Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is an elegant algorithm to mix the elements in two arrays (of potentially differing sizes) so that the items are drawn in an alternating fashion from each array, with the leftovers added to the end?

E.g.

Array 1 - A, B, C, D, E, F, G

Array 2 - 1, 2, 3, 4

Mixed array - A, 1, B, 2, C, 3, D, 4, E, F, G

I would prefer the solution in C#, but I should be able to read and transpose solutions in any language (or even some form of pseudo code).

Don't worry about null checking or any other edge cases, I'll handle those.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You mean something along the lines of this?

// naive/boring approach
int i = 0;
int m = 0;
while (i < a1.size() || i < a2.size()) {
    if (i < a1.size())
        mixed[m++] = a1[i];
    if (i < a2.size())
        mixed[m++] = a2[i];
    i++;
}

If you use this, you'll probably want to store the array lengths in variables so you don't have to keep calling a size() method (or whatever it is in whatever language you use).

share|improve this answer
    
The "naive/boring" approach is exactly the starting point I needed. I filled in the other subtleties for my specific implementation. –  Brian Hinchey Mar 30 '09 at 10:04
add comment

There is a function that does this exactly in the python docs, which works with n arrays

from itertools import *

def roundrobin(*iterables):
    "roundrobin('ABC', 'D', 'EF') --> A D E B F C"
    # Recipe credited to George Sakkis
    pending = len(iterables)
    nexts = cycle(iter(it).next for it in iterables)
    while pending:
        try:
            for next in nexts:
                yield next()
        except StopIteration:
            pending -= 1
            nexts = cycle(islice(nexts, pending))

I came up with another one that will keep repeating through the shorter arrays if they run out sooner:

from itertools import *    

def repeatrobin(*iterables):
    cycles = cycle(map(cycle, iterables))
    stop = iter(xrange(max(map(len, iterables)) * len(iterables) - 1))
    for c in cycles:
       yield c.next()
       stop.next()

>>> list(repeatrobin(('A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G'), (1, 2, 3, 4)))
['A', 1, 'B', 2, 'C', 3, 'D', 4, 'E', 1, 'F', 2, 'G', 3]
>>> list(repeatrobin(('A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'), (1, 2, 3), ('*',)))
['A', 1, '*', 'B', 2, '*', 'C', 3, '*', 'D', 1, '*', 'E', 2, '*']
share|improve this answer
    
wow, i'll keep this in mind, but way more than I need in this case :) –  Brian Hinchey Mar 26 '09 at 4:53
    
the cool thing about python is how easy it is to write something like this in so few lines of code –  ʞɔıu Mar 26 '09 at 15:23
add comment

I'm just dabbling in C#, and as I'm currently learning about IEnumerable, I thought I'd try to solve this problem with an iterator.

The TwoListMerger takes two lists as parameters. While there is some values in either list to process, it alternates between each list yield-returning a value. When one or other list is exhausted, the iterator does not alternate, finishing efficiently the remaining list's values.

	public static IEnumerable TwoListMerger( List<object> List1, List<object> List2 )
	{
		// Intialise two indices for the two lists
		int ListIndex1 = 0;
		int ListIndex2 = 0;

		// Begin zipper - List1 will provide the first value, then List2, etc.
		bool YieldFromList1 = true;

		// While values in either list remain...
		while ( ( ListIndex1 < List1.Count ) ||
				( ListIndex2 < List2.Count ) )		
		{
			// If next value comes from List1...
			if ( YieldFromList1 )
			{
				// Yield from List1 if List2 exhausted( otherwise from List2 )
				YieldFromList1 = ( ListIndex2 >= List2.Count );
				yield return List1[ ListIndex1++ ];
			}
			// Next value comes from List2...
			else
			{
				// Yield from List1 if List1 not exhausted (otherwise from List2)
				YieldFromList1 = ( ListIndex1 < List1.Count );
				yield return List2[ ListIndex2++ ];
			}
		}

		// End iterator
		yield break;
	}


// Example usage (List1 and List2 are lists of integers)
List<object> MergedList = new List<object>( );
foreach ( object o in TwoListMerger( List1, List2 ) )
{
	MergedList.Add( o );
}

foreach ( object o in MergedList )
{
	Console.Write( "{0} ", o.ToString() );
}
Console.WriteLine( "}" );
share|improve this answer
    
I like it. Nice use of the yield operation. –  Brian Hinchey Apr 6 '09 at 10:03
add comment

Function for PHP (only working with indexed Arrays):

function array_merge_alternating(&$array1, &$array2)
{
    $result = array();

    $count1 = count($array1);
    $count2 = count($array2);

    $i = 0;
    while (($i < $count1) || ($i < $count2))
    {
        if($i < $count1)
            array_push($result, $array1[$i]);
        if($i < $count2)
            array_push($result, $array2[$i]);

        $i++;
    }

    return $result;
}

Thanks to Ryan Graham!

share|improve this answer
add comment

I see a O(N), N = size of larger set, algorithm since you have to iterate over all entries.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm really having fun with IEnumerator now!

	public static IEnumerable TwoListMerger( List<object> List1, List<object> List2 )
	{
		IEnumerator e1 = List1.GetEnumerator( );
		IEnumerator e2 = List2.GetEnumerator( );

		// Declare here (scope of while test)
		bool b1 = true;
		bool b2 = true;

		// While values remain in either list
		while ( b1 || b2 )
		{
			// NB assignments in "if"s return bool

			// If we have a value remaining in List1, yield return it
			if ( b1 && ( b1 = e1.MoveNext( ) ) )
				yield return e1.Current;

			// If we have a value remaining List2, yield return it
			if ( b2 && ( b2 = e2.MoveNext( ) ) )
				yield return e2.Current;			}

		// Done
		yield break;
	}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.