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I've got a number of classes designed to handle objects of specific types.

e.g.,

class FooHandler : Handler<Foo> {
   void ProcessMessage(Foo foo);
}

where the handler interface might be defined something like this:

interface Handler<T> {
   void ProcessMessage(T obj);
}

Now, I'd like to be able to use a dictionary of these handlers:

Dictionary<Type, Handler> handlers;

void ProcessMessage(object message) {
   var handler = handlers[message.GetType()];
   handler.ProcessMessage(handler);
}

However, C# doesn't appear to allow me to use the Handler interface without specifying a type. C# also doesn't allow me to declare interface Handler<out T> so I can't use Handler<object> in the handlers declaration.

Even this doesn't work:

Dictionary<Type, object> handlers;

void ProcessMessage(object message) {
   dynamic handler = handlers[message.GetType()];
   handler.ProcessMessage(message);
}

This seems to be solvable using reflection:

handler.GetType().GetMethod("ProcessMessage").Invoke(handler, new object[] { message });

And, of course, I could remove the generics from the Handler interface. However, the reason I went down this path is that I wanted to make the API for handlers as simple as possible. I wanted classes to specify the messages they receive and for them to be able to process those messages without having to cast the parameters in every method.

I'd prefer to avoid reflection if possible and avoiding generics altogether doesn't quite seem satisfactory.

Am I missing something obvious or am I pushing up against the limits of C#'s generics?

I realize that C# isn't Java (with Java's type erasure, this would be easy) and perhaps this might have been better solved in a more C#-like way... so I'm also interested in other approaches.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I find the ability to supply any arbitrary type as a "message" to be rather suspect. I mean, how can an object or Point be a message? I'd refactor so all the possible messages share an interface, say, IMessage. I'd also make the code a bit clearer, IMO. –  Kyte Jul 27 '11 at 6:28
    
Yeah, I am using a base interface IMessage, but I left out such details for simplicity. –  Ben Jul 27 '11 at 6:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is a better way. Just embed the cast in a lambda and store the action rather than the handler:

    Dictionary<Type, Action<object>> handlers;

    void AddHandler<T>( Handler<T> handler )
    {
        handlers.Add(typeof(T), m => handler.ProcessMessage((T)m));
    }

    void ProcessMessage(object message)
    {
        var handler = handlers[message.GetType()];
        handler(message);
    }

OK, this goes beyond the scope of the question a bit, but the discussion in the comments led us here:

interface IMessage {}

class Foo : IMessage {}

interface Handler<T> where T : IMessage
{
    void ProcessMessage(T obj);
}

class FooHandler : Handler<Foo>
{
    public void ProcessMessage(Foo foo) {}
}

class Program
{
    static readonly Dictionary<Type, Action<object>> handlers = new Dictionary<Type, Action<object>>();

    static void AddHandler<T>(Handler<T> handler) where T : IMessage
    {
        handlers.Add(typeof(T), m => handler.ProcessMessage((T)m));
    }

    static void ProcessMessage(object message)
    {
        var handler = handlers[message.GetType()];
        handler(message);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Type> GetAllTypes()
    {
        return AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().SelectMany(a => a.GetTypes());
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Type> GetDerivedFrom<T>()
    {
        return GetAllTypes().Where(t => IsDerivedFrom(t, typeof(T)));
    }

    static bool IsDerivedFrom(Type t, Type parent)
    {
        return parent.IsAssignableFrom(t) && t!=parent;
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        var handlerTypes =
            from handlerBaseType in GetDerivedFrom<IMessage>().Select(t => typeof(Handler<>).MakeGenericType(t))
            select GetAllTypes().FirstOrDefault(t => IsDerivedFrom(t, handlerBaseType))
            into handlerType
            where handlerType!=null
            select Activator.CreateInstance(handlerType);

        foreach (object handler in handlerTypes)
        {
            AddHandler((dynamic)handler);
            Console.WriteLine("Registered {0}.", handler.GetType());
        }
    }
}

No strings involved... Of course, if you want to establish the convention by naming you could make the scanning easier and simply look up the handler type from the name of the message type as done in your comment. You could also replace the Activator.CreateInstance with an IOC container.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 pretty sleek! some indirection has never killed anyone. –  Eben Roux Jul 27 '11 at 6:55
    
Like it. This is a nice approach. I was taking the dictionary form as a given, but there's no reason it should be. –  Jon Skeet Jul 27 '11 at 6:58
    
Thanks! And based on Ben's latest comment I would replace object with IMessage. –  jdasilva Jul 27 '11 at 7:02
1  
Maybe I'm missing something, but how the list of handlers gets populated would be the same for all these solutions, right? I'm not seeing it that its different - it casts to Handler<T> so you have to at least know that to register them. –  jdasilva Jul 27 '11 at 7:07
1  
@Ben: Yes, the only difference is when the registration process only knows about the T as a Type rather than in a static way. But then you could use the same dynamic idea as in my answer for registration, but jdasilva's solution for execution which may be more efficient. –  Jon Skeet Jul 27 '11 at 7:22

I suspect that dynamic typing will work if you take it one step further:

void ProcessMessage(dynamic message) {
   dynamic handler = handlers[message.GetType()];
   handler.ProcessMessage(message);
}

Note how I've made message dynamic, so that the overload resolution will be applied using the actual type of the object, rather than with object.

