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I have two sets of header files and .c files in my project i will only ever be including one of these headers but i want the option to quickly swap the header im including. Both header files have some declarations that are exactly the same but the implementations in the .c files are different. Basically what i need is way to tell the complier to only compile the .c file that is associated with the header im including elsewhere in my program.

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3 Answers

You could always specify the .c or .o file that you're going to link against at compile/link time for instance

gcc -o myexe file1.c/file1.o
or
gcc -o myexe file2.c/file2.o

you could even make this a different make directive if you have a makefile if you have the same header file but 2 different implementations. I would recommend just using 1 header file and changing the underlying implementation, no point in having 2 headers with similar declarations.

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If both header files are exactly the same then you don't need to maintain two header files. You can keep only one copy. Whichever code includes the header file can include this single header file only.

You can always specify which .c file you want to compile while compiling. In gcc, you can mention the C file to be compiled in the command line. In Visual Studio, you can include the correct C file.

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I guess you should maintain only one header file and include that in your code. Introduce a flag to the makefile to link which implementation to be linked. You have not mentioned what are you using to build.

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im using xcode but i think ill just change the names of the functions in each header since although it would be nice to keep function calls the same its not really that big of a deal thanks anyways (: –  A Person Jul 27 '11 at 4:41
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