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I am trying to learn Guava. However I am not very successful in it as there are very less tutorials.

Can any body tell me how to write this code in Guava.

import java.util.*;

public class list {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List l = new ArrayList();
    for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++) {
      l.add(i);
    }
    Iterator it = l.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
      System.out.println(it.next());
    }
  }
}
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4 Answers

Guava (to the best of my knowledge) doesn't provide any functionality to simplify the code that you've posted.

The only improvements that I can suggest are to use generics, and to use the enhanced for loop to iterate over the list rather than obtaining and using the iterator explicitly:

import java.util.*;

public class list {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
  List<Integer> l = new ArrayList<Integer>();
  for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++) {
    l.add(i);
  }

  for(Integer i : l) {
    System.out.println(i);
  }

}
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As @Jared Russell pointed out, this is not exactly the best specimen to show how the improvements Guava can help you make in your code.

That said, if you're just looking for a demonstration of how Guava can find its way into this code, here's an shot:

import com.google.common.base.Joiner;
import com.google.common.collect.ImmutableList;
import com.google.common.collect.ImmutableList.Builder;

public class Question6842887 {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Builder<Integer> builder = ImmutableList.builder();
    for (int i = 1; i < 6; i++) {
        builder.add(i);
    }

    ImmutableList<Integer> list = builder.build();

    System.out.println(Joiner.on(System.getProperty("line.separator")).join(list));
}

The two Guava things I'm using here are immutable lists and joiner.

This is a probably not the type of situation you'd normally need an ImmutableList, but it's good practice to get used to using it regardless. The great advantage of immutable collections (and really any immutable object) is that they are thread-safe. You never need to make defensive copies or otherwise worry about the contents changing after passing it off. You can simply pass it around freely, or cache it, and be happy and secure about its immutability. For more information on the subject of immutability, I'd refer you to Effective Java, item 15.

The other Guava class I'm demonstrating here is Joiner. Joiner is just a nice and easy way to shove together a collection of strings with a separator. It is fairly customizable in that you can specify how it will deal with nulls as well as what separator you'd like to use. In this case, I've specified System.getProperty("line.separator") as my separator; you could instead choose to use ", " or similar. I've also chosen not to deal with nulls, since I know there are no null values in our ImmutableList. You could, however, choose an option like skipNulls or useForNull if your list could have null values.

The next release of Guava is expected to include Range support. This could be used to simplify your list building to something like ContiguousSet<Integer> list = Ranges.closedOpen(1, 6).asSet(DiscreteDomains.integers()); Though I'd not recommend it, your entire program could be one line.

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and Jared Russell...using Guava can I make iteration faster compared to usual Java Collections ...like for (Iterator itr = appCodeCombos.iterator(); itr.hasNext();) –  Codeweaver Jul 27 '11 at 13:27
    
I would not expect a performance benefit from the "enhance for loop" over against for loop with explicit iterators. I would expect (though I've not benchmarked it) that the Joiner solution would be a bit faster, since you only have one call to the notoriously slow System.out.println. –  Ray Jul 27 '11 at 13:31
    
by using Google collections will code execute faster no problem even if it runs faster in micro secs –  Codeweaver Jul 28 '11 at 12:51
1  
@Enosh, it's really going to depend on how you're using it. For the most part, Guava is using JDK collections behind the scenes. On the other hand, they are using them in a smarter way that the user might otherwise, e.g., the lazy transform and filter methods. That said, I use Guava much more for defect reduction and expressiveness than for performance. –  Ray Jul 28 '11 at 13:51
    
thanks that's a very valuable information. I guess then if I use Guava my code will execute with the same speed as it is at present or may be even slower. I need to increase my codes performance. –  Codeweaver Jul 28 '11 at 14:42
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The upcoming version 10 of Guava will make this kind of initialization much less painful:

List<Integer> l = Lists.newArrayList(
        Ranges.closed(1, 5).asSet(DiscreteDomains.integers())
);
for (Integer item : l) {
    System.out.println(item);
}

(There is no release 10 yet, but you can download the sources and build it yourself)

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This just looks wrong - I hope real world will convince guava committers to forget about domains. The approach seems sillier than replacing operators with Function equivalents... –  Gabriel Ščerbák Jul 31 '11 at 1:52
    
@Gabriel I disagree, this is one of the features I am absolutely looking forward to. Yes, I'd prefer Ranges without DiscreteDomains, but I have to agree they would be much more ambiguous and much less universally useful. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 31 '11 at 1:56
    
Don't get me wrong, I am looking forward to Ranges as well, but I think the 20% of use cases for them used 80% of time require no domains. –  Gabriel Ščerbák Jul 31 '11 at 2:03
    
@Sean, I had mentioned the new Range / Ranges functionality in my post. Though again, there are much stronger use cases than just looping from 1 to 5... –  Ray Aug 2 '11 at 0:13
1  
@KonradMorawski ContiguousSet.create(Range, DiscreteDomain) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 9 '13 at 8:28
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In this specific case there is no need to use list - as @Sean Patrick Floyd shows by using ranges - the collection you are iterating over is a set of numbers -so list isn't really the best type to use.

Using guava has strengthened my resolve to "program to the most generic type" - and I find myself increasingly programming to Iterable - where before, for some reason I would just consider Collection to be the most abstract type in these kinds of use cases.

Guava's Iterables class is incredibly useful for dealing with Iterable types and I think it does lead to a lot nicer code.

Using the my current version of guava (12.0) - a clean way to write that would be:

 Iterable<Integer> l = Ranges.closed(1, 5).asSet(DiscreteDomains.integers());
 for (Integer item : l) {
    System.out.println(item);
 }

EDIT

There is a good blog post here from one the creator of Fest Assertions about why not to program to Iterable (The death of Kittens... etc..). I'm still not thoroughly convinced about the evilness of it in all circumstances but I can concede that in some cases it's pretty harsh for people consuming your code - especially in the case of API design.

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1  
In more recent vesions to avoid deprecation errors it should be ContiguousSet.create(Range.closedOpen(1, 6), DiscreteDomains.integers()) (I almost always prefer closedOpen ranges) –  Petr Gladkikh Jun 17 '13 at 7:23
    
And by the way I think that the idea of post is wrong. (<- that's period) It is really bad idea to add complexity in the name of convenience (see some talks by Rich Hickey about simplicity). –  Petr Gladkikh Jun 17 '13 at 7:28
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