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This seems really straight forward, and I think I just want to validate and ensure that I'm doing this correctly.

Basically I want to run an UPDATE on these records:

SELECT     contact.company, contact.coaddress, contact.costate, contact.cocity, contact.cozip, contact.phonebusiness, dial.AgentID, dial.Attempts, dial.CRC
FROM         contact LEFT OUTER JOIN
                  dial ON contact.DialID = dial.DialID
WHERE     (dial.AgentID > '-1') AND (contact.cozip LIKE '600%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '601%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '606%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '608%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '605%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '604%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '613%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '611%')

I get back my correct results on the SELECT statement. I need to now UPDATE those records:

UPDATE    dial
SET              ProjectID = '60'
FROM         dial INNER JOIN
                  contact ON dial.DialID = contact.DialID
WHERE     (dial.AgentID > '-1') AND (contact.cozip LIKE '600%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '601%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '606%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '608%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '605%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '604%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '613%' OR
                  contact.cozip LIKE '611%')

Does this look correct? Is there a more efficient way of doing this?

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3  
put the update statement in a transaction and test it. Looks fine but nothing prevents you from testing in the safety of a transaction first. –  Andrew Jul 27 '11 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, this looks correct.

There are some LIKE tricks and I like aliases personally. The alias d makes it clear which table is being updated in the JOIN. The [] in the LIKE means a range or set

UPDATE
    d
SET 
    ProjectID = '60'
FROM
    dial d
    INNER JOIN
    contact ON d.DialID = contact.DialID
WHERE
   (d.AgentID > -1) --edit, int. Not varchar
   AND 
   (contact.cozip LIKE '60[016854]%' OR contact.cozip LIKE '61[13]%')

Should AgentID be the number -1 too?

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No, AgentID should contain 0 and above, anything below 0 is not part of the criteria. –  RogueSpear00 Jul 27 '11 at 20:43
    
@gbn will mssql be able to use indexes with those wildchars combined with 'or'. I had some bad experiences using wildchars combined with 'or' ? –  t-clausen.dk Jul 27 '11 at 20:46
    
@t-clausen.dk: maybe, maybe not... Your LEFT will definitely not use an index. –  gbn Jul 27 '11 at 21:16
    
@RogueSpear00: I meant, why do you have a string in the query? is AgentID varchar? –  gbn Jul 27 '11 at 21:16
    
I know my method will not use index. I was wondering if your script will solve some of my RL code issues –  t-clausen.dk Jul 27 '11 at 21:54

That looks like the correct syntax to me for Deleting or Updating based on a JOIN.

Note that you could alternately use a subquery and the IN operator, e.g. "UPDATE dial SET ProjectID = '60' WHERE DialID in (SELECT DialID from dial...)".

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