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I want to do something like this: select * from table order by id asc with the exception that if the id is 5 (for example) make it be top, basically 5 then all other IDs ordered asc.

How can I do this please?

Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT *, CASE WHEN id = 5 THEN -1 ELSE id END AS ordering 
FROM table 
ORDER BY ordering ASC
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Thank you, devin. –  Francisc Jul 27 '11 at 14:47
    
Your welcome! I prefer this type of solution because it is a single query, so with a proper index, it can perform quite well –  devin Aug 2 '11 at 3:17

You can also use function FIELD():

SELECT *
FROM table
ORDER BY FIELD(id, 5) DESC
       , id ASC

Especially useful if you want to have first the rows with say, id = 5, 23, 17, you can use:

SELECT *
FROM table
ORDER BY FIELD(id, 17, 23, 5) DESC
       , id ASC
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Hmm, that's very nice, thanks. –  Francisc Jul 27 '11 at 15:57

You can use UNION as initally suggested by me, with a sorting on both columns as suggested by @Mike in the comments.

(SELECT *, 1 single_id FROM table_name WHERE id = 5)
UNION ALL
(SELECT *, 2 all_ids FROM table_name WHERE id <> 5)
ORDER BY single_id, id

Or better off with an IF statement, to avoid the overhead of two sorts:

  SELECT *, IF(id = 5, -1, id) ordering 
    FROM table_name
ORDER BY ordering ASC
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have you tested this? i don't think the sql spec specifies that this will return each unioned set in its own order in the sequence that you unioned them in... –  Randy Jul 27 '11 at 14:33
2  
brackets are needed, because this will sort all the union –  Karolis Jul 27 '11 at 14:33
1  
-1 union does not guarantee order –  Adrian Carneiro Jul 27 '11 at 14:37
1  
@Shef: ...but then the IF statement suffers from the same problem - the ordering column is not indexed either. –  Mike Jul 27 '11 at 14:59
1  
No, because you'll have a row with id=5, single_id=1 and one with a id=5, single_id=2. Plus you can use UNION ALL which doesn't lose any time selecting distinct rows. –  ypercube Jul 27 '11 at 15:25
SELECT * FROM table_name ORDER BY id=7 DESC, id ASC

Since this doesn't use indexes, I don't recommend using it on large tables.

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