Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a JavaScript object like the following

 var p =
    {
        "p1": "value1",
        "p2": "value2",
        "p3": "value3"
    };

Now I want to loop through all p elements (p1,p2,p3...) and get their key and values. How can I do that? I can modify the JavaScript object if necessary . My ultimate goal is to loop through some key value pairs. And if possible I want to avoid using eval.

share|improve this question
1  
I changed JSON to JavaScript (object) to avoid confusing of object literals and JSON. –  Felix Kling Mar 29 '12 at 16:48
    

12 Answers 12

up vote 864 down vote accepted

You can use the for-in loop as shown by others. However, you also want to make sure that the key you get is an actual property of an object, and doesn't come from the prototype:

for (var key in p) {
  if (p.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    alert(key + " -> " + p[key]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
170  
+1 for using hasOwnProperty –  Andreas Grech Apr 7 '09 at 13:42
7  
Would propose that you change the alert line just for clarity to alert(key + " -> " + JSON.stringify(p[key])); –  Steve Midgley Aug 18 '11 at 22:03
5  
Can you explain the need for hasOwnProperty? What you mean by prototype? –  kamaci Aug 22 '11 at 12:46
64  
In javascript, every object has a bunch of built-in key-value pairs that have meta-information. When you loop through all the key-value pairs for an object you're looping through them too. hasOwnPropery() filters these out. –  danieltalsky Jan 27 '12 at 15:56
3  
Actually, For...in is not deprecated. For each...in is. But I really like the term archaeologists...I'm going to have to start using that. –  Ben Y Feb 27 at 16:08

You have to use the for-in loop

But be very careful when using this kind of loop, because this will loop all the properties along the prototype chain.

Therefore, when using for-in loops, always make use of the hasOwnProperty method to determine if the current property in iteration is really a property of the object you're checking on:

for (prop in p) {
    if (!p.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        //The current property is not a direct property of p
        continue;
    }
    //Do your logic with the property here
}
share|improve this answer
15  
This is better than levik's solution because it allows the main logic to be only one nested loop in rather than two; making for easier to read code. Although I'd loose the the brackets around the continue; they are superfluous. –  SystemicPlural Apr 6 '11 at 9:55
15  
I would not remove the { } personally because an if without them makes it a little unclear what is part of the if and what is not. But I guess that's just a matter of opinion :) –  pimvdb Aug 5 '11 at 12:01
12  
Yes, I prefer keeping the { } mainly to avoid confusion if one later on needs to add something to the if scope. –  Andreas Grech Aug 5 '11 at 12:21
3  
Reading my previous comment, I realized that I didn't use the correct terms, because I said "if scope"; but keep in mind that JavaScript only has function scope. So what I actually meant was "if block". –  Andreas Grech Nov 11 '11 at 11:08
2  
I agree with the other commenters. This is the best solution. –  Andrew May 17 '12 at 21:43

If you work with jQuery, you may use jQuery.each() method. It can be used to seamlessly iterate over both objects and arrays:

$.each(obj, function(key, value) {
    console.log(key, value);
});
share|improve this answer
2  
To get to the value: $.each(obj, function (key, value) { console.log(value.title); }); –  David K Egghead Jun 8 '13 at 14:41
    
having as a reference the above code...how I am going to get the value of a specific property?I do not want to loop through all of them but only a specific which in my case has the name "title". –  Dimitris Papageorgiou Apr 24 at 17:14
    
@DimitrisPapageorgiou As simple as obj.title. –  VisioN Apr 24 at 17:23
    
@VisioN the code you gave does not work...here is the fiddle jsfiddle.net/fiddlehunt/m7GSX/3 –  Dimitris Papageorgiou Apr 24 at 18:34
    
@DimitrisPapageorgiou Are you serious? jsfiddle.net/m7GSX/6. –  VisioN Apr 24 at 21:19

Under ECMAScript 5, you can combine Object.keys() and Array.prototype.forEach():

    var obj = { first: "John", last: "Doe" };
    // Visit non-inherited enumerable keys
    Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key) {
        console.log(key);
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Why didn't the standard provide Object.forEach(obj, function (value, key) {...})? :( Certainly obj.forEach(function...) would be shorter and complement Array.prototype.forEach, but that would risk having objects define their own forEach property. I suppose Object.keys guards against the callback modifying the object's keys. –  David Harkness Jun 23 at 20:36
    
Object.forEach = function (obj, callback) { Object.keys(obj).forEach(function (key) { callback(obj[key], key); }); } –  David Harkness Jun 23 at 20:41

