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This is one of an interview question. You need to design a stack which holds an integer value such that getMinimum() function should return the minimum element in the stack.

For example: consider the below example

case #1

5  --> TOP
1
4
6
2

When getMinimum() is called it should return 1, which is the minimum element 
in the stack. 

case #2

stack.pop()
stack.pop()

Note: Both 5 and 1 are poped out of the stack. So after this, the stack
looks like,

4  --> TOP
6
2

When getMinimum() is called is should return 2 which is the minimum in the 
stack.

Constriants:

  1. getMinimum should return the minimum value in O(1)
  2. Space constraint also has to be considered while designing it and if you use extra space, it should be of constant space.
share|improve this question
    
you need to design your own implementation of stack .. –  Ganesh M Mar 26 '09 at 9:58
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10 Answers 10

up vote 72 down vote accepted

EDIT: This fails the "constant space" constraint - it basically doubles the space required. I very much doubt that there's a solution which doesn't do that though, without wrecking the runtime complexity somewhere (e.g. making push/pop O(n)). Note that this doesn't change the complexity of the space required, e.g. if you've got a stack with O(n) space requirements, this will still be O(n) just with a different constant factor.

Non-constant-space solution

Keep a "duplicate" stack of "minimum of all values lower in the stack". When you pop the main stack, pop the min stack too. When you push the main stack, push either the new element or the current min, whichever is lower. getMinimum() is then implemented as just minStack.peek().

So using your example, we'd have:

Real stack        Min stack

5  --> TOP        1
1                 1
4                 2
6                 2
2                 2

After popping twice you get:

Real stack        Min stack

4                 2
6                 2
2                 2

Please let me know if this isn't enough information. It's simple when you grok it, but it might take a bit of head-scratching at first :)

(The downside of course is that it doubles the space requirement. Execution time doesn't suffer significantly though - i.e. it's still the same complexity.)

EDIT: There's a variation which is slightly more fiddly, but has better space in general. We still have the min stack, but we only pop from it when the value we pop from the main stack is equal to the one on the min stack. We only push to the min stack when the value being pushed onto the main stack is less than or equal to the current min value. This allows duplicate min values. getMinimum() is still just a peek operation. For example, taking the original version and pushing 1 again, we'd get:

Real stack        Min stack

1  --> TOP        1
5                 1
1                 2
4                 
6                 
2

Popping from the above pops from both stacks because 1 == 1, leaving:

Real stack        Min stack

5  --> TOP        1
1                 2
4                 
6                 
2

Popping again only pops from the main stack, because 5 > 1:

Real stack        Min stack

1                 1
4                 2
6                 
2

Popping again pops both stacks because 1 == 1:

Real stack        Min stack

4                 2
6                 
2

This ends up with the same worst case space complexity (double the original stack) but much better space usage if we rarely get a "new minimum or equal".

EDIT: Here's an implementation of Pete's evil scheme. I haven't tested it thoroughly, but I think it's okay :)

using System.Collections.Generic;

public class FastMinStack<T>
{
    private readonly Stack<T> stack = new Stack<T>();
    // Could pass this in to the constructor
    private readonly IComparer<T> comparer = Comparer<T>.Default;

    private T currentMin;

    public T Minimum
    {
        get { return currentMin; }
    }

    public void Push(T element)
    {
        if (stack.Count == 0 ||
            comparer.Compare(element, currentMin) <= 0)
        {
            stack.Push(currentMin);
            stack.Push(element);
            currentMin = element;
        }
        else
        {
            stack.Push(element);
        }
    }

    public T Pop()
    {
        T ret = stack.Pop();
        if (comparer.Compare(ret, currentMin) == 0)
        {
            currentMin = stack.Pop();
        }
        return ret;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's hardly constant space, though. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 26 '09 at 9:35
    
and i worried about the runtime also .. –  Ganesh M Mar 26 '09 at 9:35
    
@Konrad: I hadn't seen the space constraint. Will leave answer, but edit to explain the problem. @Ganesh: What worries you about that? If you've already got an efficient stack (e.g. using a linked list) then it's just double that, which is the same complexity. –  Jon Skeet Mar 26 '09 at 9:38
1  
Clever! @Ganesh: Why would the runtime be a problem? It will take only twice as long as a single stack, i.e. it's still O(1) time for push() and pop() as well as for getMinimum() -- that's excellent performance! –  j_random_hacker Mar 26 '09 at 9:40
1  
If you have a single variable, what happens when you pop the "1" in your example? It's got to work out that the previous minimum was "2" - which it can't without scanning through everything. –  Jon Skeet Mar 26 '09 at 9:47
show 13 more comments