Basically what you're trying to do isn't statically type-safe, which is why the C# compiler isn't letting you get away with it. This is fairly typical in situations where you only have a Type value at execution time.

One other option is to have a generic method yourself and execute that either with reflection or dynamic:

void ProcessMessage(dynamic message)
{
    // This will call the generic method with the right
    // type for T inferred from the actual type of the object
    // message refers to.
    ProcessMessageImpl(message);
}

void ProcessMessageImpl<T>(T message)
{
    Handler<T> handler = (Handler<T>) handlers[typeof(T)];
    handler.ProcessMessage(message);
}
share|improve this answer
    
interesting. I was wondering where I could use dynamic. Would this infer that the source must be passed in as dynamic, and not as an object? Or, does dynamic dynamically interpret what is inside an object? –  sgtz Jul 27 '11 at 6:39
    
@sgtz: Any type is implicitly convertible to dynamic, basically. But see my edit from just now - I've been trying to save it for ages, but with no 3G signal :( –  Jon Skeet Jul 27 '11 at 6:42
    
+1 @Jon: nice solution. I think I'll delete my answer from below. If we could dynamically deserialize life would be easier again. Normally we deserialize<T> here –  sgtz Jul 27 '11 at 6:49
    
Good stuff! Will only work with c# 4+ though :( –  Eben Roux Jul 27 '11 at 6:52
    
I'd be curious to know at 4 votes to 1 why a solution with dynamic would be preferred over what I proposed. –  jdasilva Jul 27 '11 at 6:52

You have your solution in using reflection :)

That is the only way I am aware of to do this. I am using this exact approach in my ESB.


EDIT

There is a caveat in using the other approaches (I may be wrong so please comment if I'm off track). It is fine when you are registering a 'singleton' handler with the known message type up-front. Using a generic <T> means you know the type. However, in my scenario I use transient handlers depending on the message type that arrives. So I create a new handler.

This means that everything has to be done on-the-fly thus requiring reflection (except maybe using dynamic in .net 4 --- I'm on .net 3.5).

Ideas?

share|improve this answer
    
Care to share an example? –  sgtz Jul 27 '11 at 6:42
    
@sgtz --- the example is in Ben's question :) –  Eben Roux Jul 27 '11 at 6:53
    
Would this work? ` void AddHandler<THandler,TMessage>() where THandler : Handler<TMessage>, new() { handlers.Add(typeof(TMessage), m => new THandler().ProcessMessage((TMessage)m)); }` –  jdasilva Jul 27 '11 at 7:24
    
I don't think so. I don't have a handlers collection. I have a handler factory that creates a new handler based on the received message type; so I use Activator.CreateInstance. I cannot use <T> since I don't know the type at compile time. –  Eben Roux Jul 27 '11 at 7:33
    
Do you look up the handler's type based on some convention as you receive the messages? Are you constructing the handler every time or on the first message of a particular type? –  jdasilva Jul 27 '11 at 7:48

I ended up doing an impementation of Jon's idea which is shared here.

public interface IHandler
{
    void ProcessMessage(dynamic message);
}

public class Handler<T> : IHandler
{
    public void ProcessMessage(dynamic message)
    {
    }
}

public class A{} public class B{} public class C{} public class D{}

public class HandlerA : IHandler{
    public void ProcessMessage(dynamic message){}
}

public class HandlerB  : IHandler{
    public void ProcessMessage(dynamic message) {}
}

public class HandlerC  : IHandler{
    public void ProcessMessage(dynamic message) {}
}

public class MsgProcessor
{
    public Dictionary<Type, IHandler> handlers = new Dictionary<Type, IHandler>();

    public void AddHandler<T>(T o) where T: IHandler
    {
        handlers.Add(typeof(T),o);
    }

    public void ProcessMessage(dynamic message)
    {
        ProcessMessage(message);
    }

    public void ProcessMessage<T>(T message)
    {
        Handler<T> handler = (Handler<T>) handlers[typeof (T)];
        handler.ProcessMessage(message);
    }
}

public class Test
{
    public void test()
    {
        var mp = new MsgProcessor();
        mp.AddHandler<HandlerA>(new HandlerA());
        mp.AddHandler<HandlerB>(new HandlerB());
        mp.AddHandler<HandlerC>(new HandlerC());

        mp.ProcessMessage(new A());
        mp.ProcessMessage(new B());
        mp.ProcessMessage(new C());

    }
}
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