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What is a decent way to handle conditional sub-factories with a DI approach. The scenario is the loader object that gets injected into an entry is dependent on the settings of that entry. Originally I was injecting the IoC container into the factory and using that to resolve based on naming conventions. However, I'd really like to keep the factory clean of the container.

The factory is injected into a class that will load all the settings from a database, and then use the factory to create a set of entries. The settings determine which loader will be used inside that given entry.

Edit: Changing code to better highlight the actual question. The issue is that multiple database managers must be supported simultaneously, if this were not the case then it would be simple. The database manager type is determined by the entry settings stored for a particular entry.

public class Entry : IEntry
{
     private ISomething loader;

     public Entry(ISomething something)
     {
         this.loader = something;
     }
}

public class EntryFactory : IEntryFactory
{
    IEntry BuildEntry(IEntrySetting setting)
    {
        //Use setting object to determine which database manager will be used
    }
}

public class EntryManager
{
    public EntryManager(IEntryFactory entryFactory)
    {
        var entrySettings = this.settings.Load();
        foreach(var setting in entrySettings)
        {
             this.entries.Add(entryFactory.BuildEntry(setting));
        }
    }
}

I had considered having the sub-factories register with a primary factory and resolve them that way, but I don't know if there is a better approach.

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1  
You have a runtime input into the dependency resolution mechanism, so I doubt there's a way to achieve complete container independence here. So pushing it off into a factory seems to be the best you can do. You may also find Autofac's relationship types interesting. –  default.kramer Jul 27 '11 at 21:19
    
As I see you are doing work in your entry constructor and that's the problem why the whole DI and factory staff wont work. loader.Load(); Let constructor contain only field initialization. What does the load method do? Does it fills the entry object with data? In this case that's not a constructor job. The factory must put ready to use loaded data into entry, getting it from somewhere else. –  achitaka-san Jul 28 '11 at 22:33
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2 Answers 2

What I typically do is create a wrapper for my DI container... Something like IDependencyResolver... And inject it into my factories. Then, you can have an implementation like StructureMapDependencyResolver that does the lifting. I like this better than injecting the container itself because this keeps me free to change DI containers (almost) instantly. At least my factories don't have to change.

public interface IDependencyResolver
{
    T Resolve<T>();
}

public class UnityDependencyResolver : IDependencyResolver
{
    private readonly IUnityContainer _container;

    public UnityDependencyResolver(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        _container = container;
    }

    public T Resolve<T>()
    {
        return _container.Resolve<T>();
    }
}

This approach is so flexible that you could implement your own Dependency Resolvers and inject them manually.

public class ManualDependencyResolver : IDependencyResolver
{
    public T Resolve<T>()
    {
        if (typeof(T)==typeof(ITransactionRepository))
        {
            return new CheckTransactionRespostory(new DataContext());
        }

        throw new Exception("No dependencies were found for the given type.");
    }
}
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3  
The difficult thing here is that it introduces a bit of a Service Locator pattern.. which maybe fine in factories, but it does make it harder to switch to no container if I needed/wanted to and hides dependencies. –  crb04c Aug 2 '11 at 16:12
    
Good point. I don't mind service locator in factories. However, if you want to remove containers altogether, you could implement your own dependency resolvers that have the class dependencies hard-coded or even configurable via config files. I cringe a little as I type that, but you technically could do it if containers cause you problems. –  Byron Sommardahl Aug 2 '11 at 16:40
    
Passing around the DI container tends to be an antipattern. The container itself is a factory. You've reduced the pain by using a wrapper, but I don't think this is an optimum solution. –  TrueWill Aug 2 '11 at 16:58
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It depends on what your DI framework allows and you didn't specify it. Using Autofac delegate-based registration, I came to the following solutions. Note that ILoaderFactory and IEntryFactory have been replaced by simple Func<> factories in both cases.

Solution 1, using two factories:

public class EntryManager
{
    public EntryManager(Func<ILoader, IEntry> entryFactory, Func<Settings, ILoader> loaderFactory)
    {
        var entrySettings = this.settings.Load();
        foreach(var setting in entrySettings)
        {
            this.entries.Add(entryFactory(loaderFactory(setting)));
        }
    }
}

private static ILoader SelectLoader(IEntrySetting settings)
{
    // your custom loader selection logic
}

var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
builder.RegisterType<EntryManager>();
builder.RegisterType<Entry>().As<IEntry>();
builder.Register((c, p) => SelectLoader(p.TypedAs<IEntrySetting>()));
IContainer container = builder.Build();
container.Resolve<EntryManager>();

Solution 2, using only one factory:

public class EntryManager
{
    public EntryManager(Func<IEntrySetting, IEntry> entryFactory)
    {
        var entrySettings = this.settings.Load();
        foreach(var setting in entrySettings)
        {
            this.entries.Add(entryFactory(setting));
        }
    }
}

private static ILoader SelectLoader(IEntrySetting settings)
{
    // your custom loader selection logic
}

var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
builder.RegisterType<EntryManager>();
builder.Register((c, p) => new Entry(SelectLoader(p.TypedAs<IEntrySetting>()))).As<IEntry>();
IContainer container = builder.Build();
container.Resolve<EntryManager>();
share|improve this answer
    
The selection logic is the part I'm questioning, I use to let the container itself resolve the types based on the settings by resolving with named registrations from the factory. The question is what are good ways to separate the factory from having explicit knowledge of the container. –  crb04c Jul 27 '11 at 22:05
    
Unity supports automatic factories as well. –  TrueWill Aug 2 '11 at 16:56
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