Add a field to hold the minimum value and update it during Pop() and Push(). That way getMinimum() will be O(1), but Pop() and Push() will have to do a little more work.

If minimum value is popped, Pop() will be O(n), otherwise they will still both be O(1). When resizing Push() becomes O(n) as per the Stack implementation.

Here's a quick implementation

public sealed class MinStack {
    private int MinimumValue;
    private readonly Stack<int> Stack = new Stack<int>();

    public int GetMinimum() {
        if (IsEmpty) {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Stack is empty");
        }
        return MinimumValue;
    }

    public int Pop() {
        var value = Stack.Pop();
        if (value == MinimumValue) {
            MinimumValue = Stack.Min();
        }
        return value;
    }

    public void Push(int value) {
        if (IsEmpty || value < MinimumValue) {
            MinimumValue = value;
        }
        Stack.Push(value);
    }

    private bool IsEmpty { get { return Stack.Count() == 0; } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry I didnt understand why does pop() and push() will suffer ? –  Ganesh M Mar 26 '09 at 9:34
    
Because you have to check/update the minimum value when pushing/poping. –  Brian Rasmussen Mar 26 '09 at 9:37
2  
In pop() the "new" minimum element has to be found, which takes O(n). Push() won't suffer, as this operation is still O(1). –  Georg Schölly Mar 26 '09 at 9:43
1  
@sigjuice: correct. I think I will change the word "suffer" to something less dramatic :) –  Brian Rasmussen Mar 26 '09 at 9:53
3  
+1 Given the rules, this one is the answer. –  eglasius Mar 26 '09 at 18:40
show 9 more comments

Well, what are the runtime constraints of push and pop? If they are not required to be constant, then just calculate the minimum value in those two operations (making them O(n)). Otherwise, I don't see how this can be done with constant additional space.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, hehe... The old "bend the rules" trick... In a similar way, I know of a sorting algorithm that sorts any size array in O(1) time, but the first access to any element of the result incurs O(nlog n) overhead... :) –  j_random_hacker Mar 26 '09 at 9:43
1  
In Haskell, everything is constant time! (except if you want to print the result) –  Henk Mar 27 '09 at 4:56
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public class StackWithMin {
    int min;
    int size;
    int[] data = new int[1024];

    public void push ( int val ) {
        if ( size == 0 ) {
            data[size] = val;
            min = val;
        } else if ( val < min) {
            data[size] = 2 * val - min;
            min = val;

            assert (data[size] < min); 
        } else {
            data[size] = val;
        }

        ++size;

        // check size and grow array
    }

    public int getMin () {
        return min;
    }

    public int pop () {
        --size;

        int val = data[size];

        if ( ( size > 0 ) && ( val < min ) ) {
            int prevMin = min;
            min += min - val;
            return prevMin;
        } else {
            return val;
        }
    }

    public boolean isEmpty () {
        return size == 0;
    }

    public static void main (String...args) {
        StackWithMin stack = new StackWithMin();

        for ( String arg: args ) 
            stack.push( Integer.parseInt( arg ) );

        while ( ! stack.isEmpty() ) {
            int min = stack.getMin();
            int val = stack.pop();

            System.out.println( val + " " + min );
        }

        System.out.println();
    }

}

It stores the current minimum explicitly, and if the minimum changes, instead of pushing the value, it pushes a value the same difference the other side of the new minimum ( if min = 7 and you push 5, it pushes 3 instead ( 5-|7-5| = 3) and sets min to 5; if you then pop 3 when min is 5 it sees that the popped value is less than min, so reverses the procedure to get 7 for the new min, then returns the previous min). As any value which doesn't cause a change the current minimum is greater than the current minimum, you have something that can be used to differentiate between values which change the minimum and ones which don't.

