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I'm currently learning about bitset, and in one paragraph it says this about their interactions with strings:

"The numbering conventions of strings and bitsets are inversely related: the rightmost character in the string--the one with the highest subscript--is used to initialize the low order bit in the bitset--the bit with subscript 0."

however later on they give an example + diagram which shows something like this:

string str("1111111000000011001101");
bitset<32> bitvec5(str, 5, 4); // 4 bits starting at str[5], 1100

value of str:
1 1 1 1 1 (1 1 0 0) 0 0 0 ...

value of bitvec5:
...0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (1 1 0 0)

This example shows it taking the rightmost bit and putting it so the last element from the string is the last in the bitset, not the first.

Which is right?(or are both wrong?)

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Remember that in a binary value (or any other base for that matter), the lowest order digit is on the right. –  Sander De Dycker Jul 27 '11 at 9:47
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

They are both right.

Traditionally the bits in a machine word are numbered from right to left, so the lowest bit (bit 0) is to the right, just like it is in the string.

The bitset looks like this

...1100   value
...3210   bit numbers

and the string that looks the same

"1100"

will have string[0] == '1' and string[3] == '0', the exact opposite!

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Ah I see, the lowest bit is being shown on the right, thanks. I had just assumed that when it said "lowest" it meant "left", my bad. –  user863492 Jul 27 '11 at 10:00
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string strval("1100");        //1100, so from rightmost to leftmost : 0 0 1 1
bitset<32> bitvec4(strval);   //bitvec4 is 0 0 1 1 

So whatever you are reading is correct(both text and example) :

the rightmost character in the string--the one with the highest subscript--is used to initialize the low order bit in the bitset--the bit with subscript 0.

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Will not -1 but your answer is not correct. Bo Persson provided a correct answer –  Ioan Paul Pirau Jul 27 '11 at 9:47
    
My answer is correct as that's what you see from VS debugger. Just didn't realized what's exaxtly user863492 was looking for is : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness –  Gob00st Jul 27 '11 at 10:18
    
See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Big-little_endian.png –  Gob00st Jul 27 '11 at 10:25
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