21:07
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UTF-16 is not a fixed-width encoding (unicode.org/faq/utf_bom.html#utf16-1). A character may occupy 16 or 32 bits, though usually it will fit into 16. –  Krab Jul 26 '11 at 21:09
    
You count it all. The computer has to store all the bits, because there are many 8-digit binary strings with the same number of '1's, but they're not all the same number. –  Patrick87 Jul 26 '11 at 21:10
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You need to count both the 0's and 1's if someone asks you just to count the bits. Remember that "bit" is at heart a measure of information content. SO if you have a field that has an information content of 16 bits, that means there are 2^16 possible configurations, of which your current configuration is just one. Your bit string is one of those configurations, but you need the zeros to tell if from other configurations with 16 bits. –  Charlie Martin Jul 26 '11 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

@Charlie So 01000001 is simply 8 bits? Cool. Can you turn this into an answer so I can up vote it?

Exactly, see below.

You need to count both the 0's and 1's if someone asks you just to count the bits. Remember that "bit" is at heart a measure of information content. SO if you have a field that has an information content of 16 bits, that means there are 2^16 possible configurations, of which your current configuration is just one. Your bit string is one of those configurations, but you need the zeros to tell if from other configurations with 16 bits. – Charlie Martin yesterday

also, do you know of any good books on this? I'm self taught (until uni next year). :) – Tom yesterday

I don't, honestly. I googled some, and I keep getting things that teach how to turn on the computer, something you've clearly already mastered. You might try Think like a Computer Scientist.

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Um, if each element in the string is 16 bits, won't the number of bits the string takes up just be string.length * 16?

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I could, but would that be a true representation of how much memory is consumed by the string?I'm using this for localStorage space management, and I want to put quotas on how much data can be saved, so I need to be constantly counting, y'know? –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 21:18

Maybe this document from twitters dev site helps a bit?

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Thanks dude! It helped. :) –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 21:35

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