In languages which use fixed size integers, you're borrowing a bit of space from the representation of the values, so it may underflow and the assert will fail. But otherwise, it's constant extra space and all operations are still O(1).

Stacks which are based instead on linked lists have other places you can borrow a bit from, for example in C the least significant bit of the next pointer, or in Java the type of the objects in the linked list. For Java this does mean there's more space used compared to a contiguous stack, as you have the object overhead per link:

public class LinkedStackWithMin {
    private static class Link {
        final int value;
        final Link next;

        Link ( int value, Link next ) {
            this.value = value;
            this.next = next;
        }

        int pop ( LinkedStackWithMin stack ) {
            stack.top = next;
            return value;
        }
    }

    private static class MinLink extends Link {
        MinLink ( int value, Link next ) {
            super( value, next );
        }

        int pop ( LinkedStackWithMin stack ) {
            stack.top = next;
            int prevMin = stack.min;
            stack.min = value;
            return prevMin;
        }
    }

    Link top;
    int min;

    public LinkedStackWithMin () {
    }

    public void push ( int val ) {
        if ( ( top == null ) || ( val < min ) ) {
            top = new MinLink(min, top);
            min = val;
        } else {
            top = new Link(val, top);
        }
    }

    public int pop () {
        return top.pop(this);
    }

    public int getMin () {
        return min;
    }

    public boolean isEmpty () {
        return top == null;
    }

In C, the overhead isn't there, and you can borrow the lsb of the next pointer:

typedef struct _stack_link stack_with_min;

typedef struct _stack_link stack_link;

struct _stack_link {
    size_t  next;
    int     value;
};

stack_link* get_next ( stack_link* link ) 
{
    return ( stack_link * )( link -> next & ~ ( size_t ) 1 );
}

bool is_min ( stack_link* link )
{
    return ( link -> next & 1 ) ! = 0;
}

void push ( stack_with_min* stack, int value )
{
    stack_link *link = malloc ( sizeof( stack_link ) );

    link -> next = ( size_t ) stack -> next;

    if ( (stack -> next == 0) || ( value == stack -> value ) ) {
        link -> value = stack -> value;
        link -> next |= 1; // mark as min
    } else {
        link -> value = value;
    }

    stack -> next = link;
}

etc.;

However, none of these are truly O(1). They don't require any more space in practice, because they exploit holes in the representations of numbers, objects or pointers in these languages. But a theoretical machine which used a more compact representation would require an extra bit to be added to that representation in each case.

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Here is my Code which runs with O(1). The previous code which I posted had problem when the minimum element gets popped. I modified my code. This one uses another Stack that maintains minimum element present in stack above the current pushed element.

 class StackDemo
{
    int[] stk = new int[100];
    int top;
    public StackDemo()
    {
        top = -1;
    }
    public void Push(int value)
    {
        if (top == 100)
            Console.WriteLine("Stack Overflow");
        else
            stk[++top] = value;
    }
    public bool IsEmpty()
    {
        if (top == -1)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
    public int Pop()
    {
        if (IsEmpty())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Stack Underflow");
            return 0;
        }
        else
            return stk[top--];
    }
    public void Display()
    {
        for (int i = top; i >= 0; i--)
            Console.WriteLine(stk[i]);
    }
}
class MinStack : StackDemo
{
    int top;
    int[] stack = new int[100];
    StackDemo s1; int min;
    public MinStack()
    {
        top = -1;
        s1 = new StackDemo();
    }
    public void PushElement(int value)
    {
        s1.Push(value);
        if (top == 100)
            Console.WriteLine("Stack Overflow");
        if (top == -1)
        {
            stack[++top] = value;
            stack[++top] = value;   
        }
        else
        {
            //  stack[++top]=value;
            int ele = PopElement();
            stack[++top] = ele;
            int a = MininmumElement(min, value);
              stack[++top] = min;

                stack[++top] = value;
                stack[++top] = a;


