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I'm stuck on a small but tricky problem since yesterday.

What I have is a (possibly infinitely) nested list like this:

[1,[2,[3,4]]] 
or [[1,2],[3,4]] and so on.

On each level the lists consist of two sublists, (I didn't use tuples because the lists will probably get arbitrary length in the next step) Now I want to insert an element in every possible position in this list and return an list of lists of all possible insertion positions. So if I insert 5, my output should look like:

[ [5,[1,[2,[3,4]]]],
[1,[5,[2,[3,4]]]],
[1,[2,[5,[3,4]]]],
[1,[2,[[3,5],4]]],
[1,[2,[3,[4,5]]]] ]

The background: I'm trying to construct an phylogenetic tree by adding one taxon at a time. Each taxon has to be inserted at the position where it fits best.

What I got now is:

def get_trees(nwklist,newid):
    if not isinstance(nwklist,list):
        return [newid,nwklist]
    else:
        return [newid,nwklist],[get_trees(nwklist[0],newid),nwklist[1]],[nwklist[0],get_trees(nwklist[1],newid)]

which does not produce the output I want, but comes somewhat close.

([5, [1, [2, [3, 4]]]], 
[[5, 1], [2, [3, 4]]], 
[1, ([5, [2, [3, 4]]], [[5, 2], [3, 4]], [2, ([5, [3, 4]], [[5, 3], 4], [3, [5, 4]])])])

There should be an easy solution, perhaps involving lambda functions, but I just don't see it.

Christoph

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6  
You're almost certainly reinventing the wheel. There are packages for handling phylogenetic trees in Python, like Biopython's Phylo (biopython.org/wiki/Phylo) or dendropy (pypi.python.org/pypi/DendroPy) –  Thomas K Jul 27 '11 at 12:27
    
Just nitpicking: your list may have arbitrary depth, but not infinite depth. At least, I don't know how it could. –  Eric Wilson Jul 27 '11 at 12:50
    
"Each taxon has to be inserted at the position where it fits best." This sounds like trying to construct a neighbour-joining tree, which is a bad plan. Look up some more literature on how to best constuct phylogentic trees and why the easiest way is also the worst. –  pyvi Aug 2 '11 at 8:13
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd use a generator:

def gen_trees(nwklist, newid):
  yield [newid] + [nwklist]
  if isinstance(nwklist, list):
    for i in xrange(len(nwklist)):
      for l in gen_trees(nwklist[i], newid):
        yield nwklist[:i] + [l] + nwklist[i+1:]
  yield [nwklist] + [newid]

for l in gen_trees([1,[2,[3,4]]] , 5):
  print l

Please note that this returns more trees than listed in your example:

[5, [1, [2, [3, 4]]]]
[[5, 1], [2, [3, 4]]]
[[1, 5], [2, [3, 4]]]
[1, [5, [2, [3, 4]]]]
[1, [[5, 2], [3, 4]]]
[1, [[2, 5], [3, 4]]]
[1, [2, [5, [3, 4]]]]
[1, [2, [[5, 3], 4]]]
[1, [2, [[3, 5], 4]]]
[1, [2, [3, [5, 4]]]]
[1, [2, [3, [4, 5]]]]
[1, [2, [[3, 4], 5]]]
[1, [[2, [3, 4]], 5]]
[[1, [2, [3, 4]]], 5]

As far as I can see, this ahderes to the stated requirements. If there are some unstated requirements that I didn't quite get (e.g. if the first element of every sublist has to be a scalar), please clarify and I'll update the solution.

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Thanks! That looks very good. It's more then I listed, I forgot to mention that the order is unimportant, so [1, [[5, 2], [3, 4]]] [1, [[2, 5], [3, 4]]] are basically the same tree. –  Christoph Jul 27 '11 at 13:21
    
And if I remove the second yield [nwklist] + [newid] line, I get exactly what I wanted. Thanks very much! –  Christoph Jul 27 '11 at 13:26
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