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With this code I tried to print the string "foo" 10 times in binary format. But why doesn't the function to do it work?

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

template <typename T> void WriteStr2BinFh (string St, ostream &fn) {
     for (unsigned i = 0; i < St.size(); i++) {
         char CStr = St[i];
         fn.write(&CStr.front(), CStr.size());
     }
     return;
}

int main() {
   string MyStr = "Foo";
   ofstream myfile;
   myfile.open("OuputFile.txt", ios::binary|ios::out);

   // We want to print it 10 times horizontally
   // separated with tab

  for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
      WriteStr2BinFh(Mystr+"\t", myfile);
   }

   myfile.close();   
}
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is so much wrong here, I'm just going to list everything I see:

Your for loop condition should be i < 10.

Why are you using a template but not the templatized parameter T?

You're calling the method front() on CStr, but CStr is a char, not a string, so I don't even know how that compiles.

Assuming CStr was a string, you don't want to take the address of the front() iterator using &, instead you want to say something like:

fn.write(St.c_str(), St.size());

And you don't want to loop for St.size() iterations. Just do the above.

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omg, it have a lot of errors:

  • int main - should return value;
  • you don't use template< typename T > in your function;
  • Mystr - not correct name in function call, names in c++ are case sencetive;
  • char CStr - doesn't have method front, and std::string too;
  • you couldn't get address of first element such as in case with vector;
  • it will be better if you will accept std::string as const reference;
  • you forgot to include string header;
  • ...

fixed your example, with your code organize and your naming:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

void WriteStr2BinFh( const std::string& St, std::ostream &out ) 
{
    out.write( St.c_str(), St.size() );
}

int main() 
{
    std::string MyStr = "Foo";
    std::ofstream myfile( "OuputFile.txt", std::ios::binary | std::ios::out );


    for (size_t i = 0; i < 9; ++i) 
    {
    	WriteStr2BinFh( MyStr+"\t", myfile );
    }

   myfile.close();   
   return 0;
}

but I've reccomended to use std::fill_n algorithm

std::fill_n( std::ostream_iterator< std::string >( myfile, "\t" ), 10, MyStr );
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I like an explicit return in main(); however, the C++ standard does require falling off the end of main() to be equivalent to return 0. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 26 '09 at 7:52
    
Intrest fact. I've checked - item 3.6.1.5 of standrd - yes, you right. But anyway, I thnk it should be for clarify. –  bayda Mar 26 '09 at 8:07
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First, char CStr says that CStr is a single character. Second, fn.write(&CStr.front(), CStr.size()); treats that character as a container, like std::vector<>, which of course cannot compile.

Assuming that everything up to WriteStr2BinFh is ok, which I haven't checked, this is how WriteStr2BinFh should (could) look:

void WriteStr2BinFh(const string& St, ostream &fn)
{
    for(string::iterator it = St.begin(); it != St.end(); ++it)
    {
        fn.put(*it);
    }
}

or, preferably

void WriteStr2BinFh(const string& St, ostream &fn)
{
    fn.write(St.c_str(), St.length());
}
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Important points for doing an io operation in binary mode:

  • The file has to be opened in output and binary mode using the flags ios::out (output mode) and ios::binary( binary mode)
  • The function write takes two parameters. The first parameter is of type char* for the data to be written and the second is of type int asking for the size of data to be written to the binary file.
  • File has to be closed at the end.

    void write_to_binary_file(WebSites p_Data)
    {
        fstream binary_file("c:\\test.dat",ios::out|ios::binary|ios::app);
        binary_file.write(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&p_Data),sizeof(WebSites));
        binary_file.close();
    }
    

    This I/O binary function writes some data to the function.

  • The file is opened in output and binary mode with ios::out and ios::binary. There's one more specifier ios::app, which tells the Operating system that the file is also opened in append mode. This means any new set of data will be appended to the end of file.

  • The write function used above, needs the parameter as a character pointer type. So we use a type converter reinterpret_cast to typecast the structure into char* type.

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