        }
    }
    public int PopElement()
    {

        if (top == -1)
            return 1000;
        else
        {
            min = stack[top--];
            return stack[top--];
        }

    }
    public int PopfromStack()
    {
        if (top == -1)
            return 1000;
        else
        {
            s1.Pop();
            return PopElement();
        }
    }
    public int MininmumElement(int a,int b)
    {
        if (a > b)
            return b;
        else
            return a;
    }
    public int StackTop()
    {
        return stack[top];
    }
    public void DisplayMinStack()
    {
        for (int i = top; i >= 0; i--)
            Console.WriteLine(stack[i]);
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MinStack ms = new MinStack();
        ms.PushElement(15);
        ms.PushElement(2);
        ms.PushElement(1);
        ms.PushElement(13);
        ms.PushElement(5);
        ms.PushElement(21);
        Console.WriteLine("Min Stack");
        ms.DisplayMinStack();
        Console.WriteLine("Minimum Element:"+ms.StackTop());
        ms.PopfromStack();
        ms.PopfromStack();
        ms.PopfromStack();
        ms.PopfromStack();

        Console.WriteLine("Min Stack");
        ms.DisplayMinStack();
        Console.WriteLine("Minimum Element:" + ms.StackTop());
        Thread.Sleep(1000000);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Please mention the programming language used here to write code. It helps potential visitors clue as what's going on based on syntax. I assume it C# but what if someone doesn't? –  PK' Feb 19 at 1:30
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I used a different kind of stack. Here is the implementation.

//
//  main.cpp
//  Eighth
//
//  Created by chaitanya on 4/11/13.
//  Copyright (c) 2013 cbilgika. All rights reserved.
//

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
using namespace std;
struct stack
{
    int num;
    int minnum;
}a[100];

void push(int n,int m,int &top)
{

    top++;
    if (top>=100) {
        cout<<"Stack Full";
        cout<<endl;
    }
    else{
        a[top].num = n;
        a[top].minnum = m;
    }


}

void pop(int &top)
{
    if (top<0) {
        cout<<"Stack Empty";
        cout<<endl;
    }
    else{
       top--; 
    }


}
void print(int &top)
{
    cout<<"Stack: "<<endl;
    for (int j = 0; j<=top ; j++) {
        cout<<"("<<a[j].num<<","<<a[j].minnum<<")"<<endl;
    }
}


void get_min(int &top)
{
    if (top < 0)
    {
        cout<<"Empty Stack";
    }
    else{
        cout<<"Minimum element is: "<<a[top].minnum;
    }
    cout<<endl;
}

int main()
{

    int top = -1,min = numeric_limits<int>::min(),num;
    cout<<"Enter the list to push (-1 to stop): ";
    cin>>num;
    while (num!=-1) {
        if (top == -1) {
            min = num;
            push(num, min, top);
        }
        else{
            if (num < min) {
                min = num;
            }
            push(num, min, top);
        }
        cin>>num;
    }
    print(top);
    get_min(top);
    return 0;
}

Output:

Enter the list to push (-1 to stop): 5
1
4
6
2
-1
Stack: 
(5,5)
(1,1)
(4,1)
(6,1)
(2,1)
Minimum element is: 1

Try it. I think it answers the question. The second element of every pair gives the minimum value seen when that element was inserted.

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Here is my version of implementation.

 struct MyStack {
    int element;
    int *CurrentMiniAddress;
 };

 void Push(int value)
 {
    // Create you structure and populate the value
    MyStack S = new MyStack();
    S->element = value;

    if(Stack.Empty())
    {    
        // Since the stack is empty, point CurrentMiniAddress to itself
        S->CurrentMiniAddress = S;

    }
    else
    {
         // Stack is not empty

         // Retrieve the top element. No Pop()
         MyStack *TopElement = Stack.Top();

         // Remember Always the TOP element points to the
         // minimum element in ths whole stack
         if (S->element CurrentMiniAddress->element)
         {
         	// If the current value is the minimum in the whole stack
         	// then S points to itself
         	S->CurrentMiniAddress = S;
         }
             else
             {
                 // So this is not the minimum in the whole stack
                 // No worries, TOP is holding the minimum element
                 S->CurrentMiniAddress = TopElement->CurrentMiniAddress;
             }

