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Excuse me for my question for the valarray again. I am trying to use it since it is much like the matlab while operating the vector & matrices. I first did some performance check and found that valarray cannot achieve the performance declared as in the book c++ programming language by stroustrup.

The test program actually did 5M multiplication of doubles. I thought that c=a*b would at least be comparable to the for loop double type element multiplication, but I am totally wrong. Tried on several computers and vc6.0 and vs2008.

By the way, I tested on matlab using the following code:

len=5*1024*1024;
a=rand(len,1);b=rand(len,1);c=zeros(len,1);
tic;c=a.*b;toc;

and the result is 46ms. This time is not high precision, only works as a reference.

The code is:

#include <iostream>
#include <valarray>
#include <iostream>
#include "windows.h"

using namespace std ;
SYSTEMTIME stime;
LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;

double gettime_hp();

int main()
{
    enum { N = 5*1024*1024 };
    valarray<double> a(N), b(N), c(N) ;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&sys_freq);   
    int i,j;
    for(  j=0 ; j<8 ; ++j )
    {
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) 
        {
            a[i]=rand();
            b[i]=rand();
        }

        double* a1 = &a[0], *b1 = &b[0], *c1 = &c[0] ;
        double dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        c = a*b ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c[i] = a[i] * b[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray[i] operator* " << dtime<< " ms\n" ;

        cout << "------------------------------------------------------\n" ;
    }
}

double gettime_hp()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER tick;
    extern LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&tick);
    return (double)tick.QuadPart*1000.0/sys_freq.QuadPart;
}

The running results: (release mode with maximal speed optimization)

double operator* 52.3019 ms
valarray operator* 128.338 ms
valarray[i] operator* 43.1801 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 43.4036 ms
valarray operator* 145.533 ms
valarray[i] operator* 44.9121 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 43.2619 ms
valarray operator* 158.681 ms
valarray[i] operator* 43.4871 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 42.7317 ms
valarray operator* 173.164 ms
valarray[i] operator* 80.1004 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 43.2236 ms
valarray operator* 158.004 ms
valarray[i] operator* 44.3813 ms
------------------------------------------------------

debugging mode with same optimization:

double operator* 41.8123 ms
valarray operator* 201.484 ms
valarray[i] operator* 41.5452 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 40.2238 ms
valarray operator* 215.351 ms
valarray[i] operator* 40.2076 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 40.5859 ms
valarray operator* 232.007 ms
valarray[i] operator* 40.8803 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 40.9734 ms
valarray operator* 234.325 ms
valarray[i] operator* 40.9711 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 41.1977 ms
valarray operator* 234.409 ms
valarray[i] operator* 41.1429 ms
------------------------------------------------------
double operator* 39.7754 ms
valarray operator* 234.26 ms
valarray[i] operator* 39.6338 ms
------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question
    
Did you run the executable ? or did you try it in a debugger (through visual studio) ? –  Yochai Timmer Jul 27 '11 at 20:34
    
What optimisation settings are you using? –  Alan Stokes Jul 27 '11 at 20:37
    
There shows no difference either in debugger or exe –  shangping Jul 27 '11 at 20:38
    
VC6? Really? It's 13 years old and predates the standard. –  Alan Stokes Jul 27 '11 at 20:38
4  
On GCC 4.6.1 with -flto -O3 -march=native -std=c++0x, I get nearly identical performance for all three cases, with a tiny increase from first to third. –  Kerrek SB Jul 27 '11 at 20:56
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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect that the reason c = a*b is so much slower than performing the operations an element at a time is that the

template<class T> valarray<T> operator*
    (const valarray<T>&, const valarray<T>&);

operator must allocate memory to put the result into, then returns that by value.

Even if a "swaptimization" is used to perform the copy, that function still has the overhead of

  • allocating the new block for the resulting valarray
  • initializing the new valarray (it's possible that this might be optimized away)
  • putting the results into the new valarray
  • paging in the memory for the new valarray as it is initialized or set with result values
  • deallocating the old valarray that gets replaced by the result
share|improve this answer
    
I just searched, it actually returns a reference: template<class _Ty> inline valarray<_Ty>& operator*=(valarray<_Ty>& _L, const _Ty& _R) {_VALGOP2(*= _R); } –  shangping Jul 27 '11 at 20:57
1  
There are two differences in the declaration you posted in the comment above from what would be used in the code posted in the question: 1) operator*= is different than using operator*() followed by operator=(), and 2) that's the declaration for the *= operator that takes a scalar argument to multiply the valarray by –  Michael Burr Jul 27 '11 at 21:02
    
Michael you are right, I am too rush –  shangping Jul 27 '11 at 21:09
    
Michael, according to the analysis, we have no way to use the valarray if performance is needed. However, according to the book, this class is specially designed for improving performance. Would you give me some points? Any other method to allow me to handle arrays as a whole just as valarray in c++? Thanks –  shangping Jul 27 '11 at 21:13
5  
News flash: valarray arithmetic is allowed but not required to use expression templates (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expression_templates). Use of expression templates can completely eliminate temporaries in the OP's problem, and thus completely eliminate heap allocation and deallocation for the expression c = a*b. It is evident that gcc does this (and a slightly corrected libc++), and that MS C++ doesn't. –  Howard Hinnant Jul 27 '11 at 23:47
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valarray is really not very good for anything aside from very simple operations, and it's performance is quite poor. If you require numerical operations similar to matlab then you should try a library optimised for this purpose. Have a look through the many projects listed at Object Oriented Numerics and you should find something that's as simple as valarray but which is more optimised for matrix and vector operations.

