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Why do I get different results when I run equivalent code for hashtable and hashmaps?

Iterator<Integer> it = ht.keySet().iterator();
while(it.hasNext()) {
    i = it.next();
    System.out.println(i + " : " + ht.get(i));
}

ht is a hashtable object. If i replace with hm, a hashmap object, it doesn't print the values from get() method instead prints null. Why is that?

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Are you sure, that you did not forget to switch the objects at initialization? Specifically, that you put the objects into ht, but try to retrieve them from hm? –  DoubleMalt Jul 27 '11 at 16:08
2  
The difference must come from some other reason. Try to output simply ht.toString() for comparison. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 27 '11 at 16:10
3  
I don't get different results when I run a more complete test case . (well, I get different orderings). Would you post the full code that you used? –  Jeff Foster Jul 27 '11 at 16:16
    
Sorry folks, I switched iterator usage at one point which produced bad results. Rectified it, thanks for the comments! –  priyakanth024 Jul 27 '11 at 16:29
    
@dryHump: Could you post an answer with your "solution"? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 27 '11 at 18:33
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While not technically an "answer" to your question (which is not possible due to insufficient code provided in the question), I do have this suggestion regarding code style.

This would have helped you avoid the bug you found in your code (according to your later comment).

The code you provided:

Iterator<Integer> it = ht.keySet().iterator();
while(it.hasNext()) {
    i = it.next();
    System.out.println(i + " : " + ht.get(i));
}

is equivalent to this more elegant foreach loop over the entry set:

for (Map.Entry<Integer, Object> entry : ht.entrySet()) {
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " : " + entry.getValue());
}

Use this form in preference to using the iterator directly if you can.
It's neater, and less code == good

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I think with a HashMap you have to get the entrySet. Then, you can loop over each Entry...

Here's a ref on iterating a HashMap:

http://www.java2s.com/Code/JavaAPI/java.util/HashMapentrySet.htm

I agree with your initial train of thought though - not sure why it works this way...

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2  
You can do this, and it's more efficient, but there's no reason keySet() + get() shouldn't work. –  David Moles Jul 27 '11 at 16:22
    
@David - thanks for this - I'm new to Java and had issues w/ keySet similar to Dry's... I've been using entrySet ever since... apparently to my benefit, but for the wrong reason :) –  Brian Jul 27 '11 at 17:18
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