Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So for example I have a simple HTML form:

      <h3>
            <a href="#">Login</a>
        </h3>
        <div id="tabs-login">
            <form method="get" action="./dev.html">
                <fieldset>
                    <legend>
                        Email:
                    </legend>
                    <input type="text" class="required email" name="login" />
                </fieldset>
                <fieldset>
                    <legend>
                        Password:
                    </legend>
                    <input type="password" class="required" name="pass" />
                </fieldset>
                <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
            </form>
        </div>

And I use jQuery to validte it:

    <script>
      $(document).ready(function() { $("form").validate(); });
    </script>

I want on form submition to take user inputed password value and take SHA256 from it via this jQuery plugin and submit email=user-inputed-value and pass=sha-value. How to access validated values via jQuery and change them and send to original form destination?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First -- I want to point out that I don't think this is a good idea. It's generally a bad idea to implement password hashing on the client side. Instead, the pass should be sent in plain text (over HTTPS) to the server, where it is then hashed using your preferred algorithm before storage. This has the added benefit of not advertising to potential attackers which hashing method is used, since that code exists only on the server.

That said: you're going to want to calculate that SHA value prior to form submit.

You could bind an event handler to the password field's blur event to update a hidden field's value with the new hash. Or you could add the update logic to the validation code.

Regardless of where the extra code goes, it will be much easier for you to prepare the hash prior to the form submit than it will be to send a second submission chasing after the first.

E.g.

<!-- add this to the form -->
<input type="hidden" name="sha_pass" value="" />

// add this to the document ready handler
$('[name=pass]').blur(function() {
    $('[name=sha_pass]').val($.sha256($(this).val());
});
share|improve this answer
    
Grate!) Could you show how to implement hidden value change on pas value hange? and how to lock form submition until that shadow value is calculated? –  Rella Jul 26 '11 at 23:20
    
Code added. The snippet of HTML adds a place in the form for the calculated value to go. The JS below that sets it up so that, when focus leaves the password field, the browser automatically re-calculates the SHA value and stuffs it into the hidden field. –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 23:26
    
I see people upvoting my answer -- which is great -- but this makes me want to reiterate what I said at the top: this is a bad way to implement security. Hashing should be done on the server side for a variety of reasons, the most important of which are all related to security design. The sample code here should work, but this is the wrong approach. –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 23:39
    
I already have encription on storing into DB=) I want to use SHA encoding on client side to protect users from having thare plain text passwords protected at least a bit=) –  Rella Jul 26 '11 at 23:43
    
Fair enough. :-) –  Tom Jul 26 '11 at 23:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.