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3  
Your answer to the question of why valarray is slow appears to be that valarray is slow. Maybe this answer should have just been a comment? –  Rob Kennedy Jul 27 '11 at 21:29
    
Have especially a look at Blitz++ (old, but great) and Armadillo (more BLAS/LAPACK oriented, but actively maintained). Also Intel Array Building Blocks is great. –  Alexandre C. Jul 27 '11 at 21:29
1  
-1: empirical evidence seems to suggest otherwise - it's probably not a good idea to make blanket statements about performance unless you've done a reasonable amount of benchmarking to back it up –  Paul R Jul 27 '11 at 21:30
    
I have attempted to use valarray in the past for matrix/vector work (not for a few years though) and found it to be just not performant enough so I wrote my own. My answer was intended to highlight that valarray is good for simple cases where you need to perform arithmetic operations on a sequence of numbers, but that if you need proper vector arithmetic then you need a proper vector library. @Paul R: do you have evidence to back your statement up? –  the_mandrill Jul 28 '11 at 19:29
1  
@the_mandrill: yes - see the benchmarks I posted in my answer above/below. –  Paul R Jul 28 '11 at 19:45
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I just tried it on a Linux x86-64 system (Sandy Bridge CPU):

gcc 4.5.0:

double operator* 9.64185 ms
valarray operator* 9.36987 ms
valarray[i] operator* 9.35815 ms

Intel ICC 12.0.2:

double operator* 7.76757 ms
valarray operator* 9.60208 ms
valarray[i] operator* 7.51409 ms

In both cases I just used -O3 and no other optimisation-related flags.

It looks like the MS C++ compiler and/or valarray implementation suck.


Here's the OP's code modified for Linux:

#include <iostream>
#include <valarray>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std ;

double gettime_hp();

int main()
{
    enum { N = 5*1024*1024 };
    valarray<double> a(N), b(N), c(N) ;
    int i,j;
    for(  j=0 ; j<8 ; ++j )
    {
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i )
        {
            a[i]=rand();
            b[i]=rand();
        }

        double* a1 = &a[0], *b1 = &b[0], *c1 = &c[0] ;
        double dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        c = a*b ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c[i] = a[i] * b[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray[i] operator* " << dtime<< " ms\n" ;

        cout << "------------------------------------------------------\n" ;
    }
}

double gettime_hp()
{
    struct timespec timestamp;

    clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &timestamp);
    return timestamp.tv_sec * 1000.0 + timestamp.tv_nsec * 1.0e-6;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice - just for reference, could you add the options used in the build (I may play around with this stuff tonight...) –  Michael Burr Jul 27 '11 at 22:27
2  
+1. I ran this benchmark on the libc++ implementation. It wasn't as slow as MS, but wasn't as fast as gcc (it was about the same speed as you report for ICC). Turns out I was missing a key assignment operator in the expression template engine. Added that. Now libc++ is as fast as gcc. To the OP: Thanks for the speed test! (+1 on the question too) :-) –  Howard Hinnant Jul 27 '11 at 23:24
    
Thanks both - I've added a note re compiler switches (just -O3 in both cases) and also appended the OP's code modified for Linux that I used for these tests. –  Paul R Jul 28 '11 at 6:55
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I'm compiling in release x64, VS 2010. I changed your code very slightly:

    double* a1 = &a[0], *b1 = &b[0], *c1 = &c[0] ;
    double dtime=gettime_hp();
    for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) a1[i] *= b1[i] ;
    dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
    cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

    dtime=gettime_hp();
    a *= b;
    dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
    cout << "valarray operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

    dtime=gettime_hp();
    for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) a[i] *= b[i] ;
    dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
    cout << "valarray[i] operator* " << dtime<< " ms\n" ;

    cout << "------------------------------------------------------\n" ;

Here you can see that I used *= instead of c = a * b. In more modern mathematical libraries, very complex expression template mechanisms are used that eliminate this problem. In this case, I actually got very slightly faster results from valarray, although that's probably just because the contents were already in cache. The overhead that you are seeing is simply redundant temporaries and nothing intrinsic to valarray, specifically- you'd see the same behaviour with something like std::string.

share|improve this answer
1  
I verified your results. This change is not slight change though. Many compounding expression cannot always be done using *=, += /= –  shangping Jul 27 '11 at 22:19
    