    }
        Stack.Add(S);
 }

 void Pop()
 {
     if(!Stack.Empty())
     {
        Stack.Pop();
     }  
 }

 int GetMinimum(Stack &stack)
 {
       if(!stack.Empty())
       {
        	MyStack *Top  = stack.top();
        	// Top always points to the minimumx
        	return  Top->CurrentMiniAddress->element;
        }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I Agree, this requires an additional element in your struct. But this eliminates finding the minimum whenever we pop an element. –  Ganesh M Mar 26 '09 at 10:45
    
So, having failed to meet the constraints of the question, did you get the job? –  Pete Kirkham Mar 26 '09 at 11:33
    
nope I didn't :) –  Ganesh M Mar 26 '09 at 11:34
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public class MinStack{

private final LinkedList<E> mainStack = new LinkedList<E>();
private final LinkedList<E> minStack = new LinkedList<E>();
private final Comparator<E> comparator;

public MinStack(Comparator<E> comparator) 
{
    this.comparator = comparator;
}

/**
 * Pushes an element onto the stack.
 *
 *
 * @param e the element to push
 */
public void push(E e) {
    mainStack.push(e);
    if(minStack.isEmpty())
    {
        minStack.push(e);
    }
    else if(comparator.compare(e, minStack.peek())<=0)
    {
        minStack.push(e);
    }
    else
    {
        minStack.push(minStack.peek());
    }
}

/**
 * Pops an element from the stack.
 *
 *
 * @throws NoSuchElementException if this stack is empty
 */
public E pop() {
   minStack.pop();
   return  mainStack.pop();
}

/**
 * Returns but not remove smallest element from the stack. Return null if stack is empty.
 *
 */
public E getMinimum()
{
    return minStack.peek();
}

@Override
public String toString() {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append("Main stack{");
    for (E e : mainStack) {         
        sb.append(e.toString()).append(",");
    }
    sb.append("}");

    sb.append(" Min stack{");
    for (E e : minStack) {          
        sb.append(e.toString()).append(",");
    }
    sb.append("}");

    sb.append(" Minimum = ").append(getMinimum());
    return sb.toString();
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    MinStack<Integer> st = new MinStack<Integer>(Comparators.INTEGERS);

    st.push(2);
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.push(6);
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2,6}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.push(4);
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2,6,4}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.push(1);
    Assert.assertTrue("1 is min in stack {2,6,4,1}", st.getMinimum().equals(1));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.push(5);
    Assert.assertTrue("1 is min in stack {2,6,4,1,5}", st.getMinimum().equals(1));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.pop();
    Assert.assertTrue("1 is min in stack {2,6,4,1}", st.getMinimum().equals(1));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.pop();
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2,6,4}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.pop();
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2,6}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.pop();
    Assert.assertTrue("2 is min in stack {2}", st.getMinimum().equals(2));
    System.out.println(st);

    st.pop();
    Assert.assertTrue("null is min in stack {}", st.getMinimum()==null);
    System.out.println(st);
}

}

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My Java implementation for this stack https://github.com/zouzhile/interview/blob/master/src/com/interview/datastructures/stack/MinStack.java

share|improve this answer
    
Broken URL, please fix it for future visitors. –  PK' Mar 16 at 17:27
    
it's not broken, I can access it without any problem. Can you have a try again please? –  Zhile Zou Apr 22 at 9:03
    
It works now but wasn't working the last time I tried. Anyways, thanks for confirming and sharing the common goal. –  PK' Apr 25 at 19:52
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I think only push operation suffers, is enough. My implementation includes a stack of nodes. Each node contain the data item and also the minimum on that moment. This minimum is updated each time a push operation is done.

Here are some points for understanding:

  • I implemented the stack using Linked List.

  • A pointer top always points to the last pushed item. When there is no item in that stack top is NULL.

  • When an item is pushed a new node is allocated which has a next pointer that points to the previous stack and top is updated to point to this new node.

Only difference with normal stack implementation is that during push it updates a member min for the new node.

Please have a look at code which is implemented in C++ for demonstration purpose.