You can just iterate over it like:

for (var key in p) {
  alert(p[key]);
}

Note that key will not take on the value of the property, it's just an index value.

share|improve this answer

via prototype with forEach() which should skip the prototype chain properties:

Object.prototype.each = function(f) {
    var obj = this
    Object.keys(obj).forEach( function(key) { 
        f( key , obj[key] ) 
    });
}


//print all keys and values
var obj = {a:1,b:2,c:3}
obj.each(function(key,value) { console.log(key + " " + value) });
// a 1
// b 2
// c 3
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful with the prototype: obj = { print: 1, each: 2, word: 3 } produces TypeError: number is not a function. Using forEach to match the similar Array function may reduce the risk somewhat. –  David Harkness Jun 23 at 21:40

In ECMAScript 5 you have new approach in iteration fields of literal - Object.keys

More information you can see on MDN

My choice is below as a faster solution in current versions of browsers (Chrome30, IE10, FF25)

var keys = Object.keys(p),
    len = keys.length,
    i = 0,
    prop,
    value;
while (i < len) {
    prop = keys[i];
    value = p[prop];
    i += 1;
}

You can compare performance of this approach with different implementations on jsperf.com:

Browser support you can see on Kangax's compat table

For old browser you have simple and full polyfill

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I just wanted to post this method. But you beat me to it :( –  Jamie Hutber Mar 20 at 23:05
var p =
    {
        "p1": "value1",
        "p2": "value2",
        "p3": "value3"
    };

for (var key in p) 
{
    if (p.hasOwnProperty(key))
    {
    alert(key + " = " + p[key]);
    }
}
---------------------------
---------------------------
Output:
p1 = values1
p2 = values2
p3 = values3
share|improve this answer

After looking through all the answers in here, hasOwnProperty isn't required for my own usage because my json object is clean; there's really no sense in adding any additional javascript processing. This is all I'm using:

for (var key in p) {
    console.log(key + ' => ' + p[key]);
    // key is key
    // value is p[key]
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Whether the JSON object is clean or not is irrelevant. If at any other time some code sets a property on Object.prototype, then it will be enumerated by for..in. If you are sure you are not using any libraries that do that, then you don't need to call hasOwnProperty. –  G-Wiz Jan 13 '12 at 20:15

I have put together a little JSON sample that iterates over a JavaScript object and posts the property values to a cross domain server that is hosts an DotNet.aspx page that then converts a C# object to a JSON string that is then posted back to the browser and converted back to a JavaScript object without having to use Window.Eval()

The resultant JavaScript object is then finally past back to a call-back function that is ready to uses and the code does not need 3rd party libraries, works in net framework 2.0 and upwards and has been tested with IE6-IE9, Firefox plus it's lightweight.

Click my name or see http://www.flashinvader.com/developers_corner/simple_json_objects_using_javascript_and_aspx.html for full details

share|improve this answer
for(key in p) {
  alert( p[key] );
}

Note: you can do this over arrays, but you'll iterate over the length and other properties, too.

share|improve this answer
3  
When using a for loop like that, key will just take on an index value, so that will just alert 0, 1, 2, etc... You need to access p[key]. –  Bryan Mar 26 '09 at 6:07
    
It is the slowest method of array iteration in JavaScript. You can check this on your computer - Best way to iterate over Arrays in JavaScript –  Pencroff Dec 5 '13 at 12:15
1  
@Pencroff: the problem is that the question is not about looping through arrays... ;) –  Sk8erPeter Jan 1 at 0:55
    
This is something I don't understand on stackoverflow. Richard gave the correct answer, and he was the first one giving that answer, but he did not get any +1? @Bryan var p = {"p1":"q","p2":"w"}; for(key in p) { alert( key ); } is popping "p1" and "p2" in alerts, so whats wrong about that??? –  Sebastian Aug 5 at 6:43
    
I think the main difference is the quality: the other answers not only tell how, but also tell the caveats (e.g., the prototype) and how to deal with those caveats. IMHO, those other answers are better than mine :). –  Richard Levasseur Aug 6 at 16:41

Besause the asker's ultimate goal is to loop through some key value pairs and finally don't looking for a loop.

var p ={"p1":"value1","p2":"value2","p3":"value3"};
if('p1' in p){
  var val=p['p1'];
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
No! He wrote "Now I want to loop through all p elements" so he realy need a loop like in his accepted answer. –  Sebastian Aug 5 at 6:40
    
@Sebastian I thought he knows which values he like to ask for. –  B.F. Aug 6 at 6:43

protected by VisioN Feb 27 '13 at 8:52

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.