@shangping: In that case, if you allocated a new result array for each of the temporary variables that you needed, you would see a similar slowdown for double as for valarray. –  Puppy Jul 28 '11 at 8:58
    
+1 as a one year celebration for this post –  Johan Lundberg Jul 27 '12 at 14:51
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I finally got this through using delayed evaluation. The code may be ugly since I am just starting learning these c++ advanced concepts. Correct me if you have better idea please. Thanks a lot for all your assistance. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <valarray>
#include <iostream>
#include "windows.h"

using namespace std ;
SYSTEMTIME stime;
LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;

double gettime_hp();
//to improve the c=a*b (it will generate a temp first, assigned to c and delete the temp
//which causes the program really slow
//the solution is the expression template and let the compiler to decide when all the expression is known
//delayed evaluation
//typedef valarray<double> Vector;
class Vector;
class VecMul
{
public:
    const Vector& va;
    const Vector& vb;
    //Vector& vc;
    VecMul(const Vector& v1,const Vector& v2):va(v1),vb(v2){}
    operator Vector();
};

class Vector:public valarray<double>
{
    valarray<double> *p;
public:
    explicit Vector(int n)
    {
        p=new valarray<double>(n);
    }
    Vector& operator=(const VecMul &m)
    {
        for(int i=0;i<m.va.size();i++) (*p)[i]=(m.va)[i]*(m.vb)[i];//ambiguous
        return *this;
    }
    double& operator[](int i) const {return (*p)[i];}  //const vector_type[i]
    int size()const {return (*p).size();}
};



inline VecMul operator*(const Vector& v1,const Vector& v2)
{
    return VecMul(v1,v2);
}


int main()
{
    enum { N = 5*1024*1024 };
    Vector a(N), b(N), c(N) ;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&sys_freq);   
    int i,j;
    for(  j=0 ; j<8 ; ++j )
    {
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) 
        {
            a[i]=rand();
            b[i]=rand();
        }

        double* a1 = &a[0], *b1 = &b[0], *c1 = &c[0] ;
        double dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        c = a*b ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

        dtime=gettime_hp();
        for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c[i] = a[i] * b[i] ;
        dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
        cout << "valarray[i] operator* " << dtime<< " ms\n" ;

        cout << "------------------------------------------------------\n" ;
    }
}

double gettime_hp()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER tick;
    extern LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&tick);
    return (double)tick.QuadPart*1000.0/sys_freq.QuadPart;
}

The running result on Visual studio is:

double operator* 41.2031 ms
valarray operator* 43.8407 ms
valarray[i] operator* 42.49 ms
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The whole point of valarray is to be fast on vector machines, which x86 machines just aren't. A good implementation on a nonvector machine should be able to match the performance that you get with something like
for (i=0; i < N; ++i) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i];

and a bad one of course won't. Unless there is something in the hardware to expedite parallel processing, that is going to be pretty close to the best that you can do.

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hmm..I tested blitz and its same as valarray..and more blitz++ [] operatpr is very slow

 #include <blitz/array.h>  
    #include <iostream>
    #ifdef WIN32
    #include "windows.h"
    LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;
    #endif
    #ifdef LINUX
    <ctime>
    #endif
        using namespace std ;
    SYSTEMTIME stime;


    __forceinline double gettime_hp();
    double gettime_hp()
    {
    #ifdef WIN32
        LARGE_INTEGER tick;
        extern LARGE_INTEGER sys_freq;
        QueryPerformanceCounter(&tick);
        return (double)tick.QuadPart*1000.0/sys_freq.QuadPart;
    #endif
    #ifdef LINUX
        struct timespec timestamp;

        clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &timestamp);
        return timestamp.tv_sec * 1000.0 + timestamp.tv_nsec * 1.0e-6;
    #endif
    }
    BZ_USING_NAMESPACE(blitz)

    int main()
    {
        int N = 5*1024*1024 ;

        // Create three-dimensional arrays of double
        Array<double,1> a(N), b(N),c(N);


        int i,j;
    #ifdef WIN32
        QueryPerformanceFrequency(&sys_freq);   
    #endif
        for(  j=0 ; j<8 ; ++j )
        {
            for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) 
            {
                a[i]=rand();
                b[i]=rand();
            }

            double* a1 = a.data() , *b1 = b.data(), *c1 = c.data() ;
            double dtime=gettime_hp();
            for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c1[i] = a1[i] * b1[i] ;
            dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
            cout << "double operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

            dtime=gettime_hp();
            c = a*b ;
            dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
            cout << "blitz operator* " << dtime << " ms\n" ;

            dtime=gettime_hp();
            for(  i=0 ; i<N ; ++i ) c[i] = a[i] * b[i] ;
            dtime=gettime_hp()-dtime;
            cout << "blitz[i] operator* " << dtime<< " ms\n" ;

            cout << "------------------------------------------------------\n" ;
        }
    }
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