Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is a base class:

template<class T_CLASS>
class TBase
{
  protected:
    static CSomeClass m_objSomeClass;

  public:
    inline void Set(CSomeClass f_objSomeClass) { m_objSomeClass = f_objSomeClass; }
};

And there are some sub classes which all shall have their own static member m_objSomeClass. I try to do this by templating the base class.

class CSub1 : public TBase<CSub1>
{
   //...
};

class CSub2 : public TBase<CSub2>
{
  //...
};

What does the definition for this look like? Is it even possible? I tried some... but none worked:

template<class T_CLASS>
CSomeClass TBase<T_CLASS>::m_objSomeClass;

//In fact the next one worked in Visual Studio; 
// but not in with the armcc where I need it.
CSomeClass TBase<CSub1>::m_objSomeClass;
CSomeClass TBase<CSub2>::m_objSomeClass;

Any suggestions? Thanks, Mirco

share|improve this question
    
The first approach should have worked: template <typename T> CSomeClass TBase<T>::m_objSomeClass;, so there must be something you are not showing in the code. Is CSomeClass dependent on the type argument? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 27 '11 at 10:02
    
I moved the definition to another source file and finally it is compiling and linking properly... Still I don't know what was wrong before. CSomeClassis in A.hpp, Base and Sub classes are in B.hpp, which includes A.hpp and the definition was in B.cpp. Anyways... thanks for the help! –  Mirco Jul 28 '11 at 9:20
1  
The definition must be accessible where the field is used. It is a templated definition, if you provide that in a cpp file then the compiler will not instantiate the static member –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 28 '11 at 10:58
    
@David Rodríguez, Could you please explain this in more detail? Now the definition is in D.cpp - so it is provided in a cpp file and everything works fine. In case there is one, I don't see the difference between a templated definition of a static member and a non-templated one. –  Mirco Jul 28 '11 at 14:44
1  
There is a long explanation, but it all boils down to the fact that if you do not provide the definition in the header and another cpp instantiates your template with a new type, then the compiler will not instantiate that static member for you (it has no definition to instantiate from). It is exactly the same reason why you should provide the function definitions for templates in headers, and it can be avoided in the exact same ways (provide it in a cpp and force the instantiation there for all types you need), but that removes genericity: new code cannot use different arguments. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 28 '11 at 15:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
template<>
CSomeClass TBase<CSub1>::m_objSomeClass;
template<>
CSomeClass TBase<CSub2>::m_objSomeClass;

is the one of the correct ways, if you want to explicitly have static member defined for a solid class like CSub1, CSub2. Demo.

Edit: The conventional way is to define as:

template<class T_CLASS>
CSomeClass TBase<T_CLASS>::m_objSomeClass;

Both ways would serve the purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
This works fine in Visual Studio but with the armcc compiler I again get linker errors ("undefined symbol").. I did not know ideone.com, thanks for that :) –  Mirco Jul 27 '11 at 8:54
1  
@Mirco, It should work fine. Have you checked if you are compiling/linking the file properly wherever you define the static members ? (by the way ideone is just an online compiler for small snippets to run). –  iammilind Jul 27 '11 at 9:01
    
It should be compiled and linked properly... Is there a way to define the static members implicitly? Is there something wrong with this: template<class T_CLASS> CSomeClass TBase<T_CLASS>::m_objSomeClass; ? –  Mirco Jul 27 '11 at 9:19
    
@Mirco, No there is nothing wrong with that. The only difference is that they will be instantiated only when you make an actual reference for them in your code. Otherwise it's perfectly fine. –  iammilind Jul 27 '11 at 9:28
    
This is not the standard way of defining a static member. The standard way would be the first approach that the OP shows. The semantics of this piece of code are quite different, you are defining specializations of the static member function, and this will force you to define such specialization for every instantiating type, or you will get a linker error. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 27 '11 at 10:04

And there are some sub classes which all shall have their own static member m_objSomeClass. I try to do this by templating the base class.

If all you want to achieve is separate static member, you don't need sub class, you can just instantiate from TBase and they will have separate static member, because each template class generated from a template has its own copies of any static variables or members, see the example below (the example compiles fine with VS2008 and gcc):

struct CSomeClass {
    CSomeClass(int i):m_i(i){}
    int m_i;
};

template<class T_CLASS>
class TBase
{
  protected:
    static CSomeClass m_objSomeClass;

  public:
    inline void Set(CSomeClass f_objSomeClass) { m_objSomeClass = f_objSomeClass; }
};

class CSub1
{

};

class CSub2
{
};

template<class T_CLASS>
CSomeClass TBase<T_CLASS>::m_objSomeClass = CSomeClass(0);

int main()
{
    TBase<CSub1> tb1;
    TBase<CSub2> tb2;

    //tb1 and tb2 have separate static member after instantiated from tempalte class TBase
    tb1.Set(CSomeClass(1)); //tb1::m_objSomeClass now is 1
    tb2.Set(CSomeClass(2)); //tb2::m_objSomeClass now is 2
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but in this case I really need the sub classes.. –  Mirco Jul 27 '11 at 9:16

Mirco, since you really need a subclass, I have revised my example so you have subclass and you have seperate static member function, see below(the example compiles fine with VS2008 and gcc):

struct CSomeClass {
    CSomeClass(int i):m_i(i){}
    int m_i;
};

template<class T_CLASS>
class TBase
{
  protected:
    static CSomeClass m_objSomeClass;

  public:
    inline void Set(CSomeClass f_objSomeClass) { m_objSomeClass = f_objSomeClass; }
};

class CSub1 : public TBase<CSub1>
{

};

class CSub2 : public TBase<CSub2>
{
};

template<class T_CLASS>
CSomeClass TBase<T_CLASS>::m_objSomeClass = CSomeClass(0);

int main()
{
    TBase<CSub1> tb1;
    TBase<CSub2> tb2;

    //tb1 and tb2 have separate static member after instantiated from tempalte class TBase
    tb1.Set(CSomeClass(1)); //tb1::m_objSomeClass now is 1
    tb2.Set(CSomeClass(2)); //tb2::m_objSomeClass now is 2
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.