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The System.DateTime object has methods to AddYears(), AddMonths(), AddDays(), AddSeconds(), etc.

I've noticed that there is no AddWeeks(). Why is this?

Also, my requirement is to get a price value from 52 weeks ago. I know this equates to 1 year, but they were specific about 52 weeks.

Would it be the same for me to do:

yearOldPrice = _priceService.GetPriceForDate(price.Date.AddYears(-1));

as

yearOldPrice = _priceService.GetPriceForDate(price.Date.AddDays(-7 * 52));

I ask on the presumption that .AddDays(-7 * 52) is the same as .AddWeeks(-52), 'cause there's 7 days in a week.

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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As you've noted in your question, unlike Years and Months, there are always exactly 7 days per week (on my calendar, anyway), so there's very little to be gained by having an AddWeeks method when all you need to do is .AddDays(weeks * 7). Though you have to question the logic when they have AddMinutes and AddHours! Damn them and their inconsistencies!

You could always create an extension method for .AddWeeks if it really bothers you, though:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime AddWeeks(this DateTime dateTime, int numberOfWeeks)
    {
        return dateTime.AddDays(numberOfWeeks * 7);
    }
}

And as others have pointed out, a year is not 52 weeks.

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1  
That looks suspiciously like mine! (edited in afterwards) –  George Duckett Jul 27 '11 at 15:58
1  
Great minds, and all that ;-) –  Steve Morgan Jul 27 '11 at 15:59
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If they were specific about 52 weeks then I would use -7 * 52, as there are always 7 days in a week. Using .AddYear will take into account leap years, when an extra day exists.

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Ultimatey I expect the AddWeeks is missing purely to avoid massive numbers of methods. Maybe add an extension method:

public static DateTime AddWeeks(this DateTime from, int count) {
    return from.AddDays(7 * count);
}
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It would be slightly different. Subtracting 52 weeks is subtracting 364 days, whereas a year is 365 (366 on leap-years).

There is probably no AddWeeks() because it's easy enough to do AddDays(-7 * numWeeks) to subtract weeks.

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yearOldPrice = _priceService.GetPriceForDate(price.Date.AddDays(-7 * 52); is what you want. Note that adding a year, and adding 52 weeks is different.

If you really want you could make an extension method:

public static class DateTimeExtensions
{
    public static DateTime AddWeeks(this DateTime DT, int Weeks)
    {
        return DT.AddDays(Weeks * 7);
    }
}
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Since you're going beyond the standard supported functionality, I would check out noda-time (the .NET Port of the Java joda-time library).

There you should be able to use the port of DateTime.minusWeeks to get the date you need.

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It's same because week = 7 days (.AddDays(-7 * 52) == .AddWeeks(-52))

but 52 weeek is not a year (.AddDays(-7 * 52) != .AddYears(-1))

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but there's 7*52 + 1 days in most years and 7*52+2 days in leap years so it's clearly not the same –  Rune FS Jul 27 '11 at 15:55
    
That what I sad, why -1? –  Alexander Molodih Jul 27 '11 at 15:57
1  
+1 to offset the -1 which is bizarre! –  BonyT Jul 27 '11 at 15:57
    
not what you said when I posted. at which point your answer said "It's same because week = 7 days" –  Rune FS Jul 27 '11 at 16:00
    
Understand! I meen only aboute weeks) –  Alexander Molodih Jul 27 '11 at 16:02
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