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I have a 640*480 vector which contains a set of numbers, I wish to find the min and max number of each row of the vector.

for(int i = 0; i < R; i++)
    {
        Begin = m_valBuffer.begin()  + (i*C);
        End = Begin+C;

        rMinmax= minmax_element(Begin, End);
     }

However this is extremely slow, is there any way I could speed this up?

  • The current load on the GPU when running this is only 34% so there must be a way to improve this?
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So you are wanting to do 640 reductions, each on only 480 elements, on the same pitched linear memory? –  talonmies Jul 27 '11 at 11:09
    
I want to do a minmax_element on 640 elements, 480 times. the loop above shifts the begin and end 640 elements each iteration. –  Sharpie Jul 27 '11 at 11:22
1  
This whole operation could be done in a single call of an only slightly modified version of the basic NVIDIA SDK shared memory reduction kernel. Do you absolutely have to do this with thrust? –  talonmies Jul 27 '11 at 12:02
    
If you are open to commercial software: wiki.accelereyes.com/wiki/libjacket/group__minmax.htm Before anyone accuses me of anything, yes I work there. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Jul 28 '11 at 1:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This example shows how to compute the sum of each row using the reduce_by_key algorithm. You can easily adapt that example to compute the min or max of each row. To compute the min and max of each row simultaneously you'll need to use this strategy. Specifically, you'll need to use a transform_iterator on the input data and convert each value x into a tuple (x,x) before applying the minmax_binary_op reduction operator.

Here's a complete example:

#include <thrust/host_vector.h>
#include <thrust/device_vector.h>
#include <thrust/generate.h>
#include <thrust/transform_reduce.h>
#include <thrust/functional.h>
#include <thrust/extrema.h>
#include <thrust/random.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

// minmax_pair stores the minimum and maximum 
// values that have been encountered so far
template <typename T>
struct minmax_pair
{
  T min_val;
  T max_val;
};

// minmax_unary_op is a functor that takes in a value x and
// returns a minmax_pair whose minimum and maximum values
// are initialized to x.
template <typename T>
struct minmax_unary_op
  : public thrust::unary_function< T, minmax_pair<T> >
{
  __host__ __device__
  minmax_pair<T> operator()(const T& x) const
  {
    minmax_pair<T> result;
    result.min_val = x;
    result.max_val = x;
    return result;
  }
};

// minmax_binary_op is a functor that accepts two minmax_pair 
// structs and returns a new minmax_pair whose minimum and 
// maximum values are the min() and max() respectively of 
// the minimums and maximums of the input pairs
template <typename T>
struct minmax_binary_op
  : public thrust::binary_function< minmax_pair<T>,
                                    minmax_pair<T>,
                                    minmax_pair<T> >
{
  __host__ __device__
  minmax_pair<T> operator()(const minmax_pair<T>& x, const minmax_pair<T>& y) const 
  {
    minmax_pair<T> result;
    result.min_val = thrust::min(x.min_val, y.min_val);
    result.max_val = thrust::max(x.max_val, y.max_val);
    return result;
  }
};

// convert a linear index to a row index
template <typename T>
struct linear_index_to_row_index : public thrust::unary_function<T,T>
{
    T C; // number of columns

    __host__ __device__
    linear_index_to_row_index(T C) : C(C) {}

    __host__ __device__
    T operator()(T i)
    {
        return i / C;
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    int R = 5;     // number of rows
    int C = 8;     // number of columns
    thrust::default_random_engine rng;
    thrust::uniform_int_distribution<int> dist(0, 99);

    // initialize data
    thrust::device_vector<int> array(R * C);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < array.size(); i++)
        array[i] = dist(rng);

    // allocate storage for per-row results and indices
    thrust::device_vector< minmax_pair<int> > row_results(R);
    thrust::device_vector< int              > row_indices(R);

    // compute row sums by summing values with equal row indices
    thrust::reduce_by_key
      (thrust::make_transform_iterator(thrust::counting_iterator<int>(0), linear_index_to_row_index<int>(C)),
       thrust::make_transform_iterator(thrust::counting_iterator<int>(0), linear_index_to_row_index<int>(C)) + (R*C),
       thrust::make_transform_iterator(array.begin(), minmax_unary_op<int>()),
       row_indices.begin(),
       row_results.begin(),
       thrust::equal_to<int>(),
       minmax_binary_op<int>());

    // print data 
    for(int i = 0; i < R; i++)
    {
      minmax_pair<int> result = row_results[i];
        std::cout << "[";
        for(int j = 0; j < C; j++)
            std::cout << std::setw(3) << array[i * C + j] << " ";
        std::cout << "] = " << "(" << result.min_val << "," << result.max_val << ")\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

Sample output:

[  0   8  60  89  96  18  51  39 ] = (0,96)
[ 26  74   8  56  58  80  59  51 ] = (8,80)
[ 87  99  72  96  29  42  89  65 ] = (29,99)
[ 90  96  16  85  90  29  93  41 ] = (16,96)
[ 30  51  39  78  68  54  59   9 ] = (9,78)
share|improve this answer
    
It's not quite clear to me how you do each row independently, but simultaneously, using that approach. Can you provide more detail? –  harrism Jul 28 '11 at 2:21
    
I added some code to show what I had in mind. All I did was take the sum_rows example and changed the values argument (i.e. array.begin()) to a transform_iterator that expands x into a minmax_pair (essentially, a tuple). –  wnbell Jul 28 '11 at 15:45

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