Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey i'm trying to make a Button template class, which is constructed with the the button would recieve when pressed (such as mouse position), and a pointer to the function that should be called.

However buttons often return void and take no arguments (Buttons that you press and something happens: they don't take any arguments, they're pressed and then just do something.) so how would i generate the classes member functions since apparently i can't have void as an argument type?

Here's the source if it's helpful:

    template<typename Return = void, typename Arg1 = void, typename Arg2 = void> 
class Button 
{
private:
    boost::function<Return (Arg1, Arg2)> Function;
    //Return (*Function)(Arg1, Arg2);              // this didn't work so i tried boost::function

public:
    void Activate(Arg1, Arg2){ Function(Arg1, Arg2) ;};

    void SetFunction(Return (*Function)(Arg1, Arg2)){
        this->Function= Function;};

    //constructors
    Button(){ Function= 0;};

    Button( Return (*Function)(Arg1, Arg2)){  
        this->Function = &Function; };
};
share|improve this question
    
How do you want to use your template? What do you mean by buttons often return void and take no args? What buttons are you referring to? –  Jaime Jul 27 '11 at 0:53
    
@Jaime: Buttons that you press and something happens: they don't take any arguments, they're pressed and then just do something. –  Griffin Jul 27 '11 at 0:58
2  
Buttons are graphical elements that generate events (ie click), you 'hook' functions to respond to those events and thats how the button 'does' it's thing.. The ui framework defines the signature that you should implement to respond to those events (type of args and return types) so How do you want to use your template? What's the purpose for it and maybe we can come up with some suggestion on how to go about it –  Jaime Jul 27 '11 at 1:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can specify a template specification of type void, for example, you could use the following variations of the templated class, button:

template <typename rtnVal, typename Val1, typename Val2>
class Button {
private:
    rtnVal(*Function)( Val1 val1, Val2 val2 );

public:
    Button() : Function( nullptr ) {}

    void SetFunction( rtnVal(*func)(Val1, Val2) ) {
        Function = func;
    }

    rtnVal RunFunction( Val1 val1, Val2 val2 ) { return Function( val1, val2 ); }
};

// Special void type, accepting arguments overload:
template < typename Val1, typename Val2 >
class Button< void, Val1, Val2 > {
private:
    void(*Function)(Val1 val1, Val2 val2);

public:
    Button() : Function( nullptr ) {}

    void SetFunction( void(*func)(Val1, Val2) ) {
        Function = func;
    }

    void RunFunction( Val1 val1, Val2 val2 ) { return Function( val1, val2 ); }

};

// Pure void type:
template<>
class Button<void, void, void> {
private:
    void(*Function)( void );

public:
    Button() : Function( nullptr ) {}

    void SetFunction( void(*func)() ) {
        Function = func;
    }

    void RunFunction() { 
        return Function();
    }
};

This then allows you to initialize and use void as arguments, for example, given a void function Print() the following would now be valid:

void Print()
{
    std::cout << "Function has been called" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    Button< void, void, void > btn;

    btn.SetFunction( Print );

    btn.RunFunction();

    std::cout << "Finished";
}

I hope this helps to clear things up! :)

Note: nullptr is a C++0x keyword, if your compiler hasn't implemented it use #define nullptr 0

share|improve this answer
    
YES. I didn't know you could ovveride a class with different templates! One question though: If i were to put other member data/functions inside the base class template, would the other overloads also automatically contain those too? Or would i have to copy EVERYTHING each template overload, and not just the functions that depend on what the template is? –  Griffin Jul 27 '11 at 6:02
    
You need to re-declare the member functions/variables unfortunately, although, depending on how you've specialized it would just be a matter of copy and pasting with a few changes. –  Shaktal Jul 27 '11 at 10:53

if i follow you want to have it so the user can have 0-2 args for the params?

if you are willing to use c++0x then you can use a variadic template. This will allow you to use as many or as few args as you need.

share|improve this answer
    
Many compilers haven't yet implemented variadic templates, besides, template specialization provides a neater and more intuitive way of solving the OPs issue. –  Shaktal Jul 27 '11 at 1:27
    
Would you suggest learning Ox right now to a programmer with about 5 months experience? A lot of people have been suggesting it lately... –  Griffin Jul 27 '11 at 6:04
    
You can begin to learn the C++0x standard whenever you feel you would like to. However, a lot of the C++0x standard is designed to make advanced programming concepts easier to implement, so you will most likely only find use of them when you have a bit more experience. :) –  Shaktal Jul 27 '11 at 10:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.