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I want to use jackson json library for a generic method as follows:

public MyRequest<T> tester(){
  TypeReference<MyWrapper<T>> typeRef = new TypeReference<MyWrapper<T>>();  
  MyWrapper<T> requestWrapper = (MyWrapper<T>) JsonConverter.fromJson(jsonRequest, typeRef);
  return requestWrapper.getRequest();
}
public class MyWrapper<T> {

    private MyRequest<T> request;

    public MyRequest<T> getRequest() {
        return request;
    }

    public void setRequest(MyRequest<T> request) {
        this.request = request;
    }
}


 public class MyRequest{
     private List<T> myobjects;

     public void setMyObjects(List<T> ets) {
         this.myobjects = ets;
     }

     @NotNull
     @JsonIgnore
     public T getMyObject() {
         return myobjects.get(0);
     }
}

Now the problem is that when I call getMyObject() which is inside the request object jackson returns the nested custom object as a LinkedHashMap. Is there any way in which I specify that T object needs to be returned?. For example: if I sent object of type Customer then Customer should be returned from that List?.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Please add the implementation of getT() –  Jim Garrison Jul 27 '11 at 14:47
    
This question is similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/6062011/… but they have suggested specifying type using TypeFactory. However I do not know the type at compile time... –  techzen Jul 27 '11 at 15:01
    
TypeFactory has methods that do not need static class; createCollectionType and so on. –  StaxMan Jul 27 '11 at 22:48
    
Please share complete code. I am also facing same problem. –  AZ_ Oct 9 '13 at 3:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted

This is a well-known problem with Java type erasure: T is just a type variable, and you must indicate actual class, usually as Class argument. Without such information, best that can be done is to use bounds; and plain T is roughly same as 'T extends Object'. And Jackson will then bind JSON Objects as Maps.

In this case, tester method needs to have access to Class, and you can construct

JavaType type = mapper.getTypeFactory().
  constructCollectionType(List.class, Foo.class)

and then

List<Foo> list = mapper.readValue(new File("input.json"), type);
share|improve this answer
6  
It works : I did the following: JavaType topMost = mapper.getTypeFactory().constructParametricType(MyWrapper.class, ActualClassRuntime.class); and then did the readValue and it finally worked :) –  techzen Jul 28 '11 at 3:04
    
Yes, that does work -- thanks for pointing out the method for creating generic type other than Map/Collection type! –  StaxMan Jul 28 '11 at 15:47
    
Exactly what I needed, thanks!! –  gresdiplitude Jun 20 '12 at 6:50
    
@StaxMan would it better to use ClassMate for these kind of things from now? –  husayt Jan 25 at 13:50
1  
@husayt yes, technically java-classmate lib is superior. But integrating it with Jackson is bit tricky just because Jackson's own type abstraction is integrated part of API. For long term it'd be great to figure out proper way to make Jackson use classmate code, either embedded or via dep. –  StaxMan Jan 27 at 23:06

'JavaType' works !! I was trying to unmarshall (deserialize) a List in json String to ArrayList java Objects and was struggling to find a solution since days.
Below is the code that finally gave me solution. Code:

JsonMarshallerUnmarshaller<T>{

     T targetClass ;

     public ArrayList<T> unmarshal(String jsonString)
     {
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

        AnnotationIntrospector introspector = new JacksonAnnotationIntrospector();

        mapper.getDeserializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);

        mapper.getSerializationConfig().withAnnotationIntrospector(introspector);
        JavaType type = mapper.getTypeFactory().
                    constructCollectionType(ArrayList.class, targetclass.getClass()) ;
        try
        {
        Class c1 = this.targetclass.getClass() ;
        Class c2 = this.targetclass1.getClass() ;
            ArrayList<T> temp = (ArrayList<T>) mapper.readValue(jsonString,  type);
        return temp ;
        }
       catch (JsonParseException e)
       {
        e.printStackTrace();
       }
       catch (JsonMappingException e) {
           e.printStackTrace();
       } catch (IOException e) {
          e.printStackTrace();
       }

     return null ;
    }  

}
share|improve this answer
    
How to initialize TargetClass ? –  AZ_ Oct 9 '13 at 3:23
    
Via constructor or getter setter!!! –  rushidesai1 Oct 10 '13 at 6:07
    
Please show me a small example. I am passing Class<?> target and then getting target.getClassName(). –  AZ_ Oct 10 '13 at 8:08
1  
Add a constructor as follows : JsonMarshallerUnmarshaller<T>{ private Class<T> targetClass ; JsonMarshallerUnmarshaller(Class<T> c){ targetClass = c ; } } Make appropriate changes now to the 'unmarshal' function to use this class instead of doing getClass everywhere. –  rushidesai1 Oct 11 '13 at 19:02

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