/*
 *  Implementation of Stack that can give minimum in O(1) time all the time
 *  This solution uses same data structure for minimum variable, it could be implemented using pointers but that will be more space consuming
 */

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef struct stackLLNodeType stackLLNode;

struct stackLLNodeType {
    int item;
    int min;
    stackLLNode *next;
};

class DynamicStack {
private:
    int stackSize;
    stackLLNode *top;

public:
    DynamicStack();
    ~DynamicStack();
    void push(int x);
    int pop();
    int getMin();
    int size() { return stackSize; }
};

void pushOperation(DynamicStack& p_stackObj, int item);
void popOperation(DynamicStack& p_stackObj);

int main () {
    DynamicStack stackObj;

    pushOperation(stackObj, 3);
    pushOperation(stackObj, 1);
    pushOperation(stackObj, 2);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    pushOperation(stackObj, 4);
    pushOperation(stackObj, 7);
    pushOperation(stackObj, 6);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);
    popOperation(stackObj);

    return 0;
}

DynamicStack::DynamicStack() {
    // initialization
    stackSize = 0;
    top = NULL;
}

DynamicStack::~DynamicStack() {
    stackLLNode* tmp;
    // chain memory deallocation to avoid memory leak
    while (top) {
        tmp = top;
        top = top->next;
        delete tmp;
    }
}

void DynamicStack::push(int x) {
    // allocate memory for new node assign to top
    if (top==NULL) {
        top = new stackLLNode;
        top->item = x;
        top->next = NULL;
        top->min = top->item;
    }
    else {
        // allocation of memory
        stackLLNode *tmp = new stackLLNode;
        // assign the new item
        tmp->item = x;
        tmp->next = top;

        // store the minimum so that it does not get lost after pop operation of later minimum
        if (x < top->min)
            tmp->min = x;
        else
            tmp->min = top->min;

        // update top to new node
        top = tmp;
    }
    stackSize++;
}

int DynamicStack::pop() {
    // check if stack is empty
    if (top == NULL)
        return -1;

    stackLLNode* tmp = top;
    int curItem = top->item;
    top = top->next;
    delete tmp;
    stackSize--;
    return curItem;
}

int DynamicStack::getMin() {
    if (top == NULL)
        return -1;
    return top->min;
}
void pushOperation(DynamicStack& p_stackObj, int item) {
    cout<<"Just pushed: "<<item<<endl;
    p_stackObj.push(item);
    cout<<"Current stack min: "<<p_stackObj.getMin()<<endl;
    cout<<"Current stack size: "<<p_stackObj.size()<<endl<<endl;
}

void popOperation(DynamicStack& p_stackObj) {
    int popItem = -1;
    if ((popItem = p_stackObj.pop()) == -1 )
        cout<<"Cannot pop. Stack is empty."<<endl;
    else {
        cout<<"Just popped: "<<popItem<<endl;
        if (p_stackObj.getMin() == -1)
            cout<<"No minimum. Stack is empty."<<endl;
        else
            cout<<"Current stack min: "<<p_stackObj.getMin()<<endl;
        cout<<"Current stack size: "<<p_stackObj.size()<<endl<<endl;
    }
}

And the output of the program looks like this:

Just pushed: 3
Current stack min: 3
Current stack size: 1

Just pushed: 1
Current stack min: 1
Current stack size: 2

Just pushed: 2
Current stack min: 1
Current stack size: 3

Just popped: 2
Current stack min: 1
Current stack size: 2

Just popped: 1
Current stack min: 3
Current stack size: 1

Just popped: 3
No minimum. Stack is empty.
Current stack size: 0

Cannot pop. Stack is empty.
Just pushed: 4
Current stack min: 4
Current stack size: 1

Just pushed: 7
Current stack min: 4
Current stack size: 2

Just pushed: 6
Current stack min: 4
Current stack size: 3

Just popped: 6
Current stack min: 4
Current stack size: 2

Just popped: 7
Current stack min: 4
Current stack size: 1

Just popped: 4
No minimum. Stack is empty.
Current stack size: 0

Cannot pop. Stack is empty.
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