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I'm using the JS prototype inheritance pattern from Gavin Kistner and I'm not quite sure why deep inheritance doesn't work for me.

I want C inherits from B inherits from A...

Function.prototype.inheritsFrom = function( parentClassOrObject )
{
   if ( parentClassOrObject.constructor == Function )
   {
      //Normal Inheritance
      this.prototype = new parentClassOrObject;
      this.prototype.constructor = this;
      this.prototype.parent = parentClassOrObject.prototype;
   }
   else
   {
      //Pure Virtual Inheritance
      this.prototype = parentClassOrObject;
      this.prototype.constructor = this;
      this.prototype.parent = parentClassOrObject;
   }
   return this;
}

function A() {
   // ...
}
A.prototype.init = function( arg ) {
   // ...
}

function B() {
   A.apply( this, arguments );  // call super constructor
   // ...
}
B.inheritsFrom( A );
B.prototype.init = function( arg ) {
    B.parent.init.call( this, arg );
    // ...
}

function C() {
   B.apply( this, arguments ); // call super constructor
   // ...
}
C.inheritsFrom( B );
C.prototype.init = function( arg ) {
   this.parent.init.call( this, arg );
   // ...
}

var foo = new C();
foo.init( 10 );  

// Throws an exception: infinite call loop.

When I call foo.init(), I'm actually calling C.init()
Inside C.init() 'this' is of type C
-> this.parent.init.call( this, arg ) is actually calling B.init()
Inside B.init() 'this' is still of type C ( because of .call(this))
-> this.parent.init.call( this, arg ) is, again, calling B.init()

And therefore it goes into an infinite call loop on B.init() ...

What am I doing wrong ?
Should I simply rename 'init' to something else for B and C ? I would rather not, because the current way allows me to call obj.init() whether obj is of type A, B or C...

share|improve this question
2  
inheritance like this is just wrong. Classical OO like this should not be hacked into JavaScript. Please use prototypical OO and traits instead –  Raynos Jul 27 '11 at 19:25
    
@Raynos Raynos is right. Raynos, can you add-in a link to an example you like? –  Prisoner ZERO Jul 27 '11 at 20:46
    
TraitsJS is a great library for prototypical OO. Just limiting yourself to only use Object.create, Trait and only have prototypical inheritance chains one level deep should produce good prototypical OO –  Raynos Jul 27 '11 at 21:02
    
This has been stale for a while, but in the meantime I've learned a bit more and got to agree with Raynos, thanks for the heads up! –  foob.ar Aug 21 '13 at 17:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change B.parent.init.call( this, arg ); to B.prototype.parent.init.call( this, arg );.

share|improve this answer
    
Aaaaah see, this was my problem. It was a typo, this line was actually "this.prototype.parent.init.call( this, arg )". I changed it to use the class name instead of "this", and added '.prototype' as you suggested and it works perfectly ! Thanks !! –  foob.ar Jul 27 '11 at 18:14

This doesn't answer your question, but I have been doing some work with JavaScript inheritance recently. If you want to go the classical route, I can really recommend JS.Class; it's a library that makes classes really easy.

If you can, you should avoid using the library, but if you don't want to deal with the headache of JavaScript inheritance/prototyping, I can recommend JS.Class.

share|improve this answer
    
You should indeed avoid all classical OO emulation. I would also recommend traitsJS as prototypical OO alternative –  Raynos Jul 27 '11 at 19:26
    
That's incorrect. It DID answer my questions ;) –  foob.ar Jul 29 '11 at 16:06

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