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I feel that I should start using the factory method design pattern on some of my code. Here is what I am doing;

The below code is my generator class for Accom namespace:

namespace Accom {

    public class Generator {

      int? _id;
      string _name;

      public Generator(int? id = null, string name = null) {
          _id = id;
          _name = name;
      }

      public string GetBaseUrl() { 

          //some logic sits here.

          return somestring;

      }

      //Can have some other methods as well

    }

}

I will have the same start-up for Traf namespace as well:

namespace Traf {
    public class Generator {
      int? _id;
      string _name;

      public Generator(int? id = null, string name = null) {
          _id = id;
          _name = name;
      }

      public string GetBaseUrl() { 
          //some logic sits here. Same one with the Accom.

          return somestring;
      }

      //Can have some other methods as well
    }
}

So, this will repeat again and again.

I tried to create some factory pattern for that but all of the abstract classes were mixed and I confused a lot (I think it is because this is first time I am trying to do something like that).

Can anyone help me on this and point me to good source code that I can read and get a sense from?

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1  
Could you please explain why you are using namespacing so that you can have two classes with the same name. This doesn't feel "right". –  Tim Lloyd Jul 27 '11 at 13:38
    
@chibacity I am trying to separate the logic there. All of the classes siting on different namespace will have different methods. –  tugberk Jul 27 '11 at 14:01
1  
Namespaces would not normally be used to achieve this sort of separation. If all your classes should have the same "interface" e.g. support a GetBaseUrl method, but have different ways of achieving this, then you would usually use inheritance to achieve this if they have some common code, or have an interface that all your classes support. These are quite fundamental design consideration and deserve more questioning and explanation than I can give here in a comment. –  Tim Lloyd Jul 27 '11 at 14:18

3 Answers 3

I think this code project article on the AbstractFactoryPattern does a pretty good job of providing a useful example.

However, unless you have a really good reason to, you should not create the same class in several different namespaces. You can always use using Accom; to access your Generator class from the Traf namespace.


Edit in response to comment that each Generator in a different namespace will have a different set of methods.

You can't use the abstract factory pattern if the implementations will have different methods. The idea of the abstract factory pattern is to create a common interface that all objects returned by the factory will implement, then use some context in the factory to choose the correct implementation for a given situation.

The advantage you gain by using a factory is called Inversion of Control. Basically, your client code does not depend on a particular implementation of the Generator class (by having a variable of that type, or by calling a constructor for it).

However, if you need to access methods that are specific to an implementation, then you can't access them through a common interface, which means you don't gain the Inversion of Control benefit, which means there is no real reason to use the abstract factory pattern.

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  • Create an abstract class for generator
  • create child class for different types of generator
  • Make a factory class
  • Make factory as singleton
  • Create one method (Common) which will take parameter as string (with namespace if classes are in different namespace )
  • Use reflection to create instance of different object in method common
  • return base type from common
  • Create different methods (A,B,C) for get different instance, call method (Common)
  • cast the result from common to type u want to return

EDIT

public abstract class Generator
{
    public Generator(int? i, string name) { }
    public abstract string GetBaseUrl();
}

public class GeneratorA : Generator
{
    public GeneratorA(int? i, string name) : base(i, name) { }
}
public class GeneratorB : Generator
{
    public GeneratorB(int? i, string name) : base(i, name) { }
}
public class GeneratorFactory
{
    // Make singleton
    public GeneratorB GenerateB(int? i, string name)
    {
        return (GeneratorB)this.Generate(i, name, "GeneratorB");
    }

    public GeneratorA GenerateA(int? i, string name)
    {
        return (GeneratorA)this.Generate(i, name, "GeneratorA");
    }

    public Generator Generate(int? i, string name, string genType)
    {
        return new GeneratorA(); // use reflection to generate child generator based on string "genType"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Rather than doing a Singleton factory, consider using an IoC Container. This is effectively a super-factory. –  TrueWill Jul 27 '11 at 13:54
    
@hungryMind some code would be great. some of the part is still not clear to me (no offense, it is related to me.) –  tugberk Jul 27 '11 at 14:03
    
reference code added –  hungryMind Jul 27 '11 at